COMMENTARIES ON THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES – J. STORY 1833

TABLE OF CONTENTS

VOLUME I.

The Constitution

Preliminary Chapter

BOOK I.

HISTORY OF THE COLONIES
Sections
CHAPTER I. Origin and Title to the Territory of the Colonies
CHAPTER II. Origin and Settlement of Virginia
CHAPTER III. Origin and Settlement of New-England, and Plymouth Colony
CHAPTER IV. Massachusetts
CHAPTER V. New-Hampshire
CHAPTER VI. Maine
CHAPTER VII. Connecticut 84- 93
CHAPTER VIII. Rhode-Island 94- 102
CHAPTER IX. Maryland 103- 110
CHAPTER X. New-York 111- 114
CHAPTER XI. New-Jersey 115- 120
CHAPTER XII. Pennsylvania 121- 125
CHAPTER XIII. Delaware 126- 127
CHAPTER XIV. North and South-Carolina 128- 142
CHAPTER XV. Georgia 143- 145
CHAPTER XVI. General Review of the Colonies 146- 158
CHAPTER XVII. General Review of the Colonies 159- 197

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Statutory Rape Issues in USA

USA

Background

Currently, all States have laws that prohibit sexual intercourse with persons under a certain age. Although commonly referred to as “statutory rape” laws, the term is not usually found in criminal statutes. Rape, sexual assault, and unlawful sexual intercourse are some of the more commonly used terms. By whatever name, these laws have been the focus of recent legislative interest. In the last few years, more than 20 States have considered proposals to amend these laws.

In 1997, under a cooperative agreement with the Office for Victims of Crime of the U.S. Department of Justice, the American Bar Association (ABA) Center on Children and the Law surveyed all States regarding statutory rape legislation they had considered within the last few years—from 1995 to early 1997.

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AMERICAN CYBERSECURITY LAW

USA

The term “cybersecurity purpose” means the purpose of protecting an information system or information that is stored on, processed by, or transiting an information system from a cybersecurity threat or security vulnerability. The term “information system” includes industrial control systems, such as supervisory control and data acquisition systems, distributed control systems, and programmable logic controllers.

DOMESTIC SECURITY

6 U.S. Code CHAPTER 6—CYBERSECURITY

SUBCHAPTER I—CYBERSECURITY INFORMATION SHARING (§§ 1501 – 1510)

§ 1501. Definitions
§ 1502. Sharing of information by the Federal Government
§ 1503. Authorizations for preventing, detecting, analyzing, and mitigating cybersecurity threats
§ 1504. Sharing of cyber threat indicators and defensive measures with the Federal Government
§ 1505. Protection from liability
§ 1506. Oversight of government activities
§ 1507. Construction and preemption
§ 1508. Report on cybersecurity threats
§ 1509. Exception to limitation on authority of Secretary of Defense to disseminate certain information
§ 1510. Effective period

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Federal Rules of Evidence ART- 3 Presumptions in Civil Cases

USA

Rule 301. Presumptions in Civil Cases Generally

In a civil case, unless a federal statute or these rules provide otherwise, the party against whom a presumption is directed has the burden of producing evidence to rebut the presumption. But this rule does not shift the burden of persuasion, which remains on the party who had it originally.

Rule 302. Applying State Law to Presumptions in Civil Cases

In a civil case, state law governs the effect of a presumption regarding a claim or defense for which state law supplies the rule of decision.

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Federal Rules of Evidence ART- 2 Judicial Notice

USA

Rule 201. Judicial Notice of Adjudicative Facts

(a) Scope. This rule governs judicial notice of an adjudicative fact only, not a legislative fact.

(b) Kinds of Facts That May Be Judicially Noticed. The court may judicially notice a fact that is not subject to reasonable dispute because it:

(1) is generally known within the trial court’s territorial jurisdiction; or

(2) can be accurately and readily determined from sources whose accuracy cannot reasonably be questioned.

(c) Taking Notice. The court:

(1) may take judicial notice on its own; or

(2) must take judicial notice if a party requests it and the court is supplied with the necessary information.

(d) Timing. The court may take judicial notice at any stage of the proceeding.

(e) Opportunity to Be Heard. On timely request, a party is entitled to be heard on the propriety of taking judicial notice and the nature of the fact to be noticed. If the court takes judicial notice before notifying a party, the party, on request, is still entitled to be heard.

(f) Instructing the Jury. In a civil case, the court must instruct the jury to accept the noticed fact as conclusive. In a criminal case, the court must instruct the jury that it may or may not accept the noticed fact as conclusive.


 

The Jay Treaty-1794-96: Signed Between United States and Great Britain

USA

The Jay Treaty-1794-96-On November 19, 1794 representatives of the United States and Great Britain signed Jay’s Treaty, which sought to settle outstanding issues between the two countries that had been left unresolved since American independence. 

 

Treaty of Amity Commerce and Navigation

Between

His Britannick Majesty and The United States of America

By

Their President, with the advice and consent of Their Senate.

Proclaimed on February 29, 1796.

His Britannick Majesty and the United States of America, being desirous by a Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation to terminate their Differences in such a manner, as without reference to the Merits of Their respective Complaints and Pretensions, may be the best calculated to produce mutual satisfaction and good understanding:

and also to regulate the Commerce and Navigation between Their respective Countries, Territories and People, in such a manner as to render the same reciprocally beneficial and satisfactory; They have respectively named their Plenipotentiaries, and given them Full powers to treat of, and conclude, the said Treaty, that is to say; His Brittanick Majesty has named for His Plenipotentiary, The Right Honourable William Wyndham Baron Grenville of Wotton, One of His Majesty’s Privy Council, and His Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;

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What is the Federal Reserve Bank (FED) and why do USA have it?

USA

What is the Federal Reserve Bank (FED) and why do we have it?

The FED is a central bank

Central banks are supposed to implement a country’s fiscal policies. They monitor commercial banks to ensure that they maintain sufficient assets, like cash, so as to remain solvent and stable. Central banks also do business, such as currency exchanges and gold transactions, with other central banks. In theory, a central bank should be good for a country, and they might be if it wasn’t for the fact that they are not owned or controlled by the government of the country they are serving. Private central banks, including our FED, operate not in the interest of the public good but for profit.

There have been three central banks in our nation’s history. The first two, while deceptive and fraudulent, pale in comparison to the scope and size of the fraud being perpetrated by our current FED. What they all have in common is an insidious practice known as “fractional banking.”

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OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR LITIGANTS IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR LITIGANTS IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

Court of Chancery- State of Delaware USA

I. PLEADINGS AND SERVICE

(1) Special Process Servers: The following uniform procedure applies to all persons serving process for Court of Chancery matters.

i. All persons, other than the Sheriff, wishing to serve process for Court of Chancery matters must be registered with the Court, which registration will be renewable annually on May 1 of each year.

a. Individuals wishing to become designated as special process servers must complete the Application of Individual Seeking Designation as Special Process Server and accompanying certification, in the form attached to the Court Rules.

b. The Applicant, or the company or law firm that employs them, must pay an annual registration fee of $300 and an annual renewal fee of $300, plus $50 per person for each person the applicant seeks to register as a special process server.

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