Strengthening the Nation’s Forests, Communities, and Local Economies-Executive Order-22/04/2022

Strengthening America’s forests, which are home to cherished expanses of mature and old-growth forests on Federal lands, is critical to the health, prosperity, and resilience of our communities — particularly in light of the threat of catastrophic wildfires.  Forests provide clean air and water, sustain the plant and animal life fundamental to combating the global climate and biodiversity crises, and hold special importance to Tribal Nations.  We go to these special places to hike, camp, hunt, fish, and engage in recreation that revitalizes our souls and connects us to history and nature. 

Russian President Putin chaired a meeting on development of Arctic zone of Russian Federation-13/04/2022

Let me add the following. I urge the Government and the heads of the Arctic regions to take special responsibility for the smooth construction or renovation of social facilities – kindergartens, schools, hospitals, and rural medical and obstetric stations. Everything envisaged by our programmes and national projects should be implemented.

Forest cover in India under the National Forest Policy 1988

The National Forest Policy 1988 envisages to have a minimum of one-third of the total land area of the country under forest or tree cover. Continuous efforts are being made to achieve the goals as envisaged in the National Forest Policy and over the years the Forest and Tree cover of the country has been showing a positive trend. This increase may be attributed to plantation/ afforestation activities, better conservation and protection measures, natural regeneration and enhancement of existing forests.

Wildlife Crime Control Bureau (India)

he Government of India constituted a statutory body, the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau on 6th June 2007, by amending the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, a special Act to protect the wildlife in the country. The bureau would complement the efforts of the state governments, primary enforcers of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 and other enforcement agencies of the country.

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora-Appendices

When a species is included in one of the Appendices, the whole, live or dead, animal or plant is included. In addition, for animal species listed in Appendix III and plant species listed in Appendix II or III, all parts and derivatives of the species are also included in the same Appendix unless the species is annotated to indicate that only specific parts and derivatives are included. The symbol # followed by a number placed against the name of a species or higher taxon included in Appendix II or III refers to a footnote that indicates the parts or derivatives of animals or plants that are designated as 'specimens' subject to the provisions of the Convention in accordance with Article I, paragraph (b), subparagraph (ii) or (iii).

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora-1973

Recognizing that wild fauna and flora in their many beautiful and varied forms are an irreplaceable part of the natural systems of the earth which must be protected for this and the generations to come;Recognizing, in addition, that international co-operation is essential for the protection of certain species of wild fauna and flora against over-exploitation through international trade;

Wildlife Crime Control Bureau seized huge quantity of Wildlife contrabands

In an unprecedented intelligence operation of the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau (WCCB), New Delhi, two epicenters of illegal wildlife poaching and trade were identified in Anantnag area of Srinagar valley and Manwal in the Jammu region. In a joint operation of WCCB officers, who flew in from Delhi, officers of Jammu and Kashmir Chief Wildlife Warden and Police, simultaneous raids were conducted in both these places on 29.01.2021

Maharashtra’s ‘Buldhana Pattern’ of water conservation’ has won national recognition

Synchronisation of national highway construction and water conservation was achieved for the first time in Buldhana district, by using soil from the water bodies, nallas and rivers. This consequently lead to the increase in capacity of water storage across the water-bodies in Buldana district and it came to be known as 'Buldhana Pattern'.