ALL News Headlines 2020 January 24TH

Chief Justice of India SA Bobde

SPEEDY TRIAL:  Chief Justice of India S A Bobde on Friday made a case for speedy resolution of tax disputes saying it will act as an incentive for tax payers and free the funds locked in litigation. “A just and speedy dispute resolution is perceived as a tax incentive by the taxpayer. To the tax collector, an efficient tax judiciary assures that demands arising out of legitimate assessment are not strangled in delayed litigation,” Bobde said at the 79th foundation day celebrations of Income Tax Appellate Tribunal.

NSA ON CAA PROTESTOR: The Supreme Court Friday said it cannot issue blanket orders restraining authorities from invoking the stringent National Security Act against people protesting the enactment of Citizenship (Amendment) Act.The Supreme Court Friday said it cannot issue blanket orders restraining authorities from invoking the stringent National Security Act against people protesting the enactment of Citizenship (Amendment) Act. A bench of Justices Arun Mishra and Indira Banerjee refused to entertain a plea challenging the imposition of NSA in few states as also in the national capital amid anti-CAA protests. “We are of the opinion that general writ will not lie in this case. We cannot invoke powers under Article 32. We agree that the NSA should not be misused but there cannot be a general command. This will create chaos,” the bench said.

INDIAN WORDS INCLUDED: The latest edition of the Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary features 26 new Indian English words, including Aadhaar, chawl, dabba, hartal and shaadi. The 10th edition of the dictionary, which was launched on Friday, has 384 Indian English words and incorporates over 1,000 new words such as chatbot, fake news and microplastic. The dictionary focuses on language change and its evolution through the years and has ensured that the language and examples used in the new edition are relevant and up to date with the times, Oxford University Press (OUP) said.

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The World Economic Forum

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation.

The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas.

It was established in 1971 as a not-for-profit foundation and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. It is independent, impartial and not tied to any special interests. The Forum strives in all its efforts to demonstrate entrepreneurship in the global public interest while upholding the highest standards of governance. Moral and intellectual integrity is at the heart of everything it does.

The Forum is best known for its Annual Meeting in Davos-Klosters. Through the years, numerous business, government and civil society leaders have made their way to the high Alps to consider the major global issues of the day and to brainstorm on solutions to address these challenges.

Founder :

Professor Klaus Schwab was born in Ravensburg, Germany in 1938. He is Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. An engineer and economist by training, Professor Klaus Schwab holds doctorates in Economics (summa cum laude) from the University of Fribourg, in Engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, and a Masters of Public Administration from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. In 1972 he became one of the youngest professors on the faculty of the University of Geneva.

Professor Klaus Schwab founded what was originally called the European Management Forum, as a non-profit foundation based in Geneva, Switzerland. It drew business leaders from Europe, and beyond, to Davos for an Annual Meeting each January.


 

The European Economic Area (EEA)

The EEA includes EU countries and also Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. It allows them to be part of the EU’s single market.

Switzerland is neither an EU nor EEA member but is part of the single market – this means Swiss nationals have the same rights to live and work in the UK as other EEA nationals.

The EU countries are:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

The United Kingdom and European Union have reached an agreement at European Council on the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland’s withdrawal from the European Union. The revised Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration were considered and agreed at European Council on 17 October 2019.

Final agreement dated 19 October 2019

Web 2.0 and E 2.0

Enterprise social software (E2.0). The use of an entire suite of emergent technologies — wikis, blogs, tagging, and social networking tools — both inside companies and between companies and the outside world.

Web 2.0 promulgates a vision of the next-generation Web as a place where billions of people interact online as the most potent creative force in history. But Web 2.0 itself is a complex vision that was originally defined by industry thought leaders who were attempting to capture what lies at the core of the most successful examples of what has happened over the 17 years of the public Web.

A Web 2.0 application often consists of nothing but a framework to elicit widespread input from thousands or even millions of potential contributors.

The open source movement of the 1990s was part of the genesis for this, demonstrating that very complex and high-value outcomes could occur if anyone and everyone were encouraged to contribute and the community around the effort ensured that quality was maintained. This model has since moved from software to almost anything you can imagine from YouTube videos to crowd-sourced gold prospecting (see goldcorp.com) or Wikipedia, an encyclopedia written by contributors from across the globe.

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Report [203] of the Committee on ‘Border Security: Capacity Building and Institutions’ Shri P. Chidambaram – Chairman

Two Hundred Third Report of the Committee on Border Security: Capacity Building and Institutions

Report The Action Taken Report of the Committee deals with the action taken by the Ministry of Home Affairs on the recommendations contained in the Two Hundred Third Report of the Committee on Border Security: Capacity Building and Institutions. The Two Hundred Third Report was presented to Rajya Sabha /laid on the Table of Lok Sabha, on 11th April, 2017.

TWO HUNDRED FIFTH REPORT ACTION TAKEN BY GOVERNMENT

ON THE RECOMMENDATIONS/OBSERVATIONS CONTAINED IN THE TWO HUNDRED THIRD REPORT ON BORDER SECURITY: CAPACITY BUILDING AND INSTITUTIONS)

(PRESENTED TO RAJYA SABHA ON 8TH MARCH, 2018)

(LAID ON THE TABLE OF LOK SABHA ON 8TH MARCH, 2018

COMMITTEE ON HOME AFFAIRS

(re-constituted w.e.f. 1st September, 2017)

 Shri P. Chidambaram – Chairman

INTRODUCTION

I, the Chairman of the Department-related Parliamentary Standing Committee on Home Affairs, having been authorized by the Committee to submit the Report on its behalf, do hereby present this Two Hundred Fifth Report on Action Taken by Government on the Recommendations/Observations Contained in the Two Hundred Third Report on ‘Border Security: Capacity Building and Institutions’.

2. The Two Hundred Third Report of the Department-related Parliamentary Standing Committee on Home Affairs was presented to the Rajya Sabha and laid on the Table of the Lok Sabha on 11thApril, 2017.After presentation of the Report, the copies thereof were sent to the Ministry of Home Affairs requesting them to furnish Action Taken Notes on the recommendations of the Committee contained in the Report. The Ministry furnished the Action Taken Notes on the said report to the Committee on 17th August, 2017.

3. The Committee has noted that the statement on the status of implementation of the recommendations contained in the said Report of the Committee has not been laid on the Table of Rajya Sabha/Lok Sabha in pursuant to the direction of Chairman, Rajya Sabha dated 24th September 2004.

4. The Committee considered the draft Two Hundred Fifth Report and adopted the same in its meeting held on 8th February, 2018.

5. The recommendations/observations of the Committee are printed in bold letters.

8th February, 2018

New Delhi

19 Magha, 1939(Saka)

P. ChidambaramChairman

Department-related Parliamentary Standing Committee on Home Affairs

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STATE(NIA)Vs SHEIKH AZHAR UL ISLAM AND OTHERS – Charge sheet by NIA

NATIONAL INVESTIGATION AGENCY

MINISTRY OF HOME AFFAIRS GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

NEW DELHI

FINAL REPORT(U/S173 (2) Cr PC)BEFORE THE HON’BLE SPECIAL COURT NIA,

NEW DELHI

STATE(NIA) VS SHEIKH AZHAR UL ISLAM AND OTHERS

 

Sections of law: Section 120B of IPC and Sections18, 20, 38 39 and 40of UA(P)Act,1967 as amended.

CHARGE SHEET FILED ON 25.7.2016

RC-04/2016/NIA/DLI PAGE 4OF 2816.

BRIEF OF THE CASE

The instant case RC-04/2016/NIA/DLI, dated 28.1.2016,under Section 120B of Indian Penal Code and 18, 18A and 18 B Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967,as amended, was registeredat PS NIA, New Delhiin compliance to the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India, IS-I division order number 11034/111/2015-IS-IV,dated 28thJanuary 2016 issued under Section 6 (5) read with Section 8 of the NIA Act, 2008, against three accused persons namely 1. Sheikh Azhar ul Islam son of Ab Satar Sheikh,resident of Prang, Kangan, Ganderbal 191131, Jammu and Kashmir, 2. Mohammed Farhan Shaikh son of Mohammed Rafiq Sadique Shaikh, Dost Apartments, B-Building, C-wing, 2ndFloor, Flat Number 18, Opposite Noorani Hotel, Kausa Mumbra District Thane 400612, Maharashtra, and 3. Adnan Hassan son of Mohammed Hussain Damudi resident of House No. 26, Daman, Sagar Road, Bhatkal, North Kanara 581320, Karnataka.

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STATE(NIA)Vs SHEIKH AZHAR UL ISLAM AND OTHERS – Charge sheet by NIA

CHARGE SHEET FILED ON 25.7.2016

International Law- definition

What is International Law

International law defines the legal responsibilities of States in their conduct with each other, and their treatment of individuals within State boundaries. International law encompasses a wide range of issues of international concern, such as-

  1. human rights,
  2. disarmament,
  3. international crime,
  4. refugees,
  5. migration,
  6. problems of nationality,
  7. the treatment of prisoners,
  8. the use of force,
  9. and the conduct of war,

among others. It also regulates the global commons, such as-

  1. the environment and sustainable development,
  2. international waters,
  3. outer space,
  4. global communications and
  5. world trade.

The International Law Commission was established by the General Assembly, in 1947, to undertake the mandate of the Assembly, under article 13 (1) (a) of the Charter of the United Nations to “initiate studies and make recommendations for the purpose of … encouraging the progressive development of international law and its codification”.

Under article 20 of its Statute, the Commission is required to prepare drafts in the form of articles and to submit them to the General Assembly together with a commentary containing an adequate presentation of precedents and other relevant data, including treaties, judicial decisions, and doctrine.

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United Nations Charter (full text-english)

Preamble
Chapter I (Articles 1-2)
Chapter II (Articles 3-6)
Chapter III (Articles 7-8)
Chapter IV (Articles 9-22)
Chapter V (Articles 23-32)
Chapter VI (Articles 33-38)
Chapter VII (Articles 39-51)
Chapter VIII (Articles 52-54)
Chapter IX (Articles 55-60)
Chapter X (Articles 61-72)
Chapter XI (Articles 73-74)
Chapter XII (Articles 75-85)
Chapter XIII (Articles 86-91)
Chapter XIV (Articles 92-96)
Chapter XV (Articles 97-101)
Chapter XVI (Articles 102-105)
Chapter XVII (Articles 106-107)
Chapter XVIII (Articles 108-109)
Chapter XIX (Articles 110-111)

 PREAMBLE

WE THE PEOPLES OF THE UNITED NATIONS DETERMINED

  • to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, which twice in our lifetime has brought untold sorrow to mankind, and
  • to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, and
  • to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and
  • to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

AND FOR THESE ENDS

  • to practice tolerance and live together in peace with one another as good neighbours, and
  • to unite our strength to maintain international peace and security, and
  • to ensure, by the acceptance of principles and the institution of methods, that armed force shall not be used, save in the common interest, and
  • to employ international machinery for the promotion of the economic and social advancement of all peoples,

HAVE RESOLVED TO COMBINE OUR EFFORTS TO ACCOMPLISH THESE AIMS

Accordingly, our respective Governments, through representatives assembled in the city of San Francisco, who have exhibited their full powers found to be in good and due form, have agreed to the present Charter of the United Nations and do hereby establish an international organization to be known as the United Nations.

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