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    advtanmoy
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    The definition of ‘secured creditor’ includes securitisation/reconstruction company and any other trustee holding securities on behalf of bank/financial institution. The definition of ‘securitisation company’ and ‘reconstruction company’ in Sections 2(1)(za) and (v) shows that these companies may be private companies registered under the Companies Act, 1956 and having a certificate of registration from Reserve Bank under Section 3 of the Securitisation Act. Evidently, Parliament did not intend to give priority to the dues of private creditors over sovereign debt of the State.

    [See the full post at: The Securitisation and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002 (Sarfaesi Act)]

    #121647 Reply
    advtanmoy
    Keymaster

    The purpose of  DRT  and the Securitisation Act

    The DRT Act and the Securitisation Act were enacted by Parliament in the backdrop of recommendations made by the Expert Committees appointed by the Central Government for examining the causes for enormous delay in the recovery of dues of banks and financial institutions which were adversely affecting fiscal reforms.

    The DRT Act facilitated establishment of two-tier system of tribunals. The tribunals established at the first level have been vested with the jurisdiction, powers and authority to summarily adjudicate the claims of banks and financial institutions in the matter of recovery of their dues without being bogged down by the technicalities of the Code of Civil Procedure. The Securitisation Act drastically changed the scenario inasmuch as it enabled banks, financial institutions and other secured creditors to recover their dues without intervention of the courts or tribunals. The Securitisation Act also made provision for registration and regulation of securitization/ reconstruction companies, securitisation of financial assets of banks and financial institutions and other related provisions.

    However, what is most significant to be noted is that there is no provision in either of these enactments by which first charge has been created in favour of banks, financial institutions or secured creditors qua the property of the borrower.

    Under Section 13(1) of the Securitisation Act, limited primacy has been given to the right of a secured creditor to enforce security interest vis-à-vis Section 69 or Section 69-A of the Transfer of Property Act. In terms of that sub- section, a secured creditor can enforce security interest without intervention of the court or tribunal and if the 1-WP-2935-2018 & Connected-FD borrower has created any mortgage of the secured asset, the mortgagee or any person acting on his behalf cannot sell the mortgaged property or appoint a Receiver of the income of the mortgaged property or any part thereof in a manner which may defeat the right of the secured creditor to enforce security interest. This provision was enacted in the backdrop of Chapter VIII of the Narasimham Committee’s Second Report in which specific reference was made to the provisions relating to mortgages under the Transfer of Property Act.

     In an apparent bid to overcome the likely difficulty faced by the secured creditor which may include a bank or a financial institution, Parliament incorporated the non obstante clause in Section 13 and gave primacy to the right of secured creditor vis-à-vis other mortgagees who could exercise rights under Sections 69 or 69-A of the Transfer of Property Act. However, this primacy has not been extended to other provisions like Section 38-C of the Bombay Act and Section 26-B of the Kerala Act by which first charge has been created in favour of the State over the property of the dealer or any person liable to pay the dues of sales tax, etc. Sub-section (7) of Section 13 which envisages application of the money received by the secured creditor by adopting any of the measures specified under sub-section (4) merely regulates distribution of money received by the secured creditor. It does not create first charge in favour of the secured creditor.

    By enacting various provisos to sub-section (9) of Section 13, the legislature has ensured that priority given to the claim of workers of a company in liquidation under Section 529-A of the Companies Act, 1956 vis-à-vis the secured creditors like banks is duly respected. This is the reason why first of the five unnumbered provisos to Section 13(9) lays down that in the case of a company in liquidation, the amount realised from the sale of secured assets shall be distributed in accordance with the provisions of Section 529-A of the Companies Act, 1956. This and other provisos do not create first charge in favour of the worker of a company in liquidation for the first time but merely recognise the existing priority of their claim 1-WP-2935-2018 & Connected-FD under the Companies Act. It is interesting to note that the provisos to sub-section (9) of Section 13 do not deal with the companies which fall in the category of borrower but which are not in liquidation or are not being wound up.

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