Rajasthan Police Rules, 1965

Notification No. F. 16 (2) Home (A.Gr. 1) 65, dated April 12, 1965-In exercise of the powers conferred by sections 45 of and 46 of the Police Act, 1861 (Act V of 1861), as in force, and as applied to Ajmer area and the pre reorganisation State of Rajasthan, read with secs. 41 and 42 of the Madhya Bharat Police Act, Samwat 2007 (Madhya Bharat Act 76 of 1950) as applicable to sunel area the State Government hereby makes the following rules; namely; –

CHAPTER I

1.1. Short Title, extent and commencement – These rules may be called the Rajasthan Police Rules, 1965. They shall extend to the whole of the State of Rajasthan except the Abu area. They shall come into force at once.
1.2. Interpretation. – In these rules –
(a) unless the context otherwise requires, form means a form appended to these rules;

(b) reference to the Police Act, 1861 (Act V of 1861) or any provision thereof shall, with respect to the Sunel area be construed as references to the Madhya Bharat Police Act, Samwat 2007 (Madhya Bharat Act 76 of 1950) as in force in that area, or the corresponding provision thereof.

1.3. Repeals and Savings. – (1) With effect from the date of commencement of these rules, the Rajasthan Police Regulations, 1948, and any other corresponding rules and orders in force in any part of the State to which these rules, extend shall, in relation to matters covered by these rules, stand superseded.
(2) Notwithstanding such supersession anything done, any action taken under the rules or orders so superseded shall be deemed to have been done or taken under the provisions of these rules.

CHAPTER II

Preventive and Detective Organisation

2.1 Principles of the Criminal Law and Police Organisation. – The Criminal Law of India and the Police Organisation, which is based upon it, are both founded on the principle that public order depends essentially upon the responsibility of every member of the community within the law to prevent offences and to arrest offenders. The magisterial and police organisation is set up to enforce, control and asist this general responsibility. This fundamental principle must be thoroughly understood and borne constantly in mind by Police Officers of all ranks.
The ideal to be aimed at in respect of relations with the public is that every police officer, or whatever rank, should be regarded by every law abiding person as a wise and impartial friend and a protector against injury to his person and property. In proportion as this deal is approached, the police will receive the information and assistance which they need in order to combat crime successfully. When confidence and co-operation are lacking private persons and village officials resort to connivance at crime and to seeking redress for their own losses through treaty with criminals, the police are isolated in their efforts to prevent and detect offences, and can hope for but a small measure of success.
The proper relations between the police and the public in a district depend primarily upon the personal attitude of the Superintendent, and the example set by him enforced upon his subordinates. The most important duties of a Superintendent are to know the people of his district & to know what his subordinate are doing, such knowledge can only be gained by the fullest personal accessibility activity in touring, thorough and intelligent supervision and a sympathetic interest in the life of the district and the facts and difficulties of the work of his own men. He must inspire confidence in his subordinates, as well as in the public. While alert to check tyranny, dishonesty and other abuses by his subordinates, he must be as accessible to them as to non officials and ready at all times to help them in their difficulties and support them against the evil influences, which they have to face. This should be the attitude of all supervising officers. They should ensure direct access to themselves unimpeded by their Subordinates, and must be ready to give a patient hearing to all complaints and grievances, but must avoid creating any impression of spying, which would destroy the confidence and undermine the authority of their officers.
2.2 Sub-Divisional Magistrate, Relations with. – The relations between the Sub-Divisional Magistrate and Police officers with whom he has to deal should be both cordial and intimate, and every opportunity shall be taken to keep him informed of the state of crime in his ilaqa Conference can be discussed and remedies devised, should be encourage; police officers coming in with challans should take the opportunity of obtaining an interview with the Sub-Divisional Magistrate and discussing with him the state of crime in their jurisdictions.
2.3. Panchas an Village Watchmen. – The Code of Criminal Procedure prescribes definite duties in respect of reporting and preventing offences in case of members of Panchayat and Watchmen of villages. It is the duty of the Gazetted Police Officers to take Particular note of the work of the village officials, namely members of Panchayats,Village Watchmen. They should be encouraged in the performance of their duties and suitably rewarded when they do well Serious or persistent negligence of duty should be brought to the notice of the Superintendent of Police in the periodical inspections of the Police Station mention shall always be of made of the degree of assistant received by the police from village officials of his jurisdiction and or Particularly meritorious work or noteworthy dereliction of duty on the part of individuals.
2.4. Duties of Police under local and special laws. – Many of the most important and most frequently exercised functions of the police derive from local and special laws. In some cases powers so derived have been specially referred to in different chapters of these rules, but irrespective of such reference, a knowledge of the provisions of all local and special laws, more or less comprehensive according to the duties of his rank, is required of every trained police officer.
2.5 Absconders and harbourer. – A vital factor in both the detection and prevention of crime is the execution of the law in respect of absconding an harbouring. The provision of the law are adequate to prevent both these offences but their proper and comprehensive administration demands the constant attention of magistrates and supervision police officers. The absence or preventive of absconding and harbouring are among the acid tests to the efficiency of the criminal administration. Instructions as to the taking out an execution of warrant when persons, whose arrest is required, are not immediately found, are contained in rule 7.5. This is the first essential. Under Section 87, Code of Criminal Procedure and court may at any time issue a proclamation against a person for whose arrest that court has issued a warrant. All that is necessary is that the court should be satisfied not necessarily by evidence, that the said person has absconded or is concealing himself so that such warrant cannot be executed’ The Court may further at any time after proclamation Order the attachment of any property, movable or immovable, or both belonging to the proclaimed person’ The period of thirty days mentioned is section 87, Code of Criminal Procedure, is that within which the absconder in called upon to surrender; it imposes on delay on the issue of attachment orders. The issue of a proclamation under Section 87, Code of Criminal Procedure, renders liable to the penalties of Section 216, Indian Penal Code, an one who gives to the person proclaimed any assistance of the nature described in section 52 A, Indian Penal Code.
(2) The action prescribed in rule 7.5 for obtaining a warrant of arrest shall be taken by the police immediately they have grounds for making such arrest. Every reasonable effort to execute such warrant shall then be taken.
If such efforts fail the court which issued the warrant be satisfied that the warrant cannot be executed; evidence of the guilt is of the wanted man in the offence under investigation is not required. When a proclamation order has been obtained, the police are bound to publish that order as required by Sec. 87 (2), Code of Criminal Procedure Immediately this has been done complied with, Thereupon the person wanted becomes a proclaimed offender’ and the rules in Chapter IV regarding the entry of such persons name in the surveillance register, list of proclaimed offenders. Notices to village Panchas and Watchmen of all places where he has connections or which he is likely to visit etc. shall be forthwith complied with.
(3) The procedure of search under warrant and proclamation shall carried out in every case in which a wanted person cannot be immediately arrested without warrant by the investigating officer. Discretion may be exercised by both the police and magistrates whether to proceed with attachment of property under Sec. 88, Code of Criminal procedure In every case, where there is a danger of more crime resulting from an absconder remaining at large an attachment order shall be immediately applied for. The police are not authorised to carry out attachment but it is the duty of the prosecuting branch to see that the necessary orders issued from the court without any delay, and of the officer conducting in investigation to take steps to prevent the improper alienation of attachment property by fictitious mortage or sale. For this purpose lists of such property should be made, as part of the investigation, and attached to the police file of the case, and the village watchmen and Sarpanch should be directed to report any attempt at alienation or removal pending the issue of attachment order. the lists of property prepared by the investigation officer, attested by competent witnesses, should be put into court with the application for an attachment order.
(4) To prevent harbouring, without which no absconder can remain at large, thorough publicity in regard to the issue of a warrant and sub sequent proclamation order is essential. If this receives proper attention, the defence of ignorance is denied to the person who can be proved to have, rendered any sort of assistance to an absconder.
2.6. Reports and records. – In order that continuity in the method of administration outlined in rule 2.1 may not be lost owing to changes of personnel, the proper maintenance of these reports, records and notes which review the history of the criminal administration of a district, or from which information regarding individuals and past event may be obtained, is essential. Apart from personal records of police officers, police station records and inspection notes, referred to in other chapters of these rules, such records comprise –
(i) Transfer of charge memoranda (rule 2.7)

(ii) Confidential note books (rule 2.8)

(iii) Weekly diary (rule 2.9 et seq.)

(iv) Monthly crime report (rule 2.12)

(v) Annual Police Administration Reports (rule 2.1)

(vi) Reports on political events or meetings (rule 2.14)

(vii) Reports on important fairs and festivals (rule 2.15)

2.7 Transfer of charge memoranda. – (1) Every Superintendent and Deputy Inspector General shall before leaving a district or range on transfer, or otherwise record a memorandum containing all necessary information for the guidance of his successor and for the preparation of the annual administration report.
(2) The following are some of the matters to be attended to in taking over charge of a district and in preparing the memorandum mentioned in sub-rule (1) above:
(a) State of contingent allotments, and adequacy or inadequacy under different heads of the budget;

(b) Additional police, existing and proposed;

(c) New buildings or repairs required;

(d) Pending cases of importance;

(e) Confidential records of correspondence;

(f) General state of crime;

Organisation preventive and detective operations including special mention of the duties of the District Investigating Agency and modus oeprandi office and current measures of co-operation between the police and public for the prevention of offences.

(h) Proclaimed offenders and dangerous and active gang;

(i) Matters noted at the Deputy Inspector General’s Inspection as requiring attention;

(j) Custody of keys of case chest, confidential box, etc;

(k) Notes on the character and capabilities of officer;

(l) Punishment files pending;

(m) Vacancies and suggestions regarding recruiting;

(n) Approved lists for promotions.

2.8. confidential book. – There being many matters connected with the police administration of a district which find no place in office registers, and a record of which is necessary, both for the superintendents own information and for the benefit of succeeding officers, every Superintendent shall maintain a confidential note book.’ The details given below shall among others, find a place in this note book Each successive Superintendent adding to and revising, in his own notes, the information on record; and Deputy Inspectors General shall, at their inspections, examine the books and comment on the adequacy or otherwise of the notes recorded. The book shall be in two parts as below-

Part I

(a) Villages specially notorious for the bad character of their inhabitants.

(b) Names of village official who have come prominently to notice, with brief notes regarding them

(c) Names and brief accounts of noted or professional political agitators or reference, at their files.

(d) Names and brief accounts regarding specially notorious, bad characters and, in cattle thieving of the Chief Rassagirs.’

(e) Notes of fairs, periodical religious processions and other local gatherings with reference to the file explaining the police arrangements necessary at each.

(f) A list of capable detectives and intelligence agents among Head Constables and Constables with reference to the special qualifications of each.

(g) Other matter of permanent interest.

An index to the contents in Part I shall be maintained on the first page, as many pages as may be considered necessary being allotted to each subject. Subject to the above rules the information may be recorded by superintendent in any form they deem most convenient. It should be as concise a possible, a reference being given to other files or previous papers for more detailed informations.

Part II

Part II shall be in the form of a permanent file containing the making over charge memoranda referred to in rule 2.7.
2.9. Weekly diary. – The district Superintendent will himself prepare a weekly report of political activity on all matters of interest to the Special Branch. These reports shall be based on information received by the District Superintendent of Police through the D S B, through the district police and through such other channels and sources as he may have. These weekly reports will be dispatched from the district every Saturday so as to reach the State Special Branch not later than Monday. Copies of the weekly reports will also be sent by the District Superintendent of Police to his District Magistrate and the Range Deputy inspector General of Police.
(2) Office copes of confidential diaries shall be kept for three years or for such longer period as the Superintendent of Police considers desirable.
(3) The copy of the diary should be kept by the Deputy Inspector General of Police of the Range concerned for 3 years.
2.10. Contents of weekly. – The contents and forms of weekly diary will be as prescribed under Para 47 of the District Special Branch Manual. The following are among the matters which shall be mentioned in this diary.
(a) Information regarding political movements of parties, leaders, publication, and the like.

(b) Information regarding religious/acts changes in doctrine and practice having a political significance, proselytism of preaching of a provocative nature.

(c) Information regarding foreigners and others, the reporting of whose movements and activities has been ordered or is considered necessary.

(d) Information regarding current rumours or topics of interest which are causing or are likely to cause animosity between classes or disturbance of public tranquillity.

(e) Public opinion regarding the legislative or executive matters of Government.

(g) Political or religious meetings and celebrations which are important either intrinsically or by reason of public speeches, propaganda and the likely associated with them.

(h) The effect on public opinion of current discussions in the press.

2.11. miscellaneous orders regarding weekly diary – (1) Weekly diary shall be written on half margin, and every separate subject shall be entered in a separate paragraph, and each paragraph shall be numbered. seriatim.
(2) To ascertain and to report correctly the prevailing temper of the people is one of the most important duties a Superintendent has to perform.
(3) When an entry in the diary concerns the police of a district, other than the one from which it is submitted, the Superintendent by or through whom it is submitted, shall state whether he has, or has not communicated the facts direct to the Superintendent concerned.
2.12. Monthly crime report – (1) A monthly crime statement shall be prepared in evenly district in accordance with instructions issued by Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal investigation Department. The S.H. Os. will compile their reports Incorporating figures up to 27th of the month and send them to the Superintendent by the third of the next month Superintendents will send their reports to Deputy Inspector General of police, Criminal Investigation Department Positively by the 9th of each month. The Superintendent shall personally compose a brief review of the state of crime in the district, both in regard to its main divisions and generally. Noteworthy features in the monthly statistics shall be Commented upon and references shall made to the progress and development of any special measures for combating crime Copies of monthly crime reports shall also be endorsed to the Range Deputy Inspector General of Police and the District Magistrate.
2.13. Annual Police Administration Report. – Every Superintendent shall prepare the annual administration report in January of each year for the previous calendar year. Lists of subjects to be reported on, the returns to be submitted, and detailed instructions for their preparations are issued on the approved forms every year by the Deputy Inspector General of police, Criminal Investigation Department. No alterations in, or additions to these instructions shall be made without a reference to the Inspector General.
(Every Superintendent shall submit the annual administratiOn report through District Magistrate and the Range Deputy Inspector General of Police. The Superintendent Government Railway Police, shall also submit his annual administration report to the Inspector General through Deputy Inspector General Incharge of Railway Police. Each district report shall be forwarded as follows: –
By the Superintendent to the District Magistrate on or before the 31st January;
By the District Magistrate the Deputy Inspector General on or before the 10th February;
They will than be forwarded by Deputy Inspector General to the Inspector General. Every Superintendent shall also submit direct the Inspector General an advance copy of the annual report and the returns appended to it.
The report should consist of concise and intelligent criticism of facts of the figures given in the Prescribed returns. No mere paraphrasing and reproduction of statistics should be allowed in the body of the report. Variations in the figures which are not unusual or important should not be commented upon. The briefer a report the better it is, if it includes all that is necessary to show an intelligent comprehension of the meaning of the facts and figures and of the salient features of the year’s work. The object of the report is to state what has been done rather than to suggest what should be done. Matters of the latter nature should be reported in a separate official letter. Any such comment or suggestion which is considered necessary in the annual report should be as brief as possible, specially where the matter is complicated or controversial.
2.14. Public meetings. – It is the duty of Superintendent of Police to arrange for the accurate reportings of all political and other public meetings held to discuss matters which are likely to disturb the public tranqusility. To this end they shall encourage officers to learn. Hindi shorthand. If the meetings to be reported are of State importance, Superintendent of Police may request the assistant of the Superintendent of Police Special Branch, Criminal Investigation Department, who will arrange with the Deputy Inspector General of the Range for the deputation of a Stenographer from another district in his Range. At meetings at which inflammatory speeches are considered likely, arrangements shall also be made to have official and non-Official witnesses present who may be available in the event of the prosecution of any of the speakers being undertaken.
When meetings are obviously of importance in connection with a particular form of agitation or when the speeches at them appear to be actionable, a detailed report shall be sent immediately to the Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, with a list of the official and non-official witnesses present. Reports in such cases shall not be delayed for inclusion in the confidential weekly diary but copies shall be forwarded with the confidential weekly diary to the Deputy Inspector General of the Range for information superintendents of Police are responsible that the reports of all meetings are written in clear and intelligible English Reports should show the classes present at the meetings and estimate the effect of the speeches on the audience.
The police have right to attend public meetings with a view to:
(i) Preventing any infringements of the law, or

(ii) taking evidence with a view to the possible prosecution of law breakers. All public meetings can therefore, be attended by Police reporters but as the right of entry may at times be questioned or even forcibly resisted by the organisers, it is important, when such facts are apprehended that a sufficient body of police in uniform should be deputed to discourage opposition.

2.15. Reports of fair and festivals. – (1) Every Superintendent in whose district any fair or public assemblies or importance are to take place shall to the Ist December in each year, submit a list of such fairs and assemblies for the year next ensuing, with the dates on which they will be held, to the Inspector General for publication in the Police Gazette.
(2) On the termination of the important fairs and festivals, Superintendent shall submit a report in form 2.15 (2) dealing briefly with the prominent features of the fair; crime occurring in connection with it; conduct of the police; accidents or fatalities occurring, if any and the existence of any excitement of a political or religious nature, etc. such reports shall be submitted to the Deputy Inspector General of the Range, who will at his description forward them to the Inspector General of Police. Events of immediate importance shall also be reported promptly and by radiogram if necessary, by the Superintendent direct to the Deputy Inspector General of the Range and the Deputy Inspector General, C.I.D.
2.16. Political and communal activities in relation to law and order – Rule 2.14 lays upon Superintendents of Police the duty of watching and reporting on political or communal movements as such. As part of his general duty of maintain touch with the progress of activities, which may have consequences likely to disturb public tranquillity, it is incumbent upon every officer incharge of police station and officer superior thereto, to keep himself fully informed of all developments or off shoots of such movements in his jurisdiction. To this end such officers must know the persons who take the lead in such matters, and the attitude towards them of men of influence. As soon as any such movements shows signs of developing on lines which are likely to cause animosity between sections of the people and breaches of the peace, or to be otherwise clearly subversive of law and order, the Superintendent in consultation with District Magistrate, shall take such action as may be most appropriate to the occasions, but when the activity is political rather than communal and no orders of Government cover the case, ordinarily a reference should be made to Government before measures to check it are set in motion. Police officers of all ranks are required to refrain they are not concerned with the merits of such controversies, but solely with the maintenance of the public peace. In the category of personal participation, however, acquaintance and maintenance of touch with communal leaders is not included. Relations of this kind may help Superintendents and other gazetted police officers to prevent the development of communal trouble and occurrence of open disputes, and may enable them on occasions to bring leaders together with salutary results for the settlement or minor causes of friction.
2.17. Religious processions – (1) Periodical public religious processions shall not be permitted to proceed along new routes without the written sanction of the district Magistrate.
(2) When a periodical public religious procession is about to take place the Superintendent shall acquaint himself with the police arrange entmade in past years and shall made the necessary arrangements in consultation with the District Magistrate, following, as far as may be the procedure previously adopted.
(3) In each district a separate file shall be kept of each periodical public religious procession showing strength and disposition of the police force employed and the average number of persons attending the procession.
(4) Whenever a licence is granted for a procession there shall, if possible be a plan of the route on the back of licence. All licenses grated shall be in form 2.17 (4)
(5) The Superintendent shall not grant a license for an important public religious procession of a novel character or on an occasion when public feeling is excited, without taking the orders of the District Magistrate.
2.18. Press advertisements – (1) The newspaper press shall be used as a medium both for advertising police regulations affecting the public and for enlisting the assistance of the public in the investigation of crime.
Examples –
(i) Traffic regulations and directs for festivals and official functions.

(ii) Description of wanted offenders or lost property, specially when a reward is offered.

In both classes of publicity referred to in this rule press advertising shall be supplemented, when considered advisable, by posters for affixing to notice boards and leaflets for wholesale distribution. Advertising shall be in English or Hindi or both, as may be most appropriate in each case.
2.19. Criminal Intelligence Gazette, Notice fo. – Notices for novel or professional offences and memoranda embodying the shifts and artifices of criminals shall be sent for publication in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette for general information. Such notices shall be sent direct to the Superintendent of Police, Criminal Investigation Department and shall be in narrative or other form, as far as possible, ready for the press.
2.20. Duties for Criminal Investigation Department – The following are the chief duties of the Criminal Investigation Department in so far as they effect the district police –
(i) To promote co-operation between the police of different districts and different states and centrally administered territories.

(ii) To undertake of assist in the investigation of cases or class of crime which have state or inter-state ramifications if the Inspector General of Deputy Inspector General, Criminal Investigation Department, considers the such action is in the interest of the criminal administration.

(iii) To watch and report on all communal, political and subversive movements affecting the state and India as a whole, to maintain close co-operation with district authorities in all such matters and to direct investigations connected with them.

(iv) Through the medium of the Criminal Intelligence Gazette (a) to check crime by the prompt publication of information of the prevalence of a particular class of crime and of the absence from their homes of a dangerous criminals;

(b) to secure the detection and arrest of persons wanted for offences committed;

(c) to trace property stolen and recovered;

(d) to act generally as an agency for disseminating intelligence likely to aid the police in their work.

(v) to collect, co-ordinate and disseminate political and criminal intelligence.

2.21. Requests for services of officers of criminal Investigation Department – The services of investigating officers of the Criminal Investigation Department may be asked for by Superintendent of Police in any case of the following nature:-
(a) Note forgery, counterfeit coining of professional poisoning cases where the conspiracy appears to attend to other states and there is not a suitable staff to deal with them in the district.

(b) Theft of Government arms and ammunition illicit, trade in arms.

(c) Extensive frauds and bogus company promoting

(d) Cases of dacoity concerning more than one district.

(e) Organised traffic in women.

(f) Cases of such a technical nature as, in the opinion of the District Superintendents of Police appear to call for the services of an officer of the Criminal Investigation Department.

The Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, shall decide in each such case whether he can comply with the request of the Superintendent of Police.
2.22. Status of Criminal Investigation Department Officers in Investigations – The Criminal Investigation Department has no separate jurisdiction and can only investigate under the cover of a First information Report registered at a Police station having jurisdiction. The Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, may decide to take over the control of any particular investigation himself or to depture one or more of his officers to work directly under the control of the Superintendent of Police of the district concerned. In either case the latter officer has the right to be kept fully informed of the progress of the investigation. All cases diaries written by officers of the Criminal Investigation Department shall be forwarded to the Gazetted Officer or the Criminal Investigation Department under whom they are working through the Superintendent of Police, advance copies being sent direct if so ordered.
(2) When dealing with cases in conjunction with the district police, officer of the Criminal investigation Department must bear in mind that is indispensable to gain the confidence and good will of the local police and to avoid giving cause for jealousy.
(3) When good results are obtained full credit must be given to district police officers for any share they have had in the work and, when results are unsatisfactory, care must be taken not to criticise the local police unfairly.
(4) Remarks of District superintendent of Police on all recommendations made by officers of the Criminal Investigation Department for rewards for exceptionally good work done in cases wholly or partly investigated by officers of the Criminal Investigation Department shall invariably be obtained (who may add any recommendation or remarks he may consider necessary).
2.23. Criminal Investigation Department-no control over district police – Officers of the Criminal Investigation Department shall have no control or executive authority over the district police except in an emergency and within the powers vested in them by their rank in the State Police force.
All matters affecting the discipline of or rewards to and complaints, against, the district police, shall be referred by the Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, to the Deputy Inspector General of Police of the range concerned.
2.24. Prosecution of case investigated by teh Criminal Investigation Department – The consent of the Deputy Inspector General Criminal Investigation Department, shall be obtained before an officer of the department is presented as a witness in court. Criminal Investigation Department officers shall advise and assist the district investigation and prosecuting officers in the conduct in court of cases in the investigation of which they have shared.
2.25. Rules of the Criminal Investigation Departmen. – The full rules of the Criminal Investigation Department are contained in the Manual or that Department.
2.26. Circumstances in which Criminal Investigation Department can assist Investigation officers – The Criminal Investigation Department is on possession of special apparatus and its officers include those accustomed to the handling of certain branches of police technique. Investigation district police officers and Superintendent of police should remember, therefore, that the Criminal Investigation Department is in a position to give assistance in circumstances of the type as are illustrated below:-
(a) the reconstruction of faded writing;

(b) the examination of arms and bullets used in crime;

(c) the examination of minutiae such as hair, pieces of skin, dust, etc;

(d) the solution of cipheres;

(e) the examination of forged documents, counterfeit coins and moulds;

(f) the photographing of important documents;

(g) the interrogation of suspects from other states;

(h) the connection of local suspects with suspects of other districts or States;

(i) when an opinion on handwriting is required to assist the investigation;

(j) where invisible are suspected to have been used.

(In view of limited resources, such matter shall be referred to Criminal Investigation Department in Cases where other evidence sufficient of the purpose of the case concerned is not forthcoming or other evidence needs further support for success of the case). -In important cases the Criminal Investigation Department will enlist the aid of scientific persons outside the Police Department;

The Department is also ready, when circumstances permit, to assist district police officers with technical advice on the spot as to the discovery and preservation of clues at the scene of crimes and can sometimes loan apparatus and qualified operators thereof for these and similar purposes.
2.27. Officer of Criminal Investigation Department to report to Superintendent of Police – Ordinarily when an officer of the Criminal Investigation Department is sent to a district to take up enquiries and invariably, when he is sent to investigate a case, he will take with him a letter addressed to the Superintendent of Police or Senior Officer present at headquarters, describing the nature of the work on which he is sent, and, when necessary, asking for his assistance.
2.28. Organisation of Police in towns and cities – (1) In each district the Superintendent of Police shall issue standing orders regulating the point and beat duty to be carried out in each town for which police establishment is provided. These orders shall be revised as often as may be necessary to meet variations in the local incidence of crime, development of new residential or commercial areas, increase in establishment and the like. The division between the investigation and police station writing staff and the watch and ward staff shall be maintained as far as is practicable, though interchange of duties should be made, Men, even though qualified, should not be employed on the investigation staff while posted to the watch and ward staff, except in cases of emergency, as such employment must detract from the efficiency of the watch and ward system.
(2) The success of a system of watch and ward in a town or city will depend on:-
(a) the discipline of the men on beat and patrol duties;

(b) the extent to which the men have been instructed in their duties;

(c) the amount of supervision exercised by superior officers. Superintendents of Police must therefore, arrange that, an addition to the standing orders referred to in the above rule, head constables are frequently questioned so as to ensure that the training they have receive in the lines School and at the police Training School is not forgotten put into Practise. Each constable on beat or patrol duty should continually have in mind the specific duties required of him.

2.29. Modus Operandi Bureau – The instructions concerning the examination of scenes of thefts and burglaries and the particulars required to be submitted in case of all such offence are given in Appendix 2.29 and the various modus operadi from to be used are detailed below:-

(a) RPM 1…Name Index Card.

(b) RPM 2…Alias Index Card.

(c) RPM 3…M.O. Index Card.

(d) RPM 4…Crime Record Card.

(e) RPM 5…Physical Peculiarities Card.

(f) RPM 6 & 6A Indentifiable Stolen Property Index Card.

(g) RPM 7…Wanted Persons Card.

(h) RPM 8…Style Index Card.

(i) RPM 9…Trade Mark Index Card.

(j) RPM 10…To be used for sending information to D.I.A. by. S.H. Os. or I.Os after vision the scene of crime.

(k) RPM 11…To be sent when the investigation is over.

(l) RPM 12…Memo from S.H.0 to D.I.A.-Information of arrest and verification.

(m) RPM 13…Particulars of the persons arrested along with their & 13A descriptive roll.

(n) RPM 14…Memo for forwarding S.S. to F.P.B.

(o) RPM 15…Memo for taking Photograph of the person arrested.

(p) RPM 16…Jail release register.

(q) RPM 17…Photo album.

(r) RPM 18…Case Index Card (for undetected cases).

(s) RPM 19…Register for registration of criminals.

(t) RPM 20…Transport Index Card.

CHAPTER III

The Police Station

3.1 Officer incharge of Police Station. – (1) The officer incharge of a Police Station is ordinarily a Sub-Inspector. Within the limits of the police Station jurisdiction the Sub-Inspector is primarily responsible for the effective working, management, good conduct and discipline of the local police, for the preservation of peace and the prevention and detection of crime the due performance of all Police duties the exercise by the police of the powers granted them by law, the correctness of all registers, records and reports prepared by them and the direction, instructions and efficiency of all police subordinates in the station jurisdiction and matters for which the officer incharge of a police station is essentially answerable.
(2) It is the duty of the officer in-charge of a police station to acquire detailed and accurate local knowledge, to secure the whole heated co-operation of Panchas of Parchayats and Chowkidars, encouraging them to give an information to assist him in this work and to range themselves loyally on the side of the administration. Through them and his own subordinates he is required to keep a strict watch over all known bad characters, and he shall communicate all intelligence of movement to his superiors and to other police stations without delay.
(3) Within the limits of his charge he is the chief investigating officer and as such he shall conduct all investigations in person, so far as circumstances permit. His responsibility in this matter must be carefully maintained. should it be necessary, owing to the absence of the Sub-Inspector or any other cause, for a subordinate to undertake an investigation, the Sub-Inspector shall satisfy himself by pursuing the case diary and questioning the investigating officer that the investigation has been fully and properly conducted, shall remedy what is defective and take over the investigation as soon as he is free to do so, except in a case originally investigated by an Assistant Sub-Inspector where he will guided by rule.
(4) When Present at the Police station, he shall personally supervise the routine work of the Station House, and shall be careful to see that there are no arrears of correspondence and that the accounts are correct.
3.1 Assistant Sub Inspectors. – (1) One or more Assistant Sub Inspectors are attached to each police station, proportion to the normal amount or crime registered, as subordinate investigating Officers. An Assistant Sub-Inspector is the Assistant and deputy of the officer. An Assistant Sub-Inspector is the Assistant and deputy of the officer In-charge of the Police station, who, without detracting form his own authority or ultimate responsibilities as described in rule 31 may delegate powers and duties generally or specifically to one other of his assistants, on the same principles as the Superintendents of Police delegates authorities and duties to Gazetted Officers subordinate to him.
(2) An Assistant Sub-Inspector is required to have approximately me same standard of efficiency in all branches of Police Station work, detective, Preventive and administrative, as a Sub-Inspector, but his responsibilities are less in that he is not in independent charge, and his powers are subject to the detailed control and supervision of the Sub-Inspector. In respect of investigations, the Sub-Inspector is required to exercise careful supervision over the work of his Assistant Sub-Inspector, as laid down in rule 3.1, but need not, and should not, normally take into his own hand an investigation started by an Assistant Sub-Inspector, except when he finds the latters investigation gravely defective.
3.3. The Station Clerk. – The Police Station Clerk is a literate Head Constable who, under the control and supervision of the officer incharge of the Police Station, acts as Clerk, Accountant Record keeper and Custodian of Government and other property at a police station. He may be assisted by one or more Assistant clerks.
3.4. Duties as a Clerk. – As Clerk of the Police Station the station Clerk performs the following duties:-
(a) He opens, registers and hands over all correspondence to the Officer Incharge of the Police station or Senior Officer Present and take his orders for the disposal of papers. He writes all reports and returns called for by competent authorities and is responsible that all pending papers are promptly disposed of.

(b) Every morning be brings to the notice of the officer incharge of the station (i.e. Senior Officer Present) all postponed orders and pending papers awaiting execution and reply. At morning roll call the records the same officer as to the distribution of duties for the day.

(c) He writes up the daily dairy and other station house resiters. He sees that the file of the Police Gazette is kept up-to date, and that all orders and notices contained in it, which concern the staff are carefully noted and explained to all concerned.

3.5 Duties as an Accountant: – As Accountant, the station clerk is responsible for the correctness of the cash book, of the cash balance in hand, and for all accounts of receipts or expenditure rendered to his superiors. He must, without fail, bring every item of receipt or expenditure to his superiors. He must, without fail, bring every item of receipt or expenditure promptly and fully to account. If any appropriation of public money to purposes for which it was not intended occurs, or if money shown as expended is not expended, or is expended in a different way from that shown, he is bound to report the matter at once to the Superintendent. He will not be allowed to shield himself by pleading the others of his superior officer, but will he held responsible for malversations which would not have been possible if his accounts had accurately represented the facts. He writes, out invoices, and cheques and files receipts and other vouchers for payments made. He prepares the monthly acquintance rolls and accounts of deductions and stoppages from pay and all travelling allowance and other claims of the officers and men of the station concerned, and sees that acquitance rolls are duly signed and forwarded. The duties and responsibilities of the station clerk under this rule shall not be delegated to any other member of the police station staff.
3.6 Duties as a Record Keeper – As a Record Keeper, the station clerk is responsible that all registers and other record are safely kept and they do not suffer injury from damp, vermin or other cause. He periodically eliminates and sends to Head Quarters the records which are no longer required to be maintained according to rule.
3.7 Duties as a Custodian of Property – As custodian, the station clerk is responsible for all Government property, including arms, ammunition, bicycles, articles of clothing and equipment other than such as are in the personal charge of individual officers, and all unclaimed property connected with cases. He is in direct charge of the store rooms and shall keep the keys of an personally superintend all receipts and issues therefrom. He shall also be responsible for the safe custody and dieting of persons in the lock-up and shall personally keep keys thereof.
3.8. Continuous presence at Police Station – The Station Clerks duties necessitate his continuous presence at the Police Station; accordingly he shall not be employed on investigation work or any other duty involving his absence from the Police station for any long period. If he leaves the station house for any purpose which is likely to prevent his return within a few minutes on an urgent summons under the provision of rule 3.32 he shall formally make over charge to the assistant clerk and shall make an entry in the daily diary. Similarly on return to duty, he shall again in enter the fact in the daily diary and both entries shall be signed by the Assistant Clerk as evidence of his responsibility during the absence of the station clerk. Under no circumstances, shall the station clerk and the Assistant Clerk be both absent from the police station at the same time.
3.9 Literate Police Officer – Other literate police officer shall be employed under the general direction of the officer in charge of the police station to assist the clerk in the up keep of criminal records, and to assist in the investigation of cases and the collection, recording, and dissemination of intelligence.
3.10 Watch of Police Stations – (1) A standing sentry at Police Stations shall be posted. In addition to looking after the general security of the police station, he shall be responsible for the safe custody of the prisoners in the lock-up valuable property in the store-room, if any.
(2) Standing orders describing the duties of the entry shall be framed by the Superintendent of Police and hand-up in the police station office. The Officer incharge of the police station shall read out the appropriate part or part, of this standing order when allocating duties at Roll Call Vide Rule 3.11.
(3) Ordinarily there shall be a Police Officer, who shall usually be the senior officer present at the station house, available and ready in proper uniform to receive information and complaint and to afford such assistance as may be lawful and necessary; and at every post there at all times one police officer in uniform incharge of the building and property, but such police officer shall not be expected to do more than keep on the alert.
3.11. Roll Calls – At sun-rise and at sun-set the officer incharge of the police station, i.e., the senior officer present, shall fall in all the police present at the station and hold a roll call. At this roll call instruction shall be given in respect of all general and special orders which may have been received from superior authority or which the officer incharge of the police station may see fit to promulgate, and duties shall be allocated. The police detailed for watch duty shall be under the orders of station clerk who shall invariably enter their signatures or thumb impressions in the station diary immediately after the roll call.
3.12 Inspection before proceeding on duty – All officers proceeding on duty shall appear before the senior officer present at the station, who shall satisfy himself that they are correctly turned out and understand the duties allotted to them and who shall record in the daily diary an entry to the effect that he has done so, giving particulars as to the men, the duties and the time of inspection. This rule is binding on men posted on watch duty and the entry in the daily diary in their case shall be in addition to the entry required under rule 3.11 above.
3.13 Parades – The officer incharge of the police station is responsible for keeping his staff proficient in drill and to secure this end must hold parade in a police station is no bar to the giving of much useful instruction. When a parade is held, a record must be made in the daily diary in which will be incorporated a parade statement and a note of the instruction given.
3.14 The Police Station Lock up- The rules in Chapter VII for the control of lock ups and the custody and case of prisoners shall apply strictly to all police stations and posts.
3.15. Public Property – Subject to the orders and responsibility of the Officer incharge of the police station, the station clerk shall be considered to be incharge of all public property including money and case property in his station house. Every officer incharge of the station shall examine the property at least twice a month and shall report in the following Mondays diary that he has done so. If property is found to being incomplete or to be in any way damaged he shall add to his report the names of the persons responsible for the loss or damage.
He shall also see that the property in connection with a case in expeditiously disposed of according to magisterial orders on the conclusion of the case. All Property shall be examined by Officers incharge of police stations on receiving and handing over charge and by station clerks on relief. All damages and shortage must then be carefully noted and reported to the Superintendent of Police.
3.16. Case Property – (1) The police shall seize weapons, articles and property in connection with criminal cases and take charge of property which may be unclaimed:-
(a) Under the implied authority of Section 170, Code of Criminal Procedure;

(b) in the course of searches made in police investigation under sections 51, 165 and 166, Code of Criminal Procedure;

(c) under section 153, Code of Criminal Procedure, as regards weights, measures, of instruments for weighing that are false:

(d) under section 550, Code of Criminal Procedure, as regards property alleged or suspected to have been stolen provided that if the property consists of an animal or animals belonging to Government or to persons of goods status; it may be made over through a Commissioned or a Gazetted Officer under the orders of a Magistrate who is empowered to make such an order under section 523, Criminal Procedure Code;

(e) under section 550, Code of Criminal Procedure as regards property found under circumstances which create suspicion of the commission of an offence; when an offence in respect of an animal is committed and such animal not stolen property such animal shall be seized and sent with the case to the Magistrate having jurisdiction;

(f) under section 25 of the Police Act, as regards unclaimed property,

Ordinarily the police shall not take possession of movable property as unclaimed when it is in the possession of an innocent finder; but in cities on the police may in compliance with an order issued under section 26 or 27 of the Police Act, take possession and dispose of unclaimed property made over to them by innocent finders.
Such property shall be entered in the store room register;
(g) under the provisions of Local and Special Law.

(2) Each weapon, or article of property not being cattle, seized under the above rule, shall be marked or labelled with the name of the person from whom, or the place where it was seized; and a reference to the case diary or other report submitted from the police station.
If articles are made up into a parcel, the parcel shall be secured with sealing was bearing the seal impression of the responsible officer, and shall be similarly marked or labelled. Such articles or particles shall be placed in safe custody, pending disposal as provided by Law or Rules.
(3) The police shall send to Head Quarters or to magisterial courts,
(a) all weapons, articles and property connected with cases sent for trial;

(b) suspicious, unclaimed and other property when ordered to do so by a competent Magistrate.

(4) Motor vehicles detained or seized by the police in connection with cases or accidents shall be produced before a Magistrate after rapid investigation or by means of incomplete challan. The evidence relating to the identity or condition of the vehicle should be led and disposed of at an early date, and the Magistrate should then be invited to exercise the discretion vested in him by section 516 A. Code of Criminal Procedure, to order that the vehicle by made over to the owner pending conclusion of the case on security to be produced whenever demanded by the court.
3.17. Custody of money – All Government money received in the police stations and not disbursed forthwith shall be kept in the store room.
3.18. Custody of property – (1) Property exceeding in value Rupees Two Thousand whether appertaining to case, or seized on suspicion, or taken as unclaimed, shall be forwarded as soon as possible to District Head Quarters for deposit in the treasury in the case of property connected with a case to he tried at an outer station of Tehsil, to the Tehsil Treasury, where it shall be placed in the Tehsil, strong room under charge of tehsildar.
Large sums of money or valuable property of any description shall not be entrusted to police officers below the rank of Head Constable.
When property is brought from outer stations to Head Quarters at a time when the Prosecuting Inspector and Sub-Inspectors are engaged in court duties, the bearer shall hand it over to the Head Constable acting as Assistant to the Prosecuting Inspector under rule 8.12 obtain his receipt in acknowledgement of the road certificate. When a prosecuting officer is free, the bearer of the property shall have the road certificate countersigned by him before his return to his police station.
(2) All case property and unclaimed property other than cattle, of which the police have taken possession shall, if capable of being so treated, be kept in the store room. Otherwise the officer incharge of the police station shall make other suitable arrangements for its safe custody until such time as can be dealt with under sub-rule (I) above.
Each article shall be entered in the store room register and labeled, the label shall contain a reference to the entry in store room register and a description of article itself and, in the case of articles of the case property, a reference to he case number. If several articles are contained in a parcel, a detail of the articles shall be given on the label and in the store room register.
The officer incharge of the police station shall examine Government and other property in the store room at least twice a month and shall make an entry in the Station diary on the Monday following the examination to effect that he had done so.
3.19. Post Office cash safe – Post Office cash safes may be embedded in safe positions in police stations by arrangement between the Superintendent of Police and the Superintendent of Post Offices.
The police department accepts no responsibility for the safe custody of such safes and Superintendents shall not permit them to be embedded at places where no safe accommodation exists.
The work of embedding shall be carried out by the Postal Department.
3.20. Beat and Patrolling duties – The orders in connection with beat and patrolling duties are contained in rule 2.28.
3.21. Field Firing by troops – When, under arrangements approved by the District Magistrate concerned, the military authorities conduct field firing or artillery practices they are required by military orders approved by Government to provide troops to clear and keep the ground. Police shall not be supplied for this duty. The police are further forbidden to take any part in securing the evacuation of villages or confinement of people to their Government to provide troops to clear and keep the ground. Police shall not be supplied for this duty. The police are further forbidden to take any part in securing the evacuation of villages or conferment of people to their house in connection with such practices. Such action, when ordered by the District Magistrate, shall be carried out by Revenue Offices and village officials.
3.22. Duties at ferries – Police officers stationed at ferries shall afford such lawful assistance as may be necessary for the regulation of traffic and shall prevent the over crowding of ferry goods.
3.23. Religious processions – The orders relating to periodical religious processions are contained in rule 2.17.
3.24. Dramatic performances and cinematograph displays – (1) Whenever a dramatic performance is about to take place the officer in-charge of the local police station shall be responsible that all tents, booths and other temporary structures erected for public performances are inspected before they are opened to the public.
Such structures must have proper facilities for repid egress and for the prevention and extinction of fire, and must be so placed that there is no danger of fire, from adjacent buildings.
(2) If the arrangements appear to be insufficient, immediate report shall be made to the senior magistrate present at the place in question; of in whose jurisdiction the structures have been erected.
(3) The Superintendent shall report to the District Magistrate any defects in buildings commonly used for public performances which are likely to endanger human life.
(4) The rules made by Rajasthan Government under Section 10 (b) & (d) of the Rajasthan Cinema (Regulations) Act, 1952 include the following:
(1) Every building shall be provided with an adequate number of clearly indicated entrances and exits so placed and maintained as readily to afford the audience ample means of safe movements and with a passage 3 fee in width for every 10 rows of sitting accommodation. By adequate, is meant, 5 linear ft, of exit way for 500 square feet of sitting space inside.
(2) The total number of spectators accommodated in the building shall not exceed 20 per hundred square feet of the area available for sitting and standing or 20 per hundred and 33 square feet of the over all area of the floor space in the auditorium.
(3) Fire appliances shall be provided.
(4) The cinematograph machine shall be placed in a permanent enclosure of sufficient dimensions to allow the operators to work freely. The enclosure shall be substantially constructed of fire resisting material or lined with the same.
(5) The licence and plan (of the building) and description, if any, attached thereto, shall be produced on demand to the Superintendent of Police or any Police Office deputed by him.
(6) No smoking shall at any time be permitted within the auditorium or the enclosure.
3.25. Foundings – If a child deserted by his parents or guardian is found by a police officer or brought to a police station by a person who is under no legal obligation to maintain it, and who is unwilling to take care of it, such child shall be cared for at the police, station and brought before the local magistrate as soon as possible. The orders of such magistrate shall be take as to the disposal of the child and any reasonable expenditure not exceeding 75 Praise per day incurred from permanent advance of the police station for the maintenance of the child, shall be got reimbursed from the court. Should the delay in bringing the child before the local magistrate amount to more than a few hours, advantage shall be taken of the existence of any orphange or other charitable institution which may be willing to shelter the could until it is finally disposed of by the magistrate’s order..
3.26. Duties in connection with epidemic disease – On the appearance of cholera, plague, small pox or any other disease in epidemic form or unusual mortality amongst rats in any police station jurisdiction, the officer in-charge of the police station shall at once inform the Superintendent of Police, the District Medical Officer or Health and the Medical Officer of the nearest dispensary.
3.27. Additions and alterations to buildings – Officers in-charge of Police Stations shall not permit any additions or alterations to existing buildings without the previsions sanction of the Superintendent of Police.
3.28. Diet of accused person. – The rules for the provision of diet at police stations to accused persons and for the recovery of expenses in this connection are contained in rule 7.27.
3.29. Advance of diet money to witnesses. – Advance at police stations of diet money to witnesses, and the recovery of such advance shall be governed by the rules laid down by the Government in this regard.
3.30. Charges of animals connected with cases. – complainants in cattle cases, or sureties to whom cattle have been made over for safe custody and production if and when required during police investigation, shall receive the cost of maintaining animals connected with the case. The rate sanctioned for each day and for each day’s journey shall be fixed by the district Magistrate subject to the proviso that the complainant has travelled or has been detained in the interests of the case at a place, more than five miles from his home.
Superintendent of Police shall provide lists showing the rates for each animal and these lists shall be hung-up in the police station office.
Expenses incurred under this rule during the course of investigation of the case shall be paid from the permanent Advance allotment of Police Station. Expenditure on this account shall be debited to Head ‘Rewards to Private Persons.’
3.31. (a) Kits of men on leave – When an officer proceeds on leave from the police station he shall hand over all Government property in his possession to the station clerk who shall at once prepare a list of all articles. The kit will be folded and kept in the store room. The Station clerk is responsible for its safe custody. When the officer in-charge of the police station proceeds on leave he shall hand over all Government property for which he is responsible to the officer appointed to act for him, such property as is not required by the latter for current use being placed in the store room.
(b) Return of revolvers when officer is on leave or under suspension- when an officer to whom a revolver has been issued ceases to be a police officer or ceases to belong to a rank to which revolvers are issued, or proceeds on leave other than casual leave, he shall return the revolver issued to him, together with all equipment, ammunition and accessories issued to him with such revolver to the lines officer for deposit in the head quarters armoury.

3.32. Married police officer. – (1) Married quarters are provided in police stations in accordance with the scale approved by the Government Officers to whom these quarters are allotted may sleep in them, provided that they are not on watch or entry duty or required to be in the police station building for any reason.
(2) At police station where family quarters are provided upto the maximum scale laid down by the Government no other police officers shall be allowed to have rented accommodation else where.
At police stations where family quarters have not been provided upto the maximum scale laid down by the Government the number of officers permitted to occupy quarters outside the police station shall not exceed such scale.
(3) a list of married police officers attached to each police station and its subordinate posts shall be maintained in the police station.
3.33. Journeys by road and by rail – Use of railway warrants in case of journey by rail, and bus warrants in case of journey by road shall be governed by rules framed by the Government from time to time.
3.34. Notice and notice board. – (1) Only such notices as are required by rule or by special order of the superintendent of Police to be hung at police stations are to be displayed.
(2) Notice boards at police stations shall be used solely for the display of police and other official notices. Public notices by local bodies may be displayed on such boards with the permission of the officer incharge of the police station, but their use for private or trade announcements and advertisements is strictly prohibited.

3.35. Registers The following books shall be maintained at each police station in accordance with the rules hereinafter prescribed or referred to-

(1) The First information Report Register and, in certain stations they Register of Petty Offences.
(2) The Station Diary.
(3) Part. 1 Standing Order Book, Part-III-Circular and other orders.
(4) Register of absconders and Deserters.
(5) Register of Correspondence.
(6) Miscellaneous Register.
(7) The village Crime Register.
(8) The Surveillance Register.
(9) Enquiry Rolls Dispatched.
(10) Enquiry Rolled Received,
(11) Index to History Sheets and Personal files.
(12) Register of Information Sheets Dispatched.
(13) Copies of Information sheets Received.
(14) Minute Book for Gazetted Officers.
(15) File Book of inspection reports.
(16) Register of Government Official and Property
(17) Register of Licenses.
(18) Receipt Book for Arms, Ammunition and Military Stores.
(19) The store Room Register.
(20) Cash Accounts.
(21) File Book of Road Certificates.
(22) Printed Receipt Books.
(23) Police Gazette.
(24) Criminal Intelligence Gazette.
(25) Police Rules.
(26) Charge Notes of Officers In-charge of Police Stations.

3.36. General orders regarding station registers – (1) No alteration in the form or method of keeping the books and no addition to their number may be made without the sanction of the Inspector General being previously obtained.
(2) Every station register shall be paged. In the case of all registers except parts IX, Ill,IV and V of Register numbers (7)-The village Crime Register and registers (10)- Bad Character Rolls Received, (11)-Index to History Sheets and Personal files and (12)- Copies of Information sheets Received, this shall be done in the office of the Superintendent before issue to a police station. No page may be torn out of the station register. Any correction which it may be necessary to make shall be made by drawing a line through the mistake so as to leave the words erased legible and by writing in the corrected words afterwards or in the margin. A piece of paper shall not be pasted over a mistake.
(3) All entries shall be neatly and clearly written and all correction shall be attested by the signature of the officer making them. If words or lines are omitted form an entry, or if an entry is omitted altogether, no interpolation shall be made. The omission shall be supplied by a fresh entry in the regular course.
Note :-Seal of a uniform pattern have been provided for each police station and for the offices of Superintendent and deputy Inspectors-General and no deviations shall be allowed from the contingencies or new seal all procured for additional stations.

3.37. Register number (1). – Order regarding the first Information Report Register are contained in rule 5.5 and regarding the Petty Offences Register in rule 5.9.
3.38. Register number (2). – (1) The daily diary shall be maintained in accordance with Section 44 of the Police Act. It shall be form 3.38(1) and shall be maintained by means of the carbon copying process. There shall be two copies. One will remain in the police station register and the other shall be Dispatched to the Circle Officer every day at the hour fixed in this behalf.
Shortly before the close of each quarter, books containing the proper number of pages for the ensuing three months shall be issued to police station by the superintendent. The Superintendent shall fix the hours at which station diaries shall be daily closed with reference to hour of dispatch of the post or messenger.
(2) All entries in the station diary shall be made by the officer in-charge of the police station or by the station clerk. Literate officer making report shall read the report recorded and append their signatures. Every matter recorded in such diary shall be so recorded as soon as possible; each separate entry shall be numbered and the hour at which it was made shall commence each such entry. If the hour at which the information, or otherwise, containing such entries reaches a police station differs from the hour at which such entry was made both hour shall be stated. As soon as an entry has been made in the diary, a line shall be drawn across the page immediately below it.
(3) The opening entry each day shall give the name of each person in custody, the offence of which he is accused, and the date and hour of his arrest, the name of each accused person at large on bail or recognisance and the date of his release on such security.
The last entry each day shall show the balance of cash in hand as shown in the cash account.
(4) The daily diary is intended to be a complete record of all events which take place at the police station. It should, therefore, record not only the movements and activities of all police officers but also visits of outsiders whether official or non-official, coming or brought to the police station for any purpose whatsoever.
3.39. Matters to be entered in Register number (2)-The following matters shall, amongst others, be entered:-
(a) The number and description of cattle seized in connection with cases or on suspicion with reference to the case or report.

(b) The day, hour and purpose of visits to the police station of convicts released under the Remission Rule or under Section 565, code of Criminal Procedure, together with the names of such persons.

(c) The hour of arrival and departure on duty at or from a police station of all enrolled police officers of whatever rank. whether posted at the police station or elsewhere, with a statement of the nature of their duty, this entry shall be made immediately on arrival or prior to the departure of, the officer concerned and shall be attested by the latter personally by signature or seal.

Note – The term police station will include all places such as police lines and police stations where register number(2) is maintained.

(d) Every police officer of or above the rank of Head Constable; when returning from duty other than an investigation in which case diaries are submitted, shall have an entry made in the daily by the station he has visited and the duties per by him during his absence from the police station.

(e) The hour of receipt and dispatch of all communications, property, cash, etc, giving reference to the number in the corresponding register.

Note – The word ‘Communications’ shall be taken to include the reports required by police rule 3.47 and police rule 8.1 to be sent to Panchayats.

(f) Information of the commission of non-cognizable offiences (rule 5.3) including reports of emities likely to reach to a breach of the peace (rule 4.28); visits of Chowkidars to police stations (rule 2.3).

(g) All arrivals at, and dispatches from, the police station of persons in custody, and all admissions to and removals from the police station lock-ups, whether temporary or otherwise an exact hour being given in every case.

(h) The hour and date of receipt and (Separately) of service or execution of each process and hour and date of return made to such process.

(i) The report regarding property in the store room required by rules 15 and 3.18 (2).

(j) The report regarding excess of expenditure over the permanent convance as required by rule 3.58.

(k) The deposit in or removal from, the post office safe in the police station of any article whatsoever, the exact hour being given in every case.

Note – Every such entry shall contain detail of the articles deposited or removed and shall be signed by the sub or Branch Post Master affecting the deposit or removal.

(l) A reference to every information relating to the commission of cognizable offence and action is taken under Section 157, Code of Criminal Procedure, the number and date of the First Information Report submitted.

Note – In case where the information relates to the commission of cognizable offence triable by a Panchayat mention shall also be made in the daily diary of the measures taken to send a copy of the First Information Report to the Panchayat concerned as required by police rule 5.5 (2).

(m) In Monday’s diary a list shall be given of all papers pending for a week.

3.40. Punishment for making false entry – Any police officer who enters or causes to be entered in the daily diary a report which he knows, or has reason to believe,to be untrue, whether he has not been directed to make such entry by his superior officer, shall ordinarily be dismissed from the service.
Copy of this rule. shall be affixed to the cover of the daily diary in every police station or post and in lines.
3.41. Destruction of daily diaries – Daily diaries may be destroyed two years after the date of the last entry.
3.42. copies of certain entries to be sent to district Force clerk – (1) A copy of the extract of the relevant portions of every entry in the daily diary relating to the arrival or departure report of any police officer posted to or transferred from, the police station or a post subordinate thereto, shall be sent without delay to the Force Clerk. Copies of the reports of the deaths, admission to and discharge from hospital of police officer attached to the police station, or its subordinate posts, shall be similarly sent.
(2) All copies required to be made of entries in the daily diary by this or any other rule shall be made at the time of original entry by means of the carbon copying process, as many sheets of paper being inserted under carbon paper as may be required.
3.43. register Number (3) – Part I- Standing Order Book.
All standing Orders by the Inspector General shall be entered in a file book which shall be of the size of a quarter sheet of country paper. These standing orders shall be continuous for five years and the file shall be indexed. These orders will be checked annually.
As soon as possible after the Ist January in each year the reader to District Superintendent of Police shall send to the lines and each police station a list, prepared from his file index, of all current standing orders which should be on record, and shall be responsible for supplying duplicate copies of any which may then be found deficient. The repeal of a standing order shall be noted in the index and communicated by the reader to all concerned. Modifications shall be notified to all concerned when ordered and the original orders shall be corrected accordingly.
Part-II-Circular and other orders.

In each police station an annual file shall be maintained of all circulars and other orders issued for the instruction and guidance of the police and not being standing orders or orders on which a reply is returned in original. Each paper before being placed on this file shall receive a registration number in the correspondence register, where the subject and the fact of its being placed in the file shall be noted. These files shall be reviewed after five years.
3.44. Register No (4) Absconders and Deserters – In addition to the list of all proclaimed offenders to be hung up in the office and on the notice board of police stations, in accordance with rule 4.25 the register of absconders shall be maintained in the following parts:
Part I – In Form 3.44(a) containing the names of all absconders of cases registered in the home police station.
Part II – In From 3.44(b) containing the names of absconders in cases registered in other police stations, but residents of or likely to visit the home police station.
Note – All entries regarding residents of the home police station shall be made in red ink.

Part III – List of deserters from the army, Form 7.13(4).
As soon as absconder has been proclaimed under section 37, code of Criminal Procedure, his name shall be entered among the proclaimed offenders in Part I of register number III.
3.45. Register No. (5) register of Correspondence – The correspondence register shall be maintained in two parts in forms 3.45. Each part shall contain 400 pages.
(1) In Part I shall be entered a brief extract of all reports and order received at the police station and of all letters and replies dispatched which are not entered in any other book.
(2) When an entry is made in the receipt columns the corresponding dispatch column shall be left blank for the reply and vice versa.
This register is a receipt and dispatch register and is not meant as a record of the full correspondence. Correspondence received and not meant is forwarded or returned shall be filed in monthly files. These shall be destroyed after two years.
(3) In Part II the receipt and returns of processes shall be entered. Processes include
a. Summonses to appear or to produce.

b. Warrants of Arrests.

c. Search Warrants.

d. Orders of proclamation, attachment, injunction or otherwise under section 87, 88, 95, 99, 133, 140, 143, 144 and 145 code of Criminal Procedure.

On the last day in each month a statement giving the following information shall be entered in the daily diary in red ink-
(a) the number of warrants remaining unexecuted at the end of the previous months received and executed during the current month and remaining unexecuted at the end of it.

(b) similar information regarding summonses in cognizable and non-cognizable cases.

(c) similar Information regarding other processes.

At the end of the year any statistics required shall be complied from such entries in the daily diary.
3.46. Register Number (6) Miscellaneous Register – This register shall be divided into five parts:-
Part I – List Character Rolls of applicants for Government service verified by the police in form 3.46 (1).
Part II – List of persons on security in form 8.14 (3).
Notes – Particular of arrest under Section 109- Code of Criminal Procedure, of persons who are residents of another police station shall be entered in red ink and given a separate serial number, the form being completed when the result of the case is intimated by the prosecuting agency.

Part III – Carbon copies of all reports submitted for action under the Indian Penal Code and Criminal Procedure Code of local and special laws such as prosecutions under section 182, Indian Penal Code, Preventive Security under the Criminal Procedure Code.
Part IV – Carbon copies of reports of Investigation into accidental deaths of human being in which forms 6.34 (1) A,B & C are submitted A yearly index will be maintained for this part.
This register may be destroyed seven years after the date of the last entry.
Part V – Register of conviction of licenced drivers of motor vehicles-
(1) This register will be maintained in the same form as conviction register (Rule 3.48) alphabetically by name. All offences committed by licensed drivers of motor vehicles whose permanent homes are in the jurisdiction of the police station will be entered in this register. Magistrates will report convictions and endorsement of licence to Superintendents of Police in Conviction slips and after the necessary entries have been made in the register the slips will be kept in a personal file in order that a record of all convictions and endorsement may be available for reference in the event of the driver losing his licence and applying for a fresh one.
(2) Convictions entered in this register will in addition, be entered in the conviction register Form 3.47(1) Part V when the offence for which a conviction is rewarded is one required by rule 8.22 to be so entered.
This does not apply in the case of convictions under Section 16 of the Indian Motor Vehicles Act, 1939.
3.47. Register Number (7).- The Village Crime Register – (1) This register shall be maintained in six parts as follows:-
Part I – Notes on the village community containing the particulars required by Form 3.47(1) Part 1.
Part II – The Crime Register, in Form 3.47 (1) Part II Cognizable cases decided by Panchayats shall be entered in Parts II & V of this register as cases dealt with direct by magistrates.
Part III – Cases traced to the village, in Form 3.47 (1) Part III. The term ‘cases traced to. the Village’ as used above, shall be held to include only cognizable cases under chapter XVII Indian Penal Code, in which strong suspicion rested on any resident of the village whether the case occurred in the village itself or not. When a case under chapter XVII remains untraced or fails in the court the necessary entry in this register should never be omitted, Information sheets will also provide valuable material for making this important register complete. In combination with the conviction register it should be used as an index to the criminals of the Ilaka. A separate entry shall be made for each suspect with a separate serial number. When a person is again suspected, the fresh entry shall bear the same serial number as the previous suspicion and the number of suspicion shall be entered below it, in the form of a fraction similar to the system of numbering used in part V of this register.
Part IV – Visit to the villages of persons of doubtful character, i.e.:-
(i) Persons whose history sheets are on record on Bundle A;

(ii) Persons established through information sheets (stranger roll) to be of doubtful character either by reason of having been suspected or convicted of offences in respect of which entries are required to be made in part BI or part VI of their home police station or for other adequate reasons.

(iii) Persons arrested in the village under Section 55/109, Cr. P.C. provided that no entry shall be made unless the persons concerned are placed on security.

Note. – This procedure will not apply in cases where particulars of the persons concerned would otherwise be normally entered by virtue of (i) and (ii) above.

Part V – Notes on crime in the village (Confidential) in Form 3.47 (i) Part V.
Part VI – The Conviction register in Form 3.47(1) part VI(2) Parts WTI and IV shall be loosely bound together in a cover of standard pattern for each village or group of villages. When a group of closely allied villages is combined in one volume, separate pages in each part shall be allotted to each village. The prescribed cover for the village crime note book is obtainable from the Director, Printing and Stationary Department, Rajasthan.
(3) An alphabetical list of all convicts belonging to any town or village shall be bound up with parts I to IV of the village crime register concerned and shall be kept up to date from the conviction register.
(4) Each part in each volume shall be paged. The cover shall bear clearly on the outside the name of the village or villages to which it relates. The binding edges of the pages and of the cover shall be punched with two eyelet who as before issue from the office of the Superintendent of Police and tape shall be provided. so that volumes may be neatly kept at all times but may be easily opened for the insertion of extra pages where necessary Additional pages shall be given the same number as the page they follow and distinguished by consecutive letters of the alphabet.
(5) Part V shall be kept in separate volumes corresponding to the volumes of Part I to DI, but shall be treated as confidential and shall remain in the personal custody of the officer-in-charge of the police station. Matters to be entered or detailed in rule 4.15.
(6) The whole of the village crime register is an unpublished official record relating to affairs of state and is privileged under section 123, Indian Evidence Act. No.Part of the register may be shown to nor may any copy or extract therefrom or any information- derived therefrom be given to any person not entitled by his official position to obtain such information.
3.48. The Conviction register-(I) Part VI of the village crime register shall be maintained as a separate register, in volumes of not more than 100 pages each, known as the conviction register, Entries shall be made by the officer-in-charge of the police station personally or, under his special general orders, by such one of his subordinates as writes the best hand. Entries in this register shall be confined to the offences mentioned in rule 22.
(2) The conviction register is a permanent record of the crime and criminals of each village and of previous convictions, and is to a great extent the basis for the preparation of history sheets and other measures of surveillance.
(3) On the first page of each volume of the register shall be entered alphabetical order a list of the town and villages of the Jurisdiction, the conviction record of which are contained to such volumes. The serial number of each town and village shall be entered to the left and a reference to pages allotted to it to the right. At the end of the last volume of the register pages shall be allotted for the names of convicts,whose residence cannot be traced or who are residents of places outside. India, but who commonly frequent the jurisdiction of the police station so far as may he possible every conviction required to be entered in the register shall be entered in the pages allotted to the town or village in which the convict ordinarily resides. In all cases of conviction in an offence in the railway, the letter “R” in red ink shall be entered in the remarks column of the entry in the conviction register. Information regarding the conviction shall also be sent by the Superintendent of Police to the Superintendent Government. Railway Police for the use of the Railway Police Central Investigation Agency. All Subsequent convictions offender shall also be communicated to the agency which will in turn communicate the information to the Railway Police sub Inspector charged with Surveillance work and the maintenance of the original history sheet of the criminals.
(4) When two or more offenders are jointly convicted of committing one and the same offence and when there is reason to believe that they acted in concert, cross reference shall be entered in the remarks of the register drawing attention to the fact.
(5) When a convict has been classed `P.R` under rules the letters “P.K.” and a general description of the convict, giving age colour of hair marks, scars, peculiarities of speech and gait as endorsed on his “P.R.” slip shall be entered in column three.
When a person is re-convicted the fresh entry shall bear the same serial number in column one as the previous conviction. and the number of the conviction shall be entered below, it in the Form of a fraction e.g. 16/3 signifies the third conviction of the person originally entered at serial number 16. The serial number allotted to convict shall be a permanent one, just as a constabulary number is permanent. In the remarks column (column II) of each re conviction entry shall be entered references to the number, offence and page of entry of previous convictions.
Illustration

When the re conviction of a person having six previous convictions is made entry in column II shall be of the following nature ‘379 1/3; 457/-3/3 and 4571-3/3 6/9 110, Code of Criminal Procedure 2m and 4/3, 19 XI/78 5/8’. Here the first figure refers to the nature of the offence the numerator to the serial number of the conviction, and the denominator to the page of the register.
(7) Each entry shall be signed by the officer in charge of the Police station personally, the conviction slip being retained till this has been done At every inspection of a police station by a gazetted, officer, the conviction register shall be produced and the inspecting officer shall attest every entry made since the last inspection recording orders in column II regarding any action, such as the opening of a history sheet, which he may require to be taken. The inspecting officer shall also assure himself that orders given at taken. The inspecting officer shall also assure himself that orders given at previous inspections have been complied with, and shall erase or transfer the names of convicts, who are shown to his satisfaction to have died or permanently changed their residence.
3.49. Register Number (8), (9) and (10). – The surveilliance registers shall be maintained in accordance with the order contained in rules 44, 45 and 4,16.
Register numbers(8), (9) (10), shall be destroyed two years after the date of the last entry.
3.50. Register Number (II). – An index to history sheets and personal files will be maintained in forms 4.14 (1) Part I and 4.14(i) Part
3.51. Register Numbers (12) and (13). – The register of information sheets shall be maintained in the form and subject to the orders contained in rule 4.17 These registers shall be destroyed seven years after the dispatch or receipt of the last sheet.
3.52. Register Number (14). – Minute book for Gazetted officers.-
(1) This is a blank book of fool scape size in which shall be entered the dates of all inspections and matters requiring the attention of the officer in-charge of the police station which have not been entered in the inspection report. Inspecting officers shall satisfy themselves that old the police station, are intact.
(2) Notes should be made in this register of matters permanently affecting the condition of the police station, e.g. changes in police station or out post boundaries; imposition and removal of additional police posts; constructions of new buildings, etc.
(3) The register is a confidential and privileged record; with the exception of Gazetted police officer, no one except the District Magistrate may enter remarks in it or examine it.
3.53. Register Number (15)- File Book of Inspection Reports – A file book shall be maintained for record of gazetted officer’s inspection reports. Covers of standard pattern in which reports can be kept without risk of damage are obtainable through the annual indent for departmental forms. An index of inspection reports shall be maintained on the inside of the front cover.
3.54. Register Number (16). – This register shall contain 200 pages which shall be divided in four parts as follows:
Part I – List of village watchmen in the station jurisdiction, with the days fixed for their attendance at the police station in Form 3.54 Part I.
Part II – List of police officers attached to the police station with the dates of their appointment and transfer in Form 3.54 part II.
Part III – Register of all Government property in use at the police station in Form 3.54 A printed list of various kinds of articles supplied to police stations will be sent out to all police station before the 15th March and 15 September. This list will be completed (as regards the number of each article on charge) from the balances in part DI of this register and will be submitted every half-year to the reserve inspector or Lines officer before the 31st March and 30th September. A note will be attached explaining all changes from the list last submitted quoting the dates of and the authority for all receipts, transfers, destruction or other disposal of property.
Part IV. – List of all land in the police station jurisdiction which is Government property in the possession of the Police. The dimensions, area, locality, boundaries and boundary pillars of any place of worship or praying platform situated on police land shall be entered in this register. Such entries must correspond with the permanent record maintained at headquarters.
3.55. Register number(17).-Register of Licences. – This register shall be maintained in separate parts as follows:
Part I. – List of arms act licences sub-divided into five parts, in forms 3.55 Part I (1), part 1(2), part I(4) Part I(5).
Part II. – List of licences under the Excise Laws in Form 3.55 Part II.
Part III. – List of licences under the Explosives, Act, in form 3.55 Part III
Part IV. – List of licences under the petroleum Act, in form 3.55 Part
Part V. – List of licences under the poison Act in form 3.55 Part V.
Parts I to V, except form 3.54 Part I (4) may be destroyed one year after the expiration of the period for which the licences were granted.
3.56. Register number (18)-Receipts book for Arms, Ammunition and Military Stores. – A receipts book in Form 3.56 shall be maintained in which shall be entered a descriptive list in triplicate of all arms, ammunition or military stores deposited in, or seized and brought to, the police station when such seizure is not otherwise reported. the form shall be made out by the carbon copying process. One copy shall be affixed to the weapon or articles, and the duplicate shall be given to the depositor.
This book shall be destroyed five years after the date of last entry.
3.57. Register number (19).- The Store Room Register. – This register shall be maintained in form 3.57.
With the exception of articles already included in register number 16, every article placed in the store room shall be entered in this register and the removal of any such article shall be noted in the appropriate column.
The register may be destroyed three years after the date of the last entry.
3.58. Register number (20).-Cash Accounts – This register shall be maintained in Form 3.58 (a) and 3.58 (b).
(1) A cash account shall be kept of all receipts and expenditure. This account shall be kept separately in two parts as follows:
(a) Other money, such as receipts and disbursement of pay, travelling allowance, etc.

(b) Permanent advance.

(2) This account shall be balanced daily at the time fixed for the daily diary to close.
(3) At the end of the month any expenditure from the permanent advance, the recovery of which has been pending for over over a month, shall be specially detained.
(4) If the permanent advance becomes exhausted and further expenditure has to be incurred, the minus balance shall be shown in red ink. such minus balance shall be shown also in the daily diary. Gazetted officers shall ensure that such entries in diaries are specially brought to their notice so that prompt measures may be taken to place the account in credit and to deal with those responsible for delay in the refund of advances.
(5) A permanent advance is intended to provide, on the responsibility of the officer entrusted with it, for emergent petty advances of all kinds or for such Payments as have to be made in advance of drawing bills.
(6) The officer in-charge of the police station shall personally check the correctness of the cash account once a month and certify over his own signature in the register that he has done so.
3.59. Register number (21) File Book of Road Certificates – A bound book of road certificates in Form 3.59 containing sufficient certificates in duplicate to last for three months, shall be issued to each police station as required.
Each certificate, both office copy and duplicate, shall be given an annual serial number for each police station and, when returned receipted, the copy issued or the receipt in lieu thereof shall be pasted on to the place from which the copy issued was taken.
each book shall be destroyed when the last certificate therein is three years old.
3.60. Register number (22)-Printed Receipt Books – (1) Printed receipt books in form 3.60 each containing 100 receipt forms in duplicate shall be issued to each police station.
(2) The pages of such books shall have printed serial numbers office copies duplicates having the same numbers and only one such book shall be use at a time.
(3) It shall be duty of the station clerk to count and stamp with the station seal the receipts in the book before bringing it into use. Any receipt missing or bearing a wrong printed page number shall, before the book is brought into use, be brought to the notice to the officer in-charge of the police station and a report entered in the daily diary.
(4) For all sums of money received in a police station, whether in cash or otherwise on any account whatever, a receipt from this book shall be issued to the remitting party under the signature of the officer incharge of the police station or the station clerk. The officer signing the receipt shall satisfy himself that necessary entry has been made in the cash account which shall be duly attested under his initials at the same time.
(5) The road certificate if any, received with the money shall be pasted in place of the receipt issued in the receiving police station. the receipt issued in lieu thereof shall be pasted in the remitting office in place of the road certifiCate issued.
Note-A road certificates only an acknowledgement and not a receipt.

3.61. Register number (23)- Police Gazette, and (24)- Criminal Intelligence Gazette – The police Gazette and the Criminal Intelligence Gazette will be neatly filed in card-board covers immediately on receipt. All orders contained in the Gazette affecting the officers of the police station as a whole or any individual officer, shall be announced at the first roll call held after the receipt of the Gazette,-vide rule 3.11.
Gazetted Officers will see at inspections that these rules are carefully followed and that all orders. etc. in Gazette are properly dealt with.
3.62. Register Number (25) – Police Rules-All copies of Police Rules must be kept up to date and Gazette Officers shall see that this is done as soon as correction slips are received from the press.
3.63. Register number (26)-Charge notes of officers incharge of police stations – A blank register of full-scape size shall be maintained in every police station, in which the officer incharge of the police station on handing over charge on permanent transfer, shall record a confidential charge note for the assistance of his successor. This note should not recapitulate matter which is already on record in Part 4 of the village crime register or in other register of the police station, but should deal with miscellaneous local information, which the outgoing officer has gathered during his stay in the jurisdiction, and which would be lost to his successor if not recorded. Matters Which may suitably be mentioned in these charges notes are
(a) The character and capacity of members of the staff of the police station including notes of constable who are specially useful for particular types of work;

(b) Residents of jurisdiction who are useful to the police as informers or helpers and others who are particularly to be guarded against;

(c) Directions in which co-operation with other police stations is specially necessary owing to the habits of the criminals of one or other jurisdiction;

(d) Special factors affecting crime such as immigrations of labour, local customs or superstitions etc;

(e) Matters of temporary importance such as serious cases under investigation, preventive, action pending, or important order under compliance;

This list is not intended to be exhaustive, the object of confidential charge note is that miscellaneous information. Which the experience of successive officers accumulates, and which would not otherwise come on to record, should be available to new corners.
3.64. Station clerk as officer in-charge of the police station – In the absence of senior officers, the station clerk is frequently called upon to act as officer incharge of the police station. He must, therefore be fully acquainted with all powers, responsibilities and duties of that officer as laid down in the law and in police Rules. The most important of these and the most important of the other duties devolving on the station clerk and not already detailed in the chapter are
(1) registration of cognizable cases and action subsequent to registration Rule 5.1.
(2) recording of complaints in non-cognizable cases- Rule 5.3
(3) dispatch of special reports-Rule 5.11.
(4) disposal and completion of case files and completion of registers on the passing of orders in cases-Rule 8.22.
(5) carrying out arrests- Rule 7.8
(6) granting of bail-Rule 7.20.
(7) submitting applications for remands to police custody-Rule 7.25 (2)
(8) Patrolling at rural stations-Rule 4.1
(9) issuing orders on the use of handcuffs-Rule 7.22
In all these matters the station clerk will be guided by the rules referred to and connected law.
3.65. Visit of chowkidars to police station – (1) The visit of village watchmen to police stations mentioned in Rule 2.3(4) shall be so arranged that while no inconvenience is caused to be watchmen concerned. They shall arrive at the police station on different days as far as possible. Opportunity shall be taken of these visits by the police station staff to obtain local information of occurrences in villages, to disseminate intelligence relating to crime, absconders; etc, and to impart instructions as to the action required by village officials on the occurrence of crime etc.
(2) Officers in-charge of police station will be held responsible that village watchmen on their periodical visit to the police station are not detained, and that their services are not utilised in improper ways. Any disobedience of these orders must be severely dealt with and Gazetted Officers should personally enquiry when on tour and ensure that these instructions are strictly complied with.
3.66. Orders regarding notices – When it is considered necessary to record or communicate to other police stations information regarding unidentified corpses, missing persons, unclaimed, lost or stolen cattle or other property, notice in the forms given below shall be prepared by the carbon copying process and dispatched to the central Investigation Agency at head quarters and to such police stations as the officer in-charge of the police station thinks fit, care being taken that only property easy of identification is included

(a) Unidentified corpses-Form 3.66 (1)(a).

(b) Missing persons- Form 3.66 (1)(b).

(c) Unclaimed property, including cattle- Form 3.66 (1)(c).

(d) Property lost or stolen including cattle- Form 3.66 (1)(d).

(2) If the matter is urgent the necessary copies shall be made at and dispatched direct from the police station, otherwise notice shall be submitted to the Central Investigating Agency at headquarters where the required number of copies shall be made by means of duplicating process and dispatched without delay to such police stations of posts as the submitting officer may recommend and also, in exceptional cases where such a course is likely to prove effective to the office of Superintendent of Police. Crime, for publication in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette. In addition, in all important cases, the information should be communicated to the chowkidars visiting the police station with a view to its circulation throughout the jurisdiction of the police station.
(3) Office copies of the notices referred to shall be kept and these, as well as the notices received from other police station, shall respectively, be given an annual serial number under each class separately and filed for seven years in two bundles, one containing notices of the home police station and the other those received from other police stations.
(4) Notices shall be compared with a view to tracing missing persons owners of unclaimed property, establishing identity of unidentified corpses, etc. and results noted in the column of remarks.
(5) In the case of similar notices received from other districts or States, Superintendents shall exercise their discretion as to the police stations to which they should be circulated and the necessary number of copies shall be made in their own offices if duplicate copies are not received from the forwarding district.

CHAPTER IV

Prevention of Offences

4.1. Patrolling at rural stations – (1) The Officers incharge of police stations and Assistant Sub-Inspectors at those stations shall move about in their jurisdictions freely. They shall pay special attention to villages where crime has occurred, or where registered bad characters and suspects whose history sheets are on record live, but shall visit every village occasionally, for the purpose of adding to their local knowledge, becoming known to the people, collecting information, and checking the proper performance of their duties in relation to crime by chowkidars.
(2) Information regarding the mode of livelihood of bad characters shall be obtained mainly by personal visits and enquiry, but head constables and constables shall, from time to time, sent to village with definite orders to ascertain whether certain specified bad characters are present or not, and trace the whereabouts of proclaimed offenders of absconders.
Except or carry out definite orders constables shall not be deputed to visit villages. But they may be deputed to visit ferries, camping-ground, motor vehicle stands and other places of public resort for the purpose of collecting information, maintaining order or other police purpose.
4.2. Co-operation with railway police at stations – (1) Where possible a constable in plain clothes shall be deputed from the police station to each railway station within its jurisdiction to meet all trains which halt there and keep a look-out for bad characters and suspicious persons.
Constables who have special knowledge of local bad characters shall be selected for this duty.
(2) Particulars regarding any known or suspected bad character observed taking a ticket or travelling in a train shall be reported to the railway police, if any are on the platform also to the travelling constable.
(3) Any information received from the railway police regarding bad characters or suspicious persons alighting from a train shall be communicated to the officer incharge of police station.
4.3. Patrolling by villagers – The organization of ‘pahra’ on voluntary basis and ‘nakabandi’ is one of the most important duties of the officer incharge of a police station. Such an organization should be carefully planned with the object of providing the best protection against criminals and securing that duties are allotted fairly and with as little inconvenience to the individual as possible. Areas or locations or patrols and pickets should be carefully selected and the available strength of police should be disposed to the best advantage for assisting and supervising parties of villagers. Village official should be encouraged to participate actively in co-operation should be promptly rewarded. Gazetted Officers and Inspectors are required to take a close personal interest in this branch of preventive action.
Nakabandi shall on no account be regarded as a matter of routine Nakabandi is better worked on a voluntary basis, through the good will of the communities concerned. These services should be demanded temporarily and for special purposes only during epidemics of crime.
4.4. Surveillance Register No.,8 – (1) In every police station, other than those of the railway police, a Surveillance Register shall be maintained in form 4.4(1).
(2) In part I of such register shall be entered the names of persons commonly resident within or commonly frequenting the local jurisdiction of the police station concerned, who belong to one or more of the following classes :
(a) All persons who have been proclaimed under section 87, Code of Criminal Procedure.

(b) All released convicts in regard to whom. an order under section 565, Criminal Procedure Code, has been made.

(c) All convicts the execution of whose sentence as suspended in the whole, or any part of whose punishment has been remitted conditionally under section 401, Criminal Procedure Code.

(d) All persons restricted under Rules of Government mode under section 8 of the Rajasthan Habitual Offenders Act, 1953.

(3) In part II of such register may be entered at the discretion of the Superintendent : –
(4) Persons who have been convicted twice, or more than twice, of offences mentioned in rule 8.22;
(b) persons who are reasonably believed to be habitual offenders or receivers of stolen property whether they have been convicted or not;

(c) persons under security under sections 109 or 110, code of Criminal Procedure;

(d) convicts released before the expiration of their sentences under the Prisons Act and Remission Rules without imposition of any conditions.

Note:- This rule must be strictly construed, and entries must be confined to the names of persons falling in the four classes named therein.

4.5. Entries in and cancellation from Surveillance Register. – (1) The surveillance register shall be written up by the officer incharge of the police station personally of by an Assistant Sub-Inspector in a clear and neat script. No entry shall be made in Part II except by the order of the Superintendent, who is strictly prohibited form delegating this authority. No entry shall be made in Part I except by the order of a Gazetted Officer. Entries shall be made either under the personal direction of, on receipt of a written order from, an officer authorised by this rule to make them. In the latter case original shall be attached to the register until the entry has been attested and dated by a Gazetted officer.
(2) Ordinarily, before the name of any person is entered in Part II of the surveillance register, a history sheet shall be opened for such person.
If from the entries in the history sheet, the Superintendent is of opinion that such person should be subjected to surveillance he shall enter his name in Part II of the surveillance register; provided that the names of persons who have never been convicted or placed on security for good behaviour shall not be entered until the Superintendent has recorded definite reasons for doing so.
The record of such reason shall be treated as confidential and persons concerned shall not be entitled to a copy thereof.
4.6. Notice to Panchas. – When a sureveille has been declared a proclaimed offender a notice shall be issued to the sarpanch of the Village in which the sureille used to reside and the receipt of such information having been received by a Sarpanch shall be obtained. On the receipt of such notice the Sarpanch shall make utmost efforts to ascertain the whereabouts and to assist in the capture of the proclaimed offender.
4.7. Mode of surveillance.-(1) Police surveillance shall comprise such close watch over the movements of the persons under surveillance, by police officers, as village watchmen as may be practicable without any illegal interference.
(2) Care shall be taken not to have under surveillance in any police station more persons than the police station staff can reasonably be expected to watch efficiently.
4.8. Preparation of history sheet – The initial preparation of a history sheet requires great care, and should invariably be done by the officer in charge of the police station himself or by a thoroughly experienced. Assistant Sub-Inspector under specific orders.
(1) The description of the criminal should be such as will, enable the person reading it to form for himself a picture of the individual described special attention being given to peculiarities of appearances, gait, speech, etc by means of which the man may be distinguished.
(2) The space for ‘relations and connections’ should be filled in with a view to affording clues to those persons with whom the criminal is likely to harbour when wanted by the police, including relations or friends living at a distance from his home and his associates in crime, abetors and receivers. The particular nature of each person’s connection should be noted against each, and, when persons shown as connections themselves have history, sheets a cross reference with those sheets should be given.
(3) Under property, and mode of earning livelihood, such particulars should be entered as will facilitate a judgment as to whether the criminal in at any time living beyond his means, whether he is capable of furnishing a personal recognizance of any value, whether he is an owner of property, a tenant or wage-earner and so on.
(4) The ‘description of crime to which addicted’ should be in some detail, showing not merely the class of the crime, but the particular type of that crime, methods followed, localities chiefly frequented, weapons or instruments used etc.
When these particulars have been carefully and concisely entered, the initial entry on the reverse side of the form should be made in the form of a summary of individual’s career up to the date of this history sheet being prepared, and should include the particular reasons and authority for its being prepared. Copies of history sheets prepared and published by the Criminal Investigation Department and published in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette shall be filed with the history sheets of the persons concerned in their home police station. The police station history sheets in all such cases will be endorsed with the letters C.I.D. and the criminal’s state numbers in red ink. The activities of all such criminal subsequent to the publication of their history sheets must be communicated promptly to the Criminal Investigation Department Agency. Duplicate of the sheets of criminal known of suspected to operate on the railway shall be supplied to the nearest railway police station and the originals of such sheets shall be endorsed with the letters ‘R’ in red ink. The District police shall also supply the Railway Police Station with copies of all subsequent entries made in such History Sheets, so that the Railway Police copies may be kept strictly up to date.
4.9. History sheets when opened – (1) A history sheet, if one does not already exist, shall be opened in Form 4.9 for every person whose name is entered in the surveillance register, except conditionally released convicts.
(2) A history sheet may be opened by, or under the written orders of, a police officer not below the rank of Inspector for any person not entered in the surveillance registered who is reasonably believed to be habitually addicted to crime or to be an aider or abettor such persons.
(3) the Government Railway Police will maintain the history sheets of criminals known or suspected to operate on the railway in accordance with Police Rule 4.8. They will open history sheets themselves for criminals living in railway premises. who have been absent from their original homes so long that the railway premises may be regarded as their permanent residence. They may also open history sheets for wandering strangers reasonably believed to be habitually addicted to crime on the railway, whose original homes cannot be traced.
4.10. Custody of history sheets. – (1)The history sheets at each police station shall be kept in three separate bundles as follows :-
(a) Bundle containing the history sheets of persons whose names are entered in the surveillance register.

(b) Bundles containing the history sheets of persons whose names are not entered in the surveillance register and which have not been removed to personal files under rule 4.12. In this bundle should be recorded the history sheets of persons who (1) have been removed from surveillance on probation owing to their being no recent complaints against them, but who cannot be said definitely to be no longer addicted to crime, (2) have been the subject of action under rule 4.26, but have not yet been placed on security for good behaviour or under surveillance.

(c) Bundle containing the history sheets of bad characters undergoing sentences of imprisonment sufficiently long to justify the removal of their names from the surveillance register until their release. These history sheets shall be put up by the officer incharge of the police station before a gazetted officer for orders six months before the nominal date of the release of the bad character concerned.

(2) In each bundle, the history sheets of each village shall be kept in a separate cover on the inside of which a list of the history sheets pertaining to the village with their index serial numbers shall be maintained. The prescribed covers for history sheets are obtainable from the Director of Printing and Stationary Department, Rajasthan.
4.11. Checking of History Sheets. – Gazetted officers on tour and Inspectors shall personally check the entries in history sheets by local enquiry, in the presence of the persons concerned, and so far as possible, their homes, such officers shall also carefully scrutinie the conviction register (Rule 3.48), in order to see that history sheets are opened or property kept up, as the case may be, for all convicts, whose record justifies such action.
In checking history sheets of proclaimed offenders they shall make sure that constant all recent inquiries have been made to ascertain the proclaimed offenders whereabouts and to effect his capture. whether he be in the jurisdiction or elsewhere, and that all necessary information about the proclaimed offender and his associates has been obtained from or communicated to other districts and police stations.
4.12. Treatment of history sheets and personal files.(1)- The history sheet of a person who is no longer addicted to crime shall be transferred to his personal file. Under no circumstances shall the history sheet of person who is undergoing sentence be relegated to his personal file.
(2) The history sheet and personal file of a person who takes up his residence permanently in another police station jurisdiction shall be transferred to such police station.
(3) The history sheet and personal file of a person who dies shall be destroyed.
(4) All disposal actions referred to in this rule shall be taken in accordance with the order of a gazetted officer.
4.13. Personal files, maintenance and disposal of. – (1) The starting of a personal file should always be the first stage in compiling the record of a suspect. As soon as suspicious have come into record regarding an individual to an extent which indicates that he is addicted to crime or is the associate of criminals. such record should be tabulated to form the foundation of a personal file subsequently, all information obtained about such person, whether in his favour or against him. shall be added to his file. The personal file shall form the main material be which superior officers will be guided as to whether to open a history sheet or not, It follows that a personal file must be maintained for every person of whom a history sheet exists. On such file,bad character rolls, papers relating to information sheets etc., shall be recorded. (See rule 4.17(7)(b) in this connection)
(2) All personal files shall be paged and indexed.
(3) (a) The personal files of persons for whom history sheets have been opened shall be given the same serial number as the history sheet and kept separately in a bundle.
(b) The personal files of persons for whom no history sheet exists shall be kept in a separate bundle. These files shall not be numbered, but a list of them shall be kept in the bundle and they shall be arranged according to villages.

(4) To prevent the under accumulation of useless personal files, the Superintendent may, at his discretion, order the destruction of the personal file of any person of whom a history sheet does not exist when such person has been of good behaviour continuously for seven years and the up-keep of his personal file appears unnecessary.
4.14. Index to history sheets and personal files. – (1) A register containing a general index to history sheets and personal files shall be maintained in two parts.
Part I shall consist of a list in Form 4.14(1) Part I of the history sheets and personal files in serial orders as they are opened.
Part II be an alphabetical index in Form 4.14 (1) Part II
(2) When a history sheet is opened it shall be given a permanent serial number and entered in the general index. Such number shall not be altered when the history sheet is transferred from one bundle to another, and shall not be re-allotted until the history sheet is destroyed or transferred to another police station.
4.15. Part V of village Crime Register – To ensure that the confidential notes on village crime are kept up methodically and that information contained in them can be readily referred to, all entries should be classified under headings as follow:-
(i) Notes regarding influential individuals residents in or connected with the village, who habitually abet or share in the proceeds of crime or shelter criminals.

(ii) Special types of lawlessness or crime to which inhabitants of the village are addicted.

(iii) Notes on gangs, with cross reference in the books of other villages to which members of the same gangs belong, and particulars of the associates and methods of such gangs.

(iv) Notes on personal, land, communal and other feuds, which are liable to cause breaches of the peace or to effect evidence in investigations.

(v) Notes on fairs and similar occasions requiring the special attention of the officer incharge of the police station.

(vi) Notes on individual criminals which supplement and facilitate reference to history sheets for instance; list of habitual railway thieves, cattle thieves etc; with the localities they chiefly operate in;list criminals of other villages or jurisdictions who commit crime in the village.

(vii) A list of convicts released under Rajasthan Prisons (Shortening of Sentences) Rules, 1958.

(viii) A list of respectable inhabitants of village who have migrated to colony areas and who can provide important information regarding proclaimed offenders and absconders.

(ix) Convictions under section 124A and 153-A. Indian Penal Code.

4.16. Enquiry (Bad Character) Rolls- (1) Upon receipt of information regarding the departure of a person, who is under surveillance from his home or his residence, the officer incharge of the police station shall send a (enquiry bad character) roll prepared by the carbon copying process in Form 4.16 (1) (Police Station Register No. 10 A), to the officer incharge of the police station to whose jurisdiction such person is believed to have gone. A roll shall similarly be sent when credible information is received of the presence of a proclaimed offender in another police station.
(2) The Officer receiving the enquiry (bad character) roll shall acknowledge its receipts and shall take steps to ascertain whether the bad character has arrived within his jurisdiction and, if so,shall arrange to have his movements watched, or, in the case of a proclaimed offender arrest him and take suitable action against his harbourers.
A note of the movements and doings of the bad character shall be made in the roll, and if he moves on to another police station, the roll shall be forwarded to such police station and the same procedure followed. An entry regarding each such roll received shall be made in police station register No. X B Form 4.1 6(2).
(3) When the roll is received back the police station from which it was originally despatched a note of any useful information recorded therein shall be made in the history sheet and the roll field with the personal file, the acknowledgement referred to above being attached to the foil of the enquiry (bad character) roll. The date and time of the bad characters return to his home shall be verified and noted on the back of the roll before it is finally filed.
(4) If a notorious bad character or a convict, who has been classes P.R.T. under the rules (in the Police Finger Palm and Foot print Manual) absents himself and is likely to visit two or more district, a copy of his bad character roll shall be sent to the office of the superintendent and form 4.16(4) completed and submitted to the superintendent of Police, Crime for publication in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette.
When necessary, information regarding the movements of such persons may be communicated by telegraph.
(5) The district police shall send information by the quickest means to the Railway Police Station concerned about the absence of a bad character for whom the Railway Police Maintains a history sheet. Message Should be sent by telephone or telegram where possible and enquiry (bad character) rolls should be forwarded without delay. Information should also be given to the Superintendent of Police who will pass it on as quickly as possible to the Superintendent of Police, Government Railway Police.
4.17. Information sheets – (1) Information sheets in Form 4.17 (1) shall be used by an officer for the double purpose of obtaining and communicating information about residents of other police station jurisdictions who are known or believed to have visited his police station jurisdiction with criminal intent.
(2) Information sheets shall be issued by an officer, incharge of a police station as a means of ascertaining the antecedents of persons-
(a) Who are genuinely believed to have committed an offence whether or not they have been or are to be arrested;

(b) Who have been arrested under section 55, Criminal Procedure code.

(c) Who are genuinely believed to be of suspicious character.

The officer incharge of police station shall send an information sheet in Form 4.17(1) as soon as possible to the officer incharge of the police station of which such person claims to be resident, giving:-
(i) an account of the circumstances, in which such person came to notice.

(ii) an account of the offence if any with which such person is believed to be connected.

(iii) the names and a statement of the characters of the persons with whom such person has been associating, and

(iv) any statement made by such person about his own reputation and status and associates in his own jurisdiction and enter its dispatch in Police Station Register, No. XII Form 4.17(2).

(3) Continuation information sheets shall be issued whenever necessary as a means of communicating information obtained or genuine suspicions formed after the issue of the original information sheet.
(4) Final information sheet shall be issued as soon as possible after the conclusion of the police investigation, or of the judicial trial or of the magisterial proceedings. Such final reports shall as far as possible be drafted by the officer incharge of the police station himself and shall be summary of the whole matter, giving in detail the result of the investigation or trial of proceedings, the names of co-accused or associates, if any;the names of sureties and of discredited defence witnesses, if any; the place if any where property was recovered or absconders found, and any other facts that may be of value for criminal intelligence records.
(5) Information sheets, original, continuation and final, shall be issued in triplicate. the officer incharge of the police station shall send one copy to the Superintendent of Police of his own District to enable the criminal investigation Agency to extract any information of value, and shall send the other two copies to the officer incharge of the police station.
(6) The officer incharge of a police station receiving an information sheet in duplicate shall cause an entry to be made to register XIII (Form No. 4.17 (6), the index of information sheets received. He shall then record on the back of the copies all the information about the person, such as his antecedents, relations and associates as may help the enquiring officer in his investigation or in his search for absconders or for co-accused or for stolen property. One copy shall then be returned to the enquiring officer and the other copy shall be filed in the police station receiving the information sheets.
(7) (a) In the Police station issuing the information sheets of persons finally considered to be of criminal of suspect character shall be filed in bundles according to the village visited by such person, and within such village bundle according to the type of crime to which they are suspected of addiction.
(b) In the police station receiving the information sheets of persons finally considered to be of criminal or suspect character shall be filed with their personal files, if any, if there is no personal file, and if none is started on receipt of the information sheet, it shall be filed according to the village of residence and within the bundle relating to such village according to the type of crime of which the persons is suspected.

(c) In both issuing and receiving Police Station Information sheets of persons finally considered to be of good character shall be destroyed.

4.18. Hue and Cry notices. – (1) Whenever it is required to have a search made for an absconding suspect, or to issue warnings for precautions to be taken against a particular type of offences or particular individuals, the officer incharge of the police station Or the investigating officer, shall, in addition to such action as may be taken in accordance with rules 7.5 issue a hue and cry notice in Form 4.18(1). The officer who decides to issue such a notice shall personally complete the original form, recording all descriptive and other information which may assist the recipient of the Form to take effective action paying particular attention to the specification of the routes and places to be watched. He shall cause the original form to be conveyed as speedily as possible to the police station, with precise instruction as to where copies are to be sent after the necessary entry has been made in Register No. (4). Hue and cry notices shall not be broadcast indiscriminately, but shall be sent with the utmost despatch to those places whether within or outside the jurisdiction of issue. Where special action is required. In all cases, when an absconder is likely to travel by railway, copies .of hue and cry notices shall be sent to the railway police stations and outposts concerned.
(2) A copy of every hue and cry notice of an absconder shall also be sent to the office of the Superintendent of Police, in order that an entry may he made in the district register of absconders (Rule 4.20) and that, if the superintendent of Police or head of the prosecuting branch think fit copies may be sent to other districts or to the Criminal Investigation Department.
(3) In cases where the absconder is known to have associates, relatives, or resorts in two or more districts and when the offender is not immediately arrested, a notice in Form 4.18(1) shall be sent to the Superintendent of Police, Crime, for publication in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette. In case where a reward is offered the amount should be stated on the form.
(4) Officers incharge of police station receiving hue and cry notices shall take immediate action, as the circumstances of each case may indicate to be necessary.
(5) Care shall be take that, whenever the necessity for action asked for in a hue and cry notice ceases to operate, a notice of cancellation shall be issued to all to whom the Original notice was sent.
4.19. Dissemination of intelligence of serious offences – (1) In cases of murder by dacoits or robbers, drugging with intent to rob, dacoity serious robbery and serious offences involving interference with the working of the railway, when the culprits are not immediately apprehended, the officer incharge of the police station shall send written notices, or telephone or telegraph messages, to neighbouring police stations and to such other police stations as are concerned, whether in the same district or not, giving all particulars likely to afford a clue to the offenders. He shall also arrange for the dissemination of such intelligence throughout his jurisdiction.
(2) In order that this rule 4.18 above, shall be promptly complied with, officers incharge of police stations shall have ready a system by which intelligence can be quickly disseminated. They shall use for this purpose any telephone and telegraph system existing. the visits of chaukidars and other persons to police stations, the post office and any other existing local means.
4.20. District Register of absconders – (1) In each district a register of absconders in Form 4.20 (1) shall be maintained by the head of the prosecuting agency. The register shall be divided into two parts:-
Part I – Will contain the names of all absconders in cases of the home district, irrespective of their residence about whom information in form 3.44(a), or otherwise, has been received.
Part-II – Will contain the names of absconders in cases of other district who are resident of the home district or likely to visit it. All entries regarding residents of the home Districts shall be made in red ink.
The names in both parts shall be entered, as far as possible, according to the police stations of which the absconder is resident or from which he is absconding.
As soon as an absconder has been proclaimed under section 87, Code of Criminal Procedure, his name shall be entered in the Proclaimed offenders register prescribed in Rule 4.22 (1) a note being made in the column for remarks to this effect.
(3) Should action under section 87, Code of Criminal Procedure, not be taken against an absconder for any reason, such as lack of evidence, etc, his name shall be struck out and a remark added giving reasons in the column for remarks.
(4) When a person whose finger impression slip is on record absconds, information of the fact shall be sent to the finger Print Bureau. Al re-arrested of such absconders shall be communicated to the finger Print Bureau.
(5) When a habitual offender, as defined in Rajasthan Habitual Offenders Act absconds, information of the fact together with as many particulars of the individuals as possible, shall be communicated promptly to Superintendent of Police, Crimes All re-arrest of such absconders shall also be communicated to that officer.
4.21. Register showing progress of action against absconders and proclaimed offenders. – In order that a proper check may be kept on the progress of action prescribed in rules 2.5 and 7.5, the head of the prosecuting agency, shall maintain a register form 4.21. The register shall be examined at frequent intervals by the Superintendent of Police, gazetted officers and inspectors in supervisory charge of police stations and by prosecuting officers, and the latter shall be held responsible that no delay in proclamation and attachment of property of perfunctory action in regard thereto, whether on the part of police officer or the court, is allowed to occur.
4.22. Register of proclaimed offenders. – (1) A register of proclaimed offenders in Form 4.22(1) shall be maintained in each district by the head of the prosecuting agency. The register shall be into two parts:-
Part I. – Shall contain the names of all residents of the home-district irrespective of the district in which proclaimed. the names shall be entered according to the police station of which the proclaimed offenders are resident.
Part II. – Shall contain the names of all offenders proclaimed in but not resident of the district. These will be entered, as far as possible, according to the district of which they are said to be resident, residents of independent territory being shown separately.
(2) In January of each year a statement in Form 4.22 (2) shall be submitted to the Deputy Inspector General, Criminal Investigation Department showing the result or action taken against proclaimed offenders during the past years. An abstract of such a statement shall be prepared in the office of the Deputy Inspector General, Criminal Investigation Department, and published in the Police Gazette. They figure relating to proclaimed offenders, who are registered as habitual offenders shall be given separately.
4.23. Revision of lists of proclaimed offenders. – (1) Every Superintendent shall carefully revise his list of proclaimed offenders periodically and omit therefrom, after consultation with the District Magistrate and the Superintendent of district in which such person was proclaimed, the names of persons accused of trivial offences or concerned in cases where, from lapse of time, no sufficient evidence is on record or is procurable.
(2) Due intimation of such omission shall be sent to the officer incharge of the police station concerned; intimation shall also be sent to the Deputy Inspector General, Criminal Investigation Department, in these case in which intimation of proclamati9n was given or in which a notice issued in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette.

4.24. Procedure when person is proclaimed an offender – (1) immediately proceedings under section 87, Criminal procedure Code, have been taken, intimation shall by the prosecuting agency to the station initiating such proceedings & to proclaimed offender in believed to be a resident through the superintendent of Police if a resident of another district. The primary responsibility for securing the arrest of such offender rests with the police of the station in which he is a resident. Immediately on receipt of intimation of proclamation of a resident of the police station jurisdiction a history sheet shall be opened, particulars being ascertained from the police station, which has instituted proclamation proceedings. If necessary and the offender’s name shall be entered in Part I of the Surveillance Register.
(2) Thereupon intimation in form 4.24 (2) shall be sent to the watchman of the village of which the proclaimed offender is a resident, and intimation in the same form shall be sent separately, and through the police stations concerned, to the watchman of all villages where the proclaimed offender is known to have relatives or friends whom he is likely to visit. When the offender is a resident of a police station other than in which he is proclaimed, the officer incharge of the latter police station shall immediately furnish the police station of the offender’s residence with all available information for the completion of his history sheet and issue of notices.
(3) Whenever a proclaimed offender is arrested, intimation shall be sent direct to the district and police station of which he was a resident. On receipt of such intimation a note shall be made in the surveillance register, and the date and place of arrest, and his name shall be struck off the register, and intimation issued respecting him shall be withdrawn and his history sheet submitted for orders of disposal.
4.25. List of proclaimed offenders at Police Station. – (1) A list shall be hung up in the office of each police station, and a duplicate thereof in a conspicious place station notice board, of all proclaimed offenders whose names have been entered under rule 4.5 above in the surveillance register.
(2) Every police officer shall be instructed, as soon as possible after joining a police station, the names, descriptions and likely resorts of all proclaimed offenders included in the list prescribed above. Police Officers shall be frequently tested by officers incharge of police stations and inspecting officers in their knowledge’ of proclaimed offenders and shall be required at all times, when moving about the jurisdiction, themselves to obtain all possible information which may facilitate the arrest of such offenders and to inform the public of the proclamation of arrest and of any reward offered, and warn them of the penalties of harbouring.
4.26. Proceedings under section 110, [Criminal Procedure Code (Act V of 1898)] – When the history sheet of a bad character furnishes sufficient material, a report shall be prepared in Form 4.26 with a view to his being called upon to furnish security under section 110, Code of Criminal Procedure, or restricted under the provisions of the Rajasthan Habitual Offenders Act (9 of 1953.)
The preparation of such reports shall not be undertaken without the orders of a gazetted officer or Inspector. When possible a number of such cases shall be prepared and connected for presentation to the magistrate of the Hap on tour at some place near the home of the accused persons and witnesses.
4.27. Surveillance records confidential – All records connected with police surveillance are confidential nothing contained in them may be communicated to any person nor may inspection be allowed or copies given, save as provided in Police Rules. the rules regarding their production in court are contained in Chapter VIII.
4.28. Preventive action under sections 151 and 107, Code of Criminal Procedure – Section 151, Code of Criminal Procedure empowers a police officer knowing of a design to commit any cognizable offence to arrest the person so designing, if it appears to such officer that the commission of the offence cannot otherwise be prevented.
They are the only circumstances under which the law empowers police officer to interfere in disputes between individuals where interested parties, of village officials, complaint of apprehension of a breach of the peace.
Police officers, have no power to investigate formal complaints under section 107, Code of Criminal Procedure, except as provided in section 23, Act V of 1861. They shall, however, be on the constant look out for genuine information of disputes likely to lead to a breach of the peace. Such information, whether collected direct or received by complaint at the police station, shall be recorded in the daily diary, and a copy of the complaint forwarded without delay to the magistrate of the ilaqa, unless an immediate breach of the peace is anticipated, when the officer incharge of the police shall act under section 151, Code of Criminal Procedure, on his own responsibility. government has held that it is important that magistrates receiving such reports from the Police should give immediately to them their close and personal attention and take suitable action on the merits of each report.
Complaints of this nature made to superior police officers shall not be endorsed for enquiry by officers incharge of police stations unless it is anticipated that action under section 151, Code of Criminal Procedure, will be required and in no case shall, endorsed complaints be despatched to officers incharge of Police Station by hands of the complainants or the informants or otherwise that through a strictly official agency. Complainants in cases in which no action under section 151, Code of Criminal Procedure, appears necessary shall be referred to the magistrate of the ilaqa.
4.29. Convicts released before expiration of sentences under the prisons Act & remission rules. – The Government of India have decided that all remissions earned under the remission rules by prisoners of any class in jail are to be considered absolute and not to be made,subject to the imposition to any condition.
As it is desirable, however, for the police to the apprised of the release of such convicts, a descriptive roll in Form 4.29 of all such convicts will be sent by the Superintendent of the Jail to the Superintendent of Police of the District, of which the convict is a resident. The Superintendent of Police, shall in an examination of all the relevant circumstances exercise his discretion as to whether any such convict shall be subjected to police surveillance or not or whether preventive action is to be taken by the preparation of a history sheet or a personal file.
4.30. Convicts conditionally released under section 401, Criminal Procedure Code. – (1) When a convict is to be conditionally released under section 401, Criminal Procedure Code the Superintendent of Police will be supplied by the State Government through the district Magistrate with-
(a) A certified copy of the order of conditional release with the date of released endorsed on it, and

(b) A descriptive roll of the convict.

(2) If release is subject to conditions of police surveillance, the rules framed by Government in this regard shall be applied.
(3) If release is subject to other conditions and police are required to take measures to secure the observant of these conditions, the Superintendent of Police shall issue suitable order and instructions to subordinate officers concerned.
4.31. Conditional release under the Probation of Offenders Act, 1958. – The selection of convicts for probational release and their control shall be in accordance with the terms of the Act and the Rules framed thereunder. The police have no powers or duties in this respect. The chief Probation Officer shall inform the Superintendent of Police of the District where he is to be employed prior to the release of the prisoner. A list of such convicts shall be maintained by the officers incharge of police stations concerned in their confidential note Book. No surveillance shall be exercised by the police over such persons who should be given every opportunity to take their places as respectable members of society. but officers incharge of police stations shall report, through the Superintendent of Police, to the nearest Probation Officer any reliable information received regarding the commission of crime, absence or other breach of the conditions of release by them.
The Probation Officer may call upon the Superintendent of Police to enquiry into conduct of convicts released on probation and to render assistance in tracing, arresting and escorting to jail, persons who have contravened the conditions of their bond. Such requests shall be complied with.
4.32. Release of notice of prisoners. – The following instructions regarding the disposal of release notice shall be observed:-
(1) The release notice of prisoners classed P.R.T. shall be forwarded by the Superintendent of Jail direct to the Superintendent of Police, CID, Crime Branch, at least two months before the date of release.
(2) The release notices of prisoners classed P.R. shall be made over by the Superintendent of the Jail from which such prisoners are to be released to an officer to be specially deputed for the purpose by the local Superintendent of Police. In the case of persons to be released from the jail of the district in which they were convicted, the release notices shall be made over to the police on the Saturday preceding the dates of release. In the case of persons to be released in a district other than in which they were convicted, the release notices shall be made over to the police at least one month prior to the dates of release.
4.33. Procedure when release notices are received. – (1) P.R.T. Convicts-
(a) On receipt of the release notice of P.R.T. convicts, the Superintendent of Police, C.I.D. Crime Branch, Rajasthan, shall take such action as may be necessary in his office and shall them forward the notices in Original, by registered post, to the Superintendent of Police of District of which the criminal is a resident. The latter officer, on its receipt, shall cause it to be entered at once in the district finger Print Register (Prescribed in Finger Palm and Foot Print Manual) and shall cause translations in Form 4.33 (1) to be despatched to the police station of conviction if the convict was convicted in his district, and to the police station of residence as in accordance with rules all convicts classed R.T. are required to be released from the jails of their home districts.

(b) If the convict is a resident of another State, an extract of the release notice shall be forwarded by the Superintendent of Police, C.I.D., Crime Branch, Rajasthan to the Criminal Investigation Department of the State Concerned.

(c) If the criminal is a resident of the Rajasthan, but of a district, other than that in which he was convicted, the superintendent of the Police, C.I.D., Crime Branch, Rajasthan shall also forward a copy of the release notice to the district of conviction.

(2) P.R. Convicts.-On receipt under rule 4.32(2) of release notices of prisoners classed as P.R. the following procedure shall be observed:-
(a) In the case of a person to be released in the districts, of which he is a resident and in which he was convicted, necessary entries shall be made in the District Finger Print Register, information in Form 4.33(1) shall be sent to the police station of residence without delay, but the release notice shall be filed.

(b) In the case of a person to be released in the district, of which he is a resident on expiry of a sentence inflicted in another district, the Police Station of residence shall be informed in Form 4.33 (1), a duplicate copy of the release notice shall be prepared and forwarded without delay to the district of conviction for completion of the District Finger Print Register and the Original release notice shall be filed.

(c) In the case of a person to be released in the district in which he was convicted but he is a resident of another district in Rajasthan a duplicate copy of the release notice shall be prepared, necessary entries shall be made in the finger Print Register and the original release notice sent to the district of residence to be filed. If the convict is a resident of a State other than that of Rajasthan, or is of unknown residence, or has not fixed residence, the original release notice shall be retained and filed. All such notices shall be kept together in a separate file.

The release notice of a prisoner who has died shall be forwarded by the Superintendent of Police of the district of which the prisoner was a resident to the Finger Print Bureau for disposal and the name of such person shall be erased from the conviction register.
4.34. Surveillance over released prisoners – (1) Within ten days of a prisoner’s release the officer incharge of the Police Station of residence shall report whether or not be has return to his home.
(2) If the release notice refers to a convict classed P.R.T. the Superintendent shall take suitable measures to have such convict shadowed and shall note the substance of any orders is used in this connection in Form 4.33 (1) sent to the Police Station.
(3) Should a release notice refer to a person convicted of an offence on the Railway an extract shall be sent by the Superintendent of the district of which such criminal is resident to the Superintendent Government Railway Police.
4.35. Released convicts with regard to whom order under section 565, Code of Criminal Procedure, has been made – (1)The mode of surveillance over released convicts in regard to whom an order under section 565, Code of Criminal Procedure, has been made shall be according to the rules framed by the Government in this regard.
(2) Changes of residence of such convicts shall be entered in their history sheets and reports thereof made in form 4.35(2).
(3) On the expiration of the period for which the surveillance of a released convict is ordered the Superintendent shall exercise his discretion as to whether such prisoner’s name shall be transferred to Part II of the Surveillance Register or not.
4.36. Control of Professional Criminals. – (1) Files of important cases of a special type shall be maintained in the Crime Branch of Criminal Investigation Department, together with History Sheets of Important State Criminals, and a brief account of the offences for which convicted. The class of offences in which records are to be maintained are :-
(a) Administering stupefying drugs with intent to rob;

(b) Offences relating to coin, counterfeiting coin and the forgery of Government Currency Notes;

(c) Professional Cheating;

(d) Dacoities and offence committed by professionals, such as gang burglaries;

(e) Theft of arms and ammunition;

(f) Offences indicating a special technique.

(2) Reports of such cases, containing all important particulars shall be forwarded by Superintendent of Police to the Superintendent of Police, C.I.D., Crime Branch as they occur.
4.37. Distribution of professional criminals – On the conviction of a gang of professional criminals the Superintendent shall, if the considers such a course advisable, forward to the Superintendent of the Jail for submission to the Inspector General of Prisons a recommendation giving the names of members of the gang who should be separated and confined in different jails.
A copy of such recommendation shall be forwarded to the Deputy Inspector-General, Criminal Investigation Department.
4.38. Immigrants – Certain sections of immigrants to Rajasthan are addicted to crime; all such immigrants, whether nomadic or settled in towns and villages, should therefore be observed, and enquiry should be made with a view to ascertaining their antecedents. Should any such immigrants be suspected of criminal propensities, information should be sent; as early as possible, to the Superintendent of police, Crimes, who is in a position to supply the district police with the services of an experienced officer.
4.39. Control of traffic in Police Station jurisdictions – Police officers attached to Police Station shall pay attention to the control of traffic on the roads of their jurisdiction. It is part of the duty of officers present at Police station to take legal action in respect of traffic offences committed by traffic passing the station house and similarly themselves to take cognisance of or report all such offenders, which may come to their notice while travelling in their jurisdiction.
By constant warnings and prosecutions under the appropriate section of the Indian Penal Code, or special laws, in flagrant or recalcitrant cases, the amenities of traffic can and shall be ensured. The keeping of slow-moving traffic to the side of road; the prevention of obstructions of the road by gross overloading of carts; the prevention of cruelty to animals and over loading tongs; the enforcement of the rules under which public motor vehicles are allowed to ply, especially in respect of authorised loads, display of the required particulars on vehicles, validity of permits and driving licenses, and legibility and correct position of registration plates are all part of the duties of the staff of police station. Supervising officials shall insist on the proper performance of these duties.

CHAPTER V

Information to the Police

5.1. First information how recorded – (1) Sections 154 and 155, Code of Criminal Procedure, provide that every information relating to an offence, whether cognizable, or non-cognizable, shall be recorded in writing by the officer incharge of police station.
(2) With the exception of cases mentioned in rule 58, in every case in which the officer incharge of a police station, form information or otherwise, has reason to suspect the commission of an offence, which he is empowered under section 156, Criminal Procedure Code, to investigate, he shall enter in full such information or other intelligence as soon as practicable in the First Information report Register, shall have each copy signed, marked or sealed by the informant, if present, shall seal each with the station seal, and shall dispose of the copies in accordance with rule 5.5 and if he abstains from investigation under either of the provisions to section 157 of the Code he shall submit the copy intended for the Magistrate through the superintendent. At the same time a reference to such report shall be entered in the Station diary Register No.2.
(3) All such entries shall, if possible, be made by the officer incharge himself, and, if not so possible, by the station clerk under his direction, Short lists of property stated to have been transferred by the offence may be entered in the report, as also details of any property recovered without search under section 103 Code of Criminal Procedure, but detailed lists of property so transferred or recovered on search shall be entered in the first case diary submitted in the case.
(4) When it is necessary to question a person bringing information of the commission of an offence, special attention shall be paid to the following matters and the result of the inquiries shall be clearly recorded in the first information report :-
(a) The sources from which the information was obtained and the circumstances under which the informant ascertained the names of the offenders and witness (if any are mentioned).

(b) Whether the informant was an eyewitness to the offence.

5.2. Written reports by Village Panchayat – (1) Whenever a written report of a cognizable offence is received at a police station, it shall be attached to the copy of the First Information Report which is retained in the police station and copies shall be attached to the duplicates, provided that only the check receipt prescribed by the form need to be sent to the complainant. The Original written report shall be detached from the police station copy of the First Information Report and attached to the charge sheet or final report when the investigation is completed. When a case is sent up on an incomplete charge sheet the original report shall be similarly attached.
(2) A notice in Hindi shall be prominently displayed in every police station in the State, drawing the attention of the public to the fact that the payment of gratuities by the public to police officials for recording complaints is strongly, disapproved by Government. The notice shall state as briefly as possible that police officials are the servants of the public and paid by it, and that acceptance of gratuities is strictly forbidden by the rules of the police department and renders defaulters liable to serious penalties. The notice shall conclude with an admonition that demands for such gratuities should be invariably resisted and reported to the Superintendent of Police.
5.3. Action on report of non-cognizable offence- Where the information relates to a non-cognizable offence, it shall be briefly but intelligibly recorded in the station diary, shall be signed, sealed or marked by the person making it on both foil and counterfoil, and all particulars required by section 44 of Police Act (Act V to 1861) shall also be noted. A copy of the entry in diary made by the carbon copying process and signed and sealed with the station seal by the recording officer, shall be made over to the informant who shall be referred to the Magistrate in accordance with section 155, Code of criminal Procedure.
5.4. Action when reports are doubtful – (1) If the information or other intelligence relating to the alleged commission of a cognizable offence is such that an officer incharge of a police station has reason to suspect that the alleged offence has not been committed, he shall enter the substance of the information or intelligence in the station diary and seal record his reasons for suspecting that the alleged offence has not been committed and shall also notify to the informant, if any, the fact that he will not investigate the case or cause it to be investigated.
(2) If the Inspector or other superior officer, on receipt of a copy of the station diary, is of opinion that the case should be investigated, he shall pass an order to that effect.
(3) When a counterfeit currency note is found in circumstances which indicate that owing to absence of guilty knowledge on offence under section 489-B, Indian Penal Code or cognate section 154, Criminal Procedure Code, in the station diary; the special report required by rule 513 shall be submitted and enquiry shall be made to trace the point in the movements of the note at which a cognizable offence appears to have been committed. When reasonable suspicion of such commission arises a First Information Report shall be recorded in the Police Station Concerned and investigation under section 157, Criminal Procedure code, shall be made.

5.5. First Information Report Register – (1) The First Information Report Register shall be printed book in form 5.5 (1) consisting of 200 pages and shall be completely filed before a new one is commenced cases shall bear an annual serial number in each police station for each calendar year. Every four pages of the register shall be numbered with the same number and shall be written at the same time by means of the carbon copying process.
The original copy shall be permanent record in the police station. the other three copies shall be submitted as follows
(a) One to the superintendent of Police or other gazetted officer nominated by him.

(b) One to the magistrate empowered to take cognizance of the offence as is required by section 157, Criminal Procedure Code.

(c) One to the complainant unless a written report in Form 5.5 (1) (d) has been received in which case the check receipt prescribed will be sent.

(2) In case relating to cognizable offences triable by Panchayat one extra copy of the first information report shall be prepared on plain paper bearing the seal of the police. Station, and shall be sent to the Panchayat concerned for information, mention being made in the body of the F.I.R. that this action is being taken.
(3) In the case of the railway police, the copy intended for the Magistrate empowered to take cognizance of the offences shall be submitted through the Superintendent of the district police, provided that a railway police station, other than district headquarters stations, where there is a magistrate having jurisdiction, one copy shall be sent to such magistrate direct, one to the Deputy Superintendent of the Railway Police and an other to superintendent of District Police. The extra copy required in such cases will be made by inserting an extra sheet of paper and carbon paper and afterwards filling in the printed headings, etc;by hand.
(4) All information required by the form shall be filled in, and thereafter the serial number of each case diary submitted shall be noted on the reverse of the original copy which is to remain at the police station.
(5) On the conclusion of the case the particulars contained in the charge sheets slip shall be filled in on the reverse of the original copy and the slip returned to the superintendent’s office.
5.6. Cancellation of cases – Unless the investigation of a case is transferred to another police station or district, no first information report can be cancelled without the orders of a magistrate of the I class.
When information or other intelligence is recorded under section 154, Criminal Procedure Code and, after investigation, is found to be maliciously false or false owing to mistake of law or fact or to be non cognizable or matter for a civil suit, the Circle Officer shall send the first information report and any other papers on record in the case with the final report to a magistrate having jurisdiction and being a magistrate of the first class, for orders of cancellation. On receipt of such an order the officer incharge of the police station shall cancel the first information report by drawing a red line across the page, noting the name of the magistrate cancelling the case with number and date of order. He shall then return the original order to the Circle Officer’s Office to be filed with the record of the case.
5.7. Register of Petty offences – A book, to be called register of Petty Offences consisting one hundred blank pages with printed headings, in Form 5.7 shall be kept up as a permanent record at each police station where there is a resident magistrate having power to entertain complaints of the offences hereinafter mentioned, and whose headquarters is either-
(i) a town to which section 34 of Act V of 1861 has been extended.

(ii) a military cantonment.

(iii) a place outside the limits of military cantonment to which any of the rules and regulations for such cantonment have been lawfully extended.

5.8. Register of Petty Offences Classes of Offences to be entered – The offences which may be recorded in the register mentioned, and which are referred to in last preceding rule, are :-
(1) cognizable offences under municipal by-laws;
(2) offences under section 34 of police act (Act V of 1861) committed in the view of a police officer;
(3) cognizable offences under cantonment rules and regulations.
5.9. Register of Petty Offence-Procedure – (1) The register of Petty Offences shall be sent daily whenever offences are reported and when the courts are open to the magistrate empowered to take cognizance of them.
No first information report, case diary or charge sheet shall be submitted in such cases.
(2) A return shall be submitted from such police stations as maintain the register at the end of each month to circle officers showing the entries in the register and annual return shall be submitted to District superintendent of Police through the Circle Officer.
Such return shall be recorded by the return writer in the general crime register.
5.10. Special reports from police stations – (1) Every officer incharge of a police station shall, as soon as possible after he receives information of the commission within his jurisdiction of an offence mentioned in the Subjoined table, submit a special report in Form 5.10 to the officer or officers, mentioned in the third column of the table; provided that if a first information report containing the same information is required by law to be sent to any such officer, and is sent with equal dispatch, no special report need be sent to the officers who receive first information reports.
(2) special reports and first information reports sent in lieu of them shall be enclosed in red envelopes. In case of non-availability of red envelopes, the envelope shall be marked in red ink as containing special report.
5.11. Dispatch of Special reports – Officers incharge of police station shall be held responsible for communicating special reports with the greatest possible dispatch to the officers concerned and in serious cases shall made free use of the telegraph and telephone and radio communication.
5.12. Special Reports by Superintendents – (1) Every Superintendent shall, as soon as possible after he receives information of the occurrence within his jurisdiction of a case mentioned in the table sub-joined in this rule submit special reports in Form 5.12 to :-
(i) the District Magistrate;

(ii) the Deputy Inspector General of Police of the Range;

(iii) the officer mentioned in the third column of the table; and

(iv) any neighbouring Superintendent, whom he considers should be informed of the occurrence.

(2) The officers to whom special reports are forwarded in accordance with this rule shall be detailed on each copy of the report.
(3) Officers shall be responsible that special reports are concisely and intelligently written and that developments of the case and important stages in its progress are promptly reported by continuation special report.
5.13. Forgery of currency notes and coining cases – In special reports of forgeries of stamps, fraudulent alterations and re use of stamps full particular of the case shall be given, and specimens of the fraudulents tamps shall, if available, be sent with such reports to Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department.
(2) In cases of counterfeiting coin, the reports should contain full information on the following points :-
(i) The represented value of the coins which are counterfeits, i.e., counterfeits of a rupee, and 25 paisa and 50 paisa coin pieces;

(ii) The date on the counterfeit coin;

(iii) Whether cast in a mould ; or

(iv) Struck between dies;

(v) Good, bad, or indifferent, if bad or indifferent, why so considered i.e., want of sharpness, ring different from that of a true coin, or other cause;

(vi) Metal of which made and percentage of metal;

(vii) If Superintendent of opinion from the facts before him that any person arrested is an habitual dealer in false coin?

Explanation- The information under sub-rule (2) (vi) above will be obtained from personal observation, a local inquiry from a silversmith, or otherwise, as may be practicable. In all cases where the coins appeal or have been struck from a die and are good imitations a specimen of the counterfeit coin or coins should, if possible sent to the Master of the Mint, India Government Mint, Alipur, Calcutta for report, and when his report is received a copy should be sent by continuation special report. All coins to be assayed should be sent direct to the Mint Master, Calcutta and not through the Inspector-general.
(3) On the appearance in any district of any forged currency note of Rs. 10/- or more in value, or of any new forgery of a currency note of any value, the Superintendent shall send a copy of the special report required by the rules above to the Master, Indian Security Press, Currency Note Press, Nasik Road. Such reports shall state whether the note is process made or hand drawn and given the denomination of the forged note the circle; the date, the serial letter, the number and the consecutive number, continuation and final report shall be submitted to the Criminal Investigation Department in duplicate giving particulars of the notes passed and the modus operandi of the forgerers or utterers and of other persons concerned. On the completion of the police enquiry, the note shall be send to the Master, Indian security press, Currency Note Press, Nasik Road, through the Criminal Investigation Department together with a report explaining the facts. Special reports of forgeries of currency notes. or of the appearance of forged currency notes of less than Rs. 10/- in value are not required in the list case of old forgeries which have come to notice before and have appeared or printed in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette, but a list of the presentation of all such forgeries of notes of less than Rs. 10/- in value should be submitted on the first of each month, together with the notes in question to the Master, Indian Security Press, Currency Note Press, Nasik Road, through the Criminal Investigation Department.
5.14. Continuation and final reports – (1) each successive special report in the same case shall bear the same number as the first report and shall be distinguished by the addition of a capital. Roman letter in the order of the alphabet.
Illustration – The first special report of the murder of X is No. 20 The next special report shall be numbered 20A, the next B and so on.
(2) Successive special reports shall be submitted regularly as prescribed from time to time.
(3) a final report shall be submitted without delay in all cases when (a) the investigation is dropped or (b) the case is finally decided in court.
5.15. Record of special Reports – A separate file shall be opened for each case and should be regularly checked.

CHAPTER VI

Investigation

6.1. Power to investigate – (1) An officer incharge of a police station is empowered by section 156, Criminal Procedure Code, to investigate any cognizable offence which occur within the limits of his jurisdiction.
(2) He is also empowered under section 157 (1), Criminal Procedure Code, to depute a subordinate to proceed to the spot to investigate the facts and circumstances of the case and, if necessary, to take measures for the discovery and arrest of the offender, Any police officer may be so deputed under this section, but where a police officer below the rank of assistant sub-inspector is deputed the investigation shall invariably be taken up & completed by the officer incharge of the police station or an assistant sub-inspector at the first opportunity.
(3) An officer incharge of a station shall also render assistance whenever required to all officers of the Criminal Investigation Department working within his jurisdiction.
6.2. Powers of Investigating officer – (1) The powers and privileges of a police officer making an investigation are detailed in sections 160 to 175, Criminal Procedure Code.
An officer so making an investigation shall invariably issue an order in writing in Form 6.2 (1) to any person summoned to attend such investigation and shall endorse on the copy of the order retained by the person so summoned the date and time of his arrival at, and the date and time of his departure from the place to which he is summoned. The duplicate of the order shall be attached to the case diary.
(2) No-avoidable trouble shall be given to any person from whom enquiries are made and no person shall be unnecessarily detained.
(3) It is the duty of an investigation officer to find out the truth of the matter under investigation. His object shall be to discover the actual facts of the case and to arrest the real offender or offenders. He shall not commit himself prematurely to any view of the facts for or against any person.
6.3. Action when offence occurring in another police station is reported – When the occurrence of a cognizable offence in another police station jurisdiction is reported, the fact shall be recorded, in the daily diary and information shall be sent to the officer incharge of the police station in the jurisdiction of which the offence was committed. Mean while all possible lawful measures shall be taken to secure the arrest of the offender and the detection of the offence.
6.4. Where offence appears to have occurred in other police Station – (1) If a police officer after registering a case and commencing an investigation discovers that the offence was committed in the jurisdiction of another police station he shall at once send information to the officer incharge of such police station.
(2) Upon receipt of information such officer shall proceed without delay to the place where the investigation is being held and undertake the investigation.
6.5. Disputes as to jurisdiction – Should the officer who is thus summoned to the spot dispute the jurisdiction both officers shall jointly carry on the investigation under the orders of the senior officer and neither shall leave until the question of jurisdiction has been settled and acknowledged. The case record shall be kept at the police station where the information was first received until the question of jurisdiction has been decided.
6.6. Relieving and relieved officers to sign case diaries – when a police officer is relieved in the course of an investigation he shall record a report of all that he has done in a case diary and sign it, giving the date and hour of his relief. Such case diary shall be made over to the relieving officer who shall certify thereon that he acknowledges the case to have occurred within his station limits, or to be one which he is empowered to investigate, as the case may be.
6.7. Cancellation of a case in one Police Station and registration in another – When a case is transferred from one police station to another, the offence registered in the original police station shall be cancelled by the Superintendent and a first information report shall be submitted from the police station in the jurisdiction of which the case occurred.
6.8. Cases which may lawfully investigated in more local areas than one – (1) If the case is one which the officer incharge of the police station may lawfully investigate, but which may also be lawfully and more successfully investigated in another police station, such officer while continuing his investigation, shall refer the matter to the Superintendent who shall transfer the case or not as he sees fit.
(2) If it is desired to transfer the case to a police station in another district, tile Superintendent shall refer the matter to the Deputy Inspector General.
(3) When an investigation has been transferred from one district to another the police files with original first information report shall be forwarded to the Superintendent of the district to which the transfer is made
6.9. Optional investigation – (1) section 157 (h), Criminal Procedure, Code, gives wide powers to an officers incharge of a police station to refrain from investigation in unimportant cases. It is the duty, however, of every officer receiving a report to consider not only the intrinsic importance of the offence alleged and the expressed wishes of the complainant but the bearing which the report has or may have on the detection of other cases or on the prevention of crime and the control of criminals. Very many cases which appear trival in themselves, may, if investigated furnish a clue to the operations of professional criminals or afford valuable material at E later date for Preventive action. In practice it is seldom advisable for all officer incharge of a police station to avail himself of the power to refuse investigation, which the law gives him.
(2) When, at the time when a report of a cognizable offence is received, the investigating staff of the police station concerned is already occupies with more important cases, the investigation of which would suffer by being interrupted, such report shall be duly recorded and investigation may be dispensed with. Such action seal not be held to limit the discretion of the officer incharge of the police station to investigate the case at the later date, if he thinks it desirable to do so.
(3) If the information is present when the first information report is recorded, he shall be informed forthwith that no investigation will be made and, after nothing this fact in the first information report, his signature or thumb mark shall be taken on it. If the informant is not present, he shall be informed in writing by postcard, or by the delivery of a notice by hand, and the fact that this has been done shall be noted in the first information report,
(4) When investigation is dispensed with, a note shall be made in the first information report stating whether the complainant desires an investigation or not and full reasons shall be given for abstaining from investigation. All such cases shall be brought promptly to the notice of the Circle Officer, Who shall pass such orders on them as he may think fit in accordance with the principle embodied in this rule.
6.10. Immediate dispatch of an officer to the spot – when report of cognizable case is recorded and it is decided not to dispense with investigation under section 157 (b), Criminal Procedure Code, a police officer shall proceed to the scene immediately. the officer who first proceeds to the spot, shall, if he be not competent to complete the investigation, take all possible steps to preserve the scene of the crime from disturbance, to record particulars of and secure the presence of potential witnesses, obtain information relating to the case and arrest the culprit.
6.11. Investigation in non cognizable cases – (1) No police officer shall investigate a non-cognizable offence unless order to do so by a competent magistrate under section 196 B or 202, Criminal Procedure Code.
(2) When an investigation in a non-cognizable case is thus ordered and is taken up by the police under section 155 (3), Criminal Procedure Code, it must be carried through in the same manner as if the offence were cognizable, except that no arrest shall be made without a warrant. In every such case a police officer making an investigation shall day by day enter his proceedings in a case diary and submit them daily as prescribed for cognizable cases in police Rules 6.51 Case diaries shall be submitted through the Circle Officer concerned to the Court which has ordered investigation. No copies shall be prepared or kept by the police.
6.12. Orders in writing – All orders in writing made in case i.e. order to arrest, to search and to summon, etc. shall be attached to the case diaries, or their absence shall be satisfactorily accounted for.
6.13. Plan of scene – (1) In all important cases two plans of the scene of the offence shall be prepared by a qualified police officer or other suitable agency one to be submitted with the charge sheet or final report and the other to be retained for departmental use.
(2) The following rules shall govern the preparation of maps or plants by patwaries or other expert :-
(i) In ordinary cases no demands for such maps will be made upon patwaries.

(ii) In the case of heinous crime, especially in cases of murder or riots connected with land disputes, the police officer investigating the case will, if he considers an accurate map is required, summon to the scene of the crime the patwari of the circle in which it occurred and cause him to prepare two maps, one of production in court as evidence and the other for the use of the police investigating agency In the former reference relating to the facts observed by the police officer should be entered while in the latter references based on the statement of witnesses which are not relevant in evidence may be recorded. He will be careful not to detain the patwaries longer than is necessary for the preparation of the maps.

(iii) It is necessary to define clearly the responsibility of the patwari and police officer in respect of these maps.

(iv) The police officer will indicate to the patwari the limits of the land of which he desires maps, and the topographical items to be shown therein. The patwari will then be responsible for drawing the maps correctly. by tracing, if necessary, the second copy, for making accurately on maps all these items and for entering on the maps true distance. He will not write on the map, intended for production as evidence in the court any explanations. The police officer may write any explanations on the traced copy of the map.

(v) It is for the police officer himself to add to the second copy of the map such remarks as may be necessary to explain the connection of the map with the case under inquiry. He is also responsible equally with the patwaries for the correctness of all distances, but on the copy of the map drawn by the patwari for presentation in court he will make no remarks or explanations based on the statements of witnesses.

(vi) It will be convenient if all the entries made by the patwari are made in black ink, and those added by the police in red ink.

6.14. Technical Assistance in investigation – (1)Investigating officers are expected to take steps to secure expert technical assistance and advice, whenever such appears desirable in the course of investigation for purposes of evidence or for demonstration in court.
(2) The Criminal Investigation Department is able to obtain expert technical assistance on many subjects and should be freely consulted in that connection by investigating officers through their Superintendents of Police. When such assistance is required a full report shall be sent to the Superintendent of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, Crime Branch, so that he may be in a position to decide whether it is essential to send an expert to the scene of the crime or whether the material to be dealt with should be sent to the expert. In making such reports use should be made of telegraphic, telephonic and radio communication facilities.
(3) The Criminal Investigation Department, in conjunction with the finger Print Bureau, undertakes photographic and some other varieties of technical work related to scientific aids to investigation. In addition it is in contact with technical experts on many subjects, whose services can frequently be obtained for work in connection with criminal investigation. That Department is ‘also the channel for obtaining the service of the Inspector of explosives who, as well as advising on explosives generally, can given expert opinion as to whether a weapon has been recently fired, whether certain matter is gunpowder or not, and all questions generally savouring of chemical analysis.
6.15. Examination of handwriting, arms & ammunition, etc – The above rules do not apply to references to the Finger Print Bureau and the Chemical Examiner to the Rajasthan Government or to the State Examiner of questioned documents, to whom, under the rules applicable. Superintendents of Police are required to make references direct. The Criminal Investigation Department is, however, in direct contact with all these technical officers and investigating officers should enlist its co-operation when any specially intricate work is required of them,
(2) Nothing in the preceding sub-rule shall debar a Superintendent of police or Investigating Officer from availing himself of any expert technical assistance, which may be directly available to him for the purpose of investigation If expert evidence is to be given in court, however, it should be provided by Government experts only when such experts exist.
(3) In connection with the examination of arms and ammunition, argenal official should only be required to report, and if absolutely essential, give, evidence (i) on technical factory points, e.g., whether a weapon is in serviceable condition; whether a particular part of a weapon is factory or mistri made, and the like;(ii) on the type of ammunition intended to be used (not can be used) as experience shows that there is practically no limit in this respect in a particular weapon, and (iii) whether a cartridge has been reloaded, nature of load, and the like Argenal shall not be used for elaborate and definite sworn testimony as to whether a particular missile was or not fired from a particular weapon. Should districts desire, for opinion of this nature they may apply to the Criminal Investigation Department for assistance but such reference should be confined to cases of major importance only.
6.16. Cases against Government servants. – (1) When a Government servant is accused or is suspected of the commission of an offence in the course of his official duties his immediate departmental superior, shall,as far as may be wise and practicable, be kept informed regarding the course of the police investigation.
6.17. Supervision by Circle Officers. – (1) In all important cases Circle officers are required personally to supervise the investigation so far as is possible and when necessary to visit the scene of the offence.
(2) Every Circle Officer shall maintain a running note-book of offence Crime Digest) in which he shall enter the salient points of the first information report and case diaries. The following are some of the points that should be entered in this note-books:-
First Information report – (a) Police Station, village section, date time of offence.
(b) Distance of village from police station and date and time of investigation opening.

(c) Name and rank of investigating officer, who should always be the senior officer available Reasons for junior officer taking up cases should be most carefully checked, and

(d) Salient features of the case.

Case Diaries – (a) Dates of the case diaries.
(b) By whom written and where, and

(c) Salient features.

All unnecessary delays in the course of investigations in challenging successful cases or in submitting final reports in untraced cases should be carefully observed and stopped. Deputy Inspectors General and District Superintendent of Police shall call for these note books at their inspections and insist on their being intelligently used for the purpose of efficient supervision of investigations.
(3) Circle Officer shall interest themselves in the challans of cases in their charge as they come in and discuss them with the prosecuting inspector, and if possible with the officers who investigated them; and shall keep in touch with the proceedings in court.
(4) Every Circle Officer should bring to the notice of the District Magistrate through the proper channel. and unnecessary delays that occur in dealing with cases in courts, instances in which witnesses come up with challans and are sent back unheard and delays in framing charges, hearing arguments or pronouncing judgments.
(5) Circle officers should follow closely the progress of cases in their charge through the courts and they should ascertain, as soon as possible, the grounds for all discharges and acquittals if the grounds for discharges or acquittals appear to be unreasonable, they should at once bring the cases prominently to the notice of the District Magistrate through the Superintendent of Police.
6.18. Statement recorded under section 161, Code of Criminal Procedure. – Statement recorded by an investigating officer under section 161, Code of Criminal Procedure shall not form part of the case diary prescribed by section 172 but shall be recorded separately and attached to the case diary, the necessary number of copies being made by the carbon copying process on case diary continuation sheets (Form 6.52).
The number of statements attached to a particular case diary, and the number of pages in each statement, shall be noted in the case diary. An investigating officer after examining a person orally or recording a statement under section 161, Code of Criminal Procedure, shall make a brief note of the fact in his case diary:-
6.19. Communications of official documents of information. – It is a universally recognized and fundamental principle of police procedure that the identity of sources and agents from whom secret information is obtained shall be known only to the officer who employs them and that every precaution shall be taken to protect them from exposure. Except by direction of the Governor, a Police officer shall on no account disclose the identity of a source or agent to any officer or person outside the Force, Within the Force he shall disclose it only to or as ordered by the superior officer mentioned below, In the Criminal Investigation Department this superior officer is Deputy Inspector General in case of the whole department and the Superintendent of Police, Special Branch and Superintendent of Police Criminal Investigation Department, Crime Branch as regards the Special and Crime Branches, respectively. In a district it is the Superintendent of Police or the Circle officer immediately under whom the police officer employing an agent or a source is working. When information obtained from an agent has to be transmitted to others, the greatest care shall be exercised to avoid the exposure of such agent. The original report, or an extract copy of the original report shall not be transmitted but the substance or a paraphrase shall be sent.
(2) All sources of Police information are protected in judicial trials by sections 124 and 125 of the Indian Evidence Act which provide respectively that no public officer should be compelled to disclose communications made to him in official confidence and that no Magistrate or police officer shall compelled to say whence he obtained any information as to the commission of any offence. Instructions regarding the production of police records as evidence are contained in rule 8.18.

6.20. Medico Legal Opinion. – Persons requiring examination at the headquarters of district shall be taken to the Civil Hospital and not to a branch dispensary. Similarly in rural areas, where a hospital is accessible, medico-legal cases shall be sent there and not to a rural dispensary.
(2) Medical officers may not be called upon to proceed to the scene of an occurrence to examine injured persons except in cases of real urgency and when it is impossible to convey the injured person to the nearest dispensary or hospital.
(3) All medical officers incharge of hospitals and dispensaries are required to report to the nearest police station within 24 hours, all cases of serious injury or of poisoning admitted by them for treatment, whether such cases have been brought in by the police or not.
(4) Police officers should refrain from sending person whose injuries are obviously slight for medico-legal examination, and should exercise their discretion in obtaining a medical opinion as to whether injuries received by complainants constitute a cognizable offence.
(5) Medico-legal cases not requiring urgent attention should be sent for examination during Hospital hours only.
Note :- This rule does not entitle the medical officer concerned to refuse to examine a case out of hours because in his opinion it is not an urgent one.

(6) The unnecessary summoning as witnesses of medical subordinates, to the detriment of their proper activities, shall be avoided as far as possible, and, when the attendance of such an officer is necessary, as much notice as possible shall be given to him. When the necessary evidence can be given by the investigating officer or by another medical witness stationed at the place where the case is being prosecuted a medical subordinate should not be summoned from a distance merely to give corroborative evidence.
6.21. Wounded complainants and witnesses. – (1) When a complainant or a witness of importance in an important case in seriously ill or is wounded, but does not appear to be dying the police officer making the investigation shall prepare a charge sheet in accordance with rule 6.54 if this has not already been done and shall either :-
(a) with such persons consent, send him or her, for medical treatment to the station of the magistrate having jurisdiction and invite such magistrate to take such persons deposition in the presence of the accused person, or

(b) if such complainant or witness cannot be moved, or refuses to be sent, such officer shall apply for an order of detention in respect of the accused person if he is in custody and such order is necessary and invite the magistrate having jurisdiction to record the deposition of such complainant or witness in the presence of the accused person at the place where the former is lying.

6.22. Dying declarations. – (1) A dying declaration shall, whenever possible, be recorded by a Magistrate.
(2) The person making the declaration shall, if possible, be examined by a medical officer with a view to ascertaining that he is sufficiently in possession of his reason to make a lucid statement.
(3) If no magistrate can be obtained, the declaration shall,when a gazetted police officer is not present, be recorded, it shall be recorded in the presence of two or more reliable witnesses unconnected with the police department and with the parties concerned in the case.
(4) If no such witnesses can be obtained without risk of the injured person dying before his statement can be recorded, it shall be recorded in the presence of two or more police officers.
(5) A dying declaration made to a police officer should, under section 162, Code of Criminal Procedure, be signed by the person making it,

6.23. Medical examination of women. – No examination by a male medical officer of a living woman’s person shall be made without a written order from a magistrate, addressed to the Medical Officer, directing him to take such examination.
In all cases in which the police consider such an examination to be necessary, the women shall be taken before a magistrate for orders.
The word ‘person’ applies only to those par,ts of the body, to expose which would violate a woman’s modesty.
Female Assistant or Sub-Assistant Surgeons in Government service shall only be required to do medico-legal work on behalf of Government when the woman or girl concerned refuses to be examined by a male doctor. When a female doctor is summoned by a court she must attend.
6.24. Searches by police officers. – (1) The rules regarding searches by police officers are contained in sections 165 and 166, Code of Criminal Procedure Notices of search under section 165, Criminal Procedure code summons to persons to witness search under section 103(1), Criminal Procedure Code, and search lists under section 103(2), Criminal Procedure Code, shall be prepared in Forms 6.24 (1) (a), (b) and (c) respectively.
(2) An officer incharge of a police station receiving a requisition to search, under section 166, Code of Criminal Procedure, or other law applicable shall comply without unnecessary delay and shall take all necessary precautions to ensure a successful search.
A police officer making such requisition may attend personally and assist in such search or may send one or more of his subordinate for that purpose.
(3) Circle officers supervising investigation and inspecting officers shall take disciplinary action against investigating officer who carry out searches under section 165, code of Criminal Procedure, without sufficient justification.
6.25. Records in custody of the Post Office. – The law regarding the production of documents or things in the custody of the Postal Telegraph Department is contained in section 95, code. of Criminal Procedure,
The instructions issued by the Director-General of Post Officers (Paragraph 152 of volume V of the Post and Telegraphs Manually regarding Production of records in the custody of the post office are as follows.-
(1) Records of a post office or mail office should be produced and information available in them should ‘be given, on the written order of any police officer who is making an ‘investigation in a congnizable case under the Criminal Procedure Code, or of any Excise office empowered by a Local Government or Administration to investigate offences punishable under any Excise Act, but only those entries in the records should be disclosed which relate no the person or persons charged with the offence under investigation or which are relevant to that offence. In any other case, the official in-charge of the office should, without delay, refer for orders to the Head of the Circle, who will decide whether or not, under section 124 of the Indian Evidence Act, (1 of 1872) the information asked for should be withheld-
Note 1. This rule does not authorise the Post office to hand over the records to Police Officer unless an order under section 95 of Criminal Procedure Code is obtained by the Police Officer from the District Magistrate, High Court or Court of Session.

(2) When the information asked for by a police or Excise Officer is not available in the records of the office concerned, the police or the Excise Officer should be informed accordingly. irrespective the question whether the information if available, might or might not be given.
Exception – This rule does not apply to the production of telegraph message drafts which should only be produced under the rules on the subject in the Posts and Telegraphs Manual, Volume XI.
6.26. Importance of footprints and track evidence – (1) Footprints are of the first importance in the investigation of crime. For this reason all officers incharge of Police Stations shall instruct their subordinates as well as all chaukidars that, when any crime occurs all footprints and other marks existing on the scene of the crime should be carefully preserved and a watch set to see that as few persons as possible are permitted to visit the scene of the crime.
(2) When it is desired to produce evidence of the identity of tracks found at the scene of or in connection with a crime, the procedure for securing the record of such evidence shall be similar to that prescribed in rule 7.31 for identification of suspects. The attendance of a magistrate of the highest available status shall be secured or, if that is impossible, independent witnesses of reliable character shall be summoned. In the presence of the magistrate of other witnesses, and in conformity with any reasonable directions of reliable character shall be summoned. In the presence of the magistrate or other witnesses, and in conformity with any reasonable directions which they may give, ground shall be prepared for the tests. On this grounds the suspect or suspects, and not less than five other persons shall be required to walk. The magistrate, or in his absence the police officer conducting the tests shall record the names of all these persons and the order in which they enter the test ground, While these preparations are proceeding the tricker or other witness-who is to be asked to identify the tracks shall be prevented from approaching the place or seeing any of the persons be called up and required to examine both the original tracks and those on the test ground, and thereafter to make this statement. The magistrate, or in his absence, the Police Officer conducting the test shall record the statement of the witness as to the grounds of his claim to identify the tracks, and shall put such other questions as he may deem proper to test his bonafides. The officer investigating the case and his assistant shall be allowed no share in the conduct of the test.
Tracks found which it is desired to test by comparison as above, shall be protected immediately on discovery, and their nature, measurements and peculiarities shall be recorded at the time in the case diary of the investigating officer.
The details of the preparation of the test ground and the actions required of the suspect and those with whom his tracks are mixed must vary according to the circumstances of the case. The officer conducting the test in consultation with the magistrate or independent witnesses, shall so arrange that the identifying witness may be given a fair chance but under the strictest safeguards of comparing with the original tracks, other tracks made on similar ground and in similar conditions.
(3) The evidence of a tracker or other expert described in the foregoing rule can be substantiated by the preparation of moulds of other footprints of criminal or criminals found at the scene of the crime. In making moulds for production as evidence the following precautions should be observed-
(a) The footprints found on scene of the crime must be pointed out to the reliable witnesses at the time and these same witnesses must be present during the preparation of the moulds.

(b) The latter must also be signed or marked by the witnesses and the officer preparing them while still setting.

(c) After the procedure described in sub-rule (2) above has been completed a mould should be prepared in the presence of the magistrate or witnesses of one of the foot prints of the suspect made in their presence. This mould should be signed by the magistrate or witnesses when still setting.

(d) Both moulds should be carefully preserved for production in court for identification by witnesses and comparison by the Court.

6.27. Statement recorded by magistrates – (1) The circumstances under which police officers may require a statement to be recorded by a magistrate are as follows :
(a) The statement, made in the course of an investigation by a witness or an accused person, and not amounting to a confession, may be recorded by a magistrate under section 164, Code of Criminal Procedure, in order that it may be available as evidence at a later stage. Such statements may be recorded in any of the manners prescribed for recording evidence.

(b) A confession may be recorded under section 164, Criminal Procedure Code, irrespective of the tender of a pardon, and of whether it involves more persons than the individual accused making it.

(c) In the classes of offences specified in section 337, Criminal Procedure Code, a police officer may, at any state of the investigation, inquiry or trial, move a magistrate empowered under that section to tender a pardon to an accused person.

(2) If a professional offender is convicted and sentenced to imprisonment or transportation and it appears that he belongs to a gang of offenders and is willing to do everything in his power to bring the members of such gang to justice, or to give valuable information leading to the discovery of stolen property, the Superintendent may apply to the State Government for suspension or remission of the sentence of such prisoner under section 401, Criminal Procedure Code, Such application shall be made through the District Magistrate.
6.28. Confessing accused and approvers – (1) The Criminal Procedure Code prescribes a number of precautions which are intended to give to a court conducting a trial the maximum assurance that a confessing accused has not been subjected to such pressure or inducements as to invalidate this evidence under section 24, Indian Evidence Act. All police officers, who exercise any authority in connection with investigations are required to have & thorough understanding of these provisions. The departmental instructions here given merely supplement and in no sense replace them.
(2) The main requirements, in so far as the Police are concerned, are:-
(a) No police officer may offer a pardon. An accused person desirous of making a statement with a view to obtaining a pardon, shall be told that no promise whatsoever can be made, but that, if a statement is made and verified and found to be of sufficient importance to merit such action, the facts will be reported to a magistrate, who has power to offer a pardon. No steps may be taken in this connection by subordinate police officers without the previous sanction in writing of a gazetted police officer.

(b) Statements, whether under section 164 or 337, Criminal Procedure Code, shall be recorded by the magistrate, other than the District Magistrate, having the highest powers, who can be reached within a reasonable time. Save for special reasons, which must be explained by the investigating officer, such statement shall never be recorded by 2nd class magistrates unless they have been specially empowered to record such statements.

(c) The magistrate is required to make enquiries as to the circumstances leading up to the confession, and police officer shall invariably furnish, so far as is in their power, information required of them in this respect.

(d) Police officers connected with the investigation shall not be present while the confession is being recorded.

(e) Magistrates are required to give orders when remanding to custody persons who have made a confession, that they shall be kept separate from other prisoners.

(f) When more than one person confesses or turns approver in a case, their confession shall, if possible, be recorded by different magistrates and she shall not be allowed to meet one another till their evidence has been recorded in court.

(g) Magistrates shall be moved to record statements of confessing persons in full details; in political cases and those in which professional criminals whose activities extend over a large fields are suspected, copies of approvers’ statements and confessions shall be sent to the Deputy Inspector General Criminal Investigation Department.

(3) It must be remembered that the prosecution of a gang case, even without an approver, in a section 30 magistrate’s court, is a very lengthy and difficult task owing to the large number of witnesses and the numerous linked Individual cases. If, however, the prosecution relies upon an approver, the length and difficulty of the task is at least doubled as, in accordance with section 337 (2A), Code of Criminal Procedure, the case has to be committed to the Sessions or High Court. Therefor, before launching gang case under section 400 or 401, Indian Penal code, with an approver,the District Magistrate and Superintendent of Police should first satisfy themselves that it is not possible to secure satisfactory results by proceeding in individual cases without resort to section 400and 401, Indian Penal Code. If, however, it should still appear expedient to conduct a gang case, they should ascertain whether the district resources are equal to the strain of both committal proceedings and trial in the Sessions or High Court without out side assistance. If the district resources appear to be inadequate, the case should then be referred through the Deputy Inspector General of the range to the Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, for decision whether the case should or should not be under taken.

6.29. Place of trial – With regard to the place of trial of cases falling under sections 179, 143, Code of Criminal Procedure, police officer shall act solely with reference to the public convenience.
Ordinarily such cases shall be sent up for trial in the district in which the witnesses can attend with the least inconvenience to themselves.
6.30. Inquests – (1) An officer incharge of a Police station shall, upon receipt of information of the sudden or unnatural death of any person, when the body of such person within the local jurisdiction of his police station, immediately send information to the nearest magistrate authorised to hold inquests and shall proceed to the place where the body is and hold an investigation in the manner prescribed by section 174, Code of Criminal Procedure. When the Sub-Inspector incharge of the Police Station through illness or absence from the station house, is himself unable to carry out the investigation, he shall at the first convenient opportunity proceed to the place where the body of the deceased person was found, and shall personally verify the results of the investigation.
(2) In cases where the body is not found, or has been buried, there can be no investigation under section 174, Code of Criminal procedure.
In such cases, if there are reasonable grounds for suspicion that a congnizable offence has been committed, the police shall register a case and commence investigation :
Provided that the following cases shall be exceptions to this rule :
(a) In the case of a death by violence occurring within the wall of a military prison or civil jail the police shall not make an investigation into the cause of death when an inquest has been held by a competent magistrate.

(b) Upon receipt of information of a sudden or unnatural death within the walls of a prison the officer incharge of the police station concerned shall send immediate intimation to the senior magistrate present at headquarters and shall proceed to the prison and place a guard over the body and shall allow neither the body nor anything which may have caused the death of the deceased to be moved until the arrival of a magistrate.

6.31. Investigation under section 174, code of Criminal Procedure – The respectable inhabitants who are required by section 174, Code of Criminal Procedure to take part in any investigation into a sudden or unnatural death shall be selected with reference to any special attainments they may possess which are likely to be of use in such investigation.
6.32. Investigating officer action of at scene of death – On arrival at the place where the body of a deceased person is lying, the police officer making the investigation shall act as follows :-
(1) He shall prevent the destruction of evidence as to the cause of death.
(2) He shall prevent crowding round the body and the obliteration of footsteps and finger prints etc.
(3) He shall prevent unnecessary access to the body until the investigation is concluded.
(4) He shall cover up footprints with suitable vessels so long as may be necessary.
(5) He shall draw a correct plan of the scene of death including all features necessary to a right understanding of the case.
(6) If no surgeon or other officer arrives, he shall, together with the other persons conducting the investigation, carefully examine the body and note all abnormal appearance.
(7) He shall remove, mark with a seal, and seal up all clothing not adhering to or required as a covering for the body, all ornament and anything which may have caused or been concerned in the death of and shall make an inventory thereof.
In the inventory shall be described the position in which each thing was found and any blood stain, mark, rent, injury or other noticeable face in connection with such thing. The number and dimension of such stains marks, rents, injuries, etc., shall also be given in the inventory.
A counterpart of the mark and seal attached to such thing or to the parcel in which it has been enclosed shall be entered in, or attached to, the inventory.
Such inventory shall form part of inquest report.
(8) He shall take the finger prints of the deceased person if the body is unidentified.
(9) The photographing of the body in situ and of the scene of the occurrence may prove of great evidential value.

6.33. Disinterment of bodies – The following rules relate to disinterment of bodies.
(1) An officer incharge of a police station and any superior police officer lawfully making an investigation into the unnatural or sudden death of any person shall, on learning that the body of the deceased person has been formally buried, record in writing the information which has reached him and the grounds on which he considers it necessary that the body should be disinterred.
(2) He shall forward the information so recorded to the nearest magistrate empowered to hold inquests and ask for an order under section 176 (2), of Criminal Procedure and in the meantime shall guard the grave.
(3) On receipt of such order, if the magistrate himself does not attend the disinterment, such police officer shall in the presence of two or more respectable inhabitants of the neighbourhood, cause the body to be disinterred. Such police officer shall then comply with the provisions of section 174, Code of Criminal Procedure.
(4) Police officers shall invariably examine witnesses to prove the identity of disinterred bodies before commencing their investigation.
(5) When a body has laid in the grave for a period exceeding three weeks no disinterment shall be made by any police officer until the opinion of the Civil Surgeon has been obtained, and then only with concurrence of the District magistrate.
6.34. The Inquest Report – (1) When the investigation has been completed the investigating officer shall draw up a report, in duplicate by the e2 soon copying process, in Forms 6.34 (1), (A), (B) or (C) according as ti’ to deceased appears to have died:-
A. Form natural causes, B. By violence, C. By poisoning.
(2) Such report shall state the apparent cause of death, give a description of any mark or marks of violence which may be found on the body and describe the manner in which and the weapon or instrument with which such marks appear to have been inflicted.
(3) The report shall be signed by the police officer conducting the investigation and by so many of the persons assisting in the investigation as occur therein and shall be forwarded without delay through the Circle Officer to the Ilaqa Magistrate.
(4) The following, documents shall form part of such report :
(a) The plan of the scene of death.

(b) The inventory of clothing, etc.

(c) A list of the articles on and with the body, if the body is sent for medical examination.

(d) A list of articles sent for medical examination, if any.

(5) In cases of death by hanging, the report shall give particulars as to the height and sufficiency of the support and the nature of the thing used to bear the weight of the body.
In drowning cases the depth of the water shall be stated.
(6) The carbon copy of such report shall be filed in the police station register No. 6 (Rule 3.46).
(7) A copy of all reports relating to death caused by railway accidents shall, when made by a police officer other than a railway police officer be forwarded to the Superintendent of Police, Government Railway Police.
6.35. Post-mortem examination – When and by whom held – (1) The legal requirements in respect of post-mortem examination by a qualified surgeon are contained in section 174 (3), code of Criminal Procedure. In every case where death appears to have been due to suicidal homicidal accidental or suspicious causes, and where any doubt exists as to the exact cause of death or if it appears to the officer conducting the investigation– whether under section 157 or section 174, Code of Criminal Procedure- expedient to do so; the body shall be sent to the nearest medical officer authorised by the Government to conduct post-mortem examinations. The sending of bodies for examination may only be dispensed with, where such action is otherwise required when condition exist, such as advanced putrefaction, which would clearly make examination useless.
(2) The law requires that the dead body shall be sent to the nearest qualified medical officer. The summoning of such officers to conduct examination at or near the scene of the death shall not be resorted to save in exceptional case These may occur, where, owing to advanced putrefaction or the circumstances in which the corpse was found, movement of the corpse may make it impossible for the medical officer to form a correct opinion as to the nature of injuries or the exact cause of death. In such cases if the investigating officer considers expert post-mortem examination essential in the interests of justice he shall request the qualified medical officer to proceed to the spot for examination.
(3) In cases where it is impossible either to send a body to a qualified medical officer, or to have it examined by such officer on the spot, the investigating officer may, at his discretion, request the nearest Government medical officer, even though such office be not authorised to conduct post-mortem examination, to assist him with his with his anatomical and other expert knowledge in estimating the effects and causes of injuries, etc. Such medical officers are not empowered to perform any operation on the body.
[Provided that in case of road and rail accident of investigation officer has no doubt about the cause of the death it shall not be necessary for him to send dead body, for postmortem].

6.36. Post-mortem examinations. – Action to be taken by police- When corpses are sent for medical examination the following rules shall be observed:-
(1) The result of the investigating officers examination of the body shall be carefully recorded in Form 6.36 (1) Clothing found on the body, foreign matter adhering to it and any instrument likely to have caused death remaining in a wound or on the body shall be secured to the position in which found if possible, or otherwise, shall be carefully packed separately, according to the instructions contained in rule 6.39.
(2) To contract decomposition as far as possible the body shall be sprinkled with formal indiluted to 10 per cent and shall also be sensed with strong solution of chloride of lime in water. Besides which have to be carried long distances should be sprinkled with the day powder of chloride of lime or with carbolic powder sold commercially in tin boxes with a perforated lid specially constructed for sprinkling purposes. The use of powdered charcoal is prohibited, as the stains caused thereby may complicate the task of post-mortem examination.
(3) The body shall be placed on a charpoy or other light litter and protected from the sun, flies and exposure to the weather. The litter shall be transported to the place appointed for the holding of post-mortem examinations by such means as the investigating officer may consider most expedient in the circumstances of weather, distance to be covered and conditions of the body. If necessary and expedient conveyance including a motor vehicle, may be hired to carry the corpse and those who are required to accompany it as escort or witnesses.
(4) All Police Officers along the route are required to give immediate assistance to expedite the transportation of dead bodies for Medical examination.
(5) Two police officers who have seen the dead body in the position in which it was first found, and are competent to detect any attempt at substitution or tempering with the body or its coverings shall accompany the body to the mortuary, and remain incharge of it until examination is complete. If necessary an additional guard shall be supplied to place a sentry on the mortuary, but the officers who have accompanied the body from the spot shall hand it over personally to the medical officer conducting the postmortem examination together with all reports and articles sent by the investigating officer to assist the examination and shall receive and convey to the investigating officer the postmortem report.
(6) As soon as the medical officer has intimated that his examination is complete, the police shall, unless they have received orders from a competent authority to the contrary, make over the body to the deceased’s relatives or friends, or, if there are no relatives or friends, or they decline to receive it, the police shall cause the body to be buried or burnt according to the rules.
6.37. Unidentified bodies. – If a body is unidentified, the officer making investigation shall record a careful description of it, giving all marks, peculiarities, deformities and distinctive features, shall take the finger impressions and, in addition to taking all other reasonable steps to secure identification shall; if possible, have it photographed and, in cases where such action appears desirable, a description published in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette.
Unidentified corpses should be handed over to any charitable society which is wiling to accept them, and if no such society comes forward they should then be buried or burnt.
6.38. Form to accompany body of injured person – As injured person or a body is sent to a medical officer; Form 6.36 (1) shall, in addition to any other report prescribed, be prepared by the carbon copying process and given to police officer, in duplicate, who accompanies the injured person or goes in charge of the body.
6.39. Articles for medical examination how sent – (1) Articles sent for medical examination together with a body or injured person, shall be sent under the charge of the escort which accompanies such body or persons.
(2) When no body of injured person is sent, such articles shall be sent in the charge of an escort which shall take them to the Principal Medical Officer without relief.
6.40. Chemical Examiner- Channel of communication with – (1) Superintendents of Police are authorised to correspond with, and submit articles for analysis to, the Chemical Examiner direct in all cases other than human poisoning cases. Any references in references in relation to human poisoning cases shall be made through the Principal Medical Officer.
(2) Articles for chemical examination – (2) With regard to the packing of articles sent for chemical examination the following rules shall be observed :-
(i) Liquids, vomit excrement and the like, shall be placed in clean wide mouthed bottles or glazed jars, the stoppers or corks of which shall be tied down with bladder, leather or cloth, the knots of the cord being sealed with the seal of the police officer making the investigation.

Such bottles or jars shall be tested, by reversing them for a few a minutes, to see whether they leak or not.
(ii) Supposed medicines or poisons, being dry substances, shall be similarly tied down in jars or made up into sealed parcels.

(iii) All exhibits suspected to contain stains should be thoroughly dry before being packed and dispatched for examinations. In cases of exhibits that become : brittle on drying, they should be carefully packed in cotton wool and then in a wooden box.

(iv) Blood stained weapons, articles or cloth, shall be marked with a seal and made up into sealed parcels. The entire article shall be sent.

(v) Sharp edged and pointed exhibits like swords, spears etc. should be packed in boxes and not bound up into cloth packages. In their transit through the post they are liable to cut through the packing material and the exhibit is exposed.

(vi) On each bottle, jar and parcel, and also on each article or set of articles contained therein, the separate identification of which has to be proved, shall be affixed a label describing the contents, giving full particulars and stating where each article was found.

On such label shall be impressed a counterpart of the seal used to secure the fastening of the bottle, jar or parcel. A copy of each label, and a counter-part impression of the seal, shall be given in the inquest report, and in the case of cattle poisoning, in the case diary.
(vii) As far as possible no letters should be glued on to exhibits as they interfere with analysis.

(viii) Exhibits such as clods of earth should be packed carefully in wool and placed in a wooden box.

(3) Any document purporting to be report from the Chemical Examiner or his assistants is admissible as evidence under section 510, code of Criminal Procedure.
(5) Attention is also directed to the further directions for, and precaution to be taken in forwarding articles to the Chemical Examiner for examination report and the rules for preserving and packing exhibits container in Appendix 640 (4).

6.41. Explosive. – (1) Substances or objects suspected of being explosive shall be s sent for examination to the Inspector of Explosives.
(2) Instruction or dealing with substances or objects suspected of being explosive are published in Appendix 6.14(2).
6.42. Procedure in poisoning cases – (1) A police officer making an investigation in a case in which poison has been administered shall record in his report all information likely to be of value in assisting the Principal in his report all information likely to be of value in assisting the Principal Medical Officer or the Chemical Examiner to form an opinion as to the precise poison employed
(2) When treatment has been adopted before the death of the individual, the duration and nature of such treatment shall be communicated to the Principal Medical Officer for the information of the Chemical Examiner
(3) If the body of the deceased person has been burnt, the ashes of the funeral pyre shall be collected and sent in a closed vessel to the Principal Medical Officer, accompanied by a statement of the circumstances which rendered this course of action advisable.
6.43. Procedure in case of poisoning of animals – When, in the investigation of cognizable offence relating to the unlawful killing of an animal, it is necessary to obtain a professional opinion as to the cause of the death of such animals : –
(i) If the animals appear to have been poisoned in the ordinary way & there are no signs of puncture on the carcase the mouth shall be examined and anything abnormal found in it secured and placed in a clean glazed jar or bottle.

(ii) The carcase shall be opened and the stomach removed.

The stomach shall be cut open, and its appearance observed, as to whether it is congested or not.
A piece of the stomach, the ,most congested part, about a pound in weight, the reticulum, and a portion of the liver, about a pound in weight, shall be cut off and placed in a clean glazed jar bottle.
Rectified spirit shall be poured into the bottle in sufficient quantity to cover the contents completely in whatever position the vessel may be held.
The quantity of spirits shall be at least one third of the bulk of the object in the bottle.
(iii) Water shall be gently poured over the remaining portion of the stomach and any arsenic or any white or yellow particles found shall be carefully collected.

The poison particles, or pebbles, so collected or otherwise found, shall be enclosed in a sealed parcel.
(iv) If the animal appears to have been poisoned by means of needles, the cercase shall be flayed and the flesh near the puncture examined.

It the flesh appears inflamed, a portion near the puncture shall be cut off and secured in the manner prescribed in sub-section (2).
Any needle found shall likewise be secured.
(v) If the animal has been poisoned by being caused to inhale fumes of arsenic, etc., a portion of the lining membrane of the nostrils and windpipe and in addition, the animal’s lungs shall be secured.

(vi) Jars or bottles shall be carefully corked or stoppered and the corked or stoppers tied down with bladder, leather, or cloth.

The knots of the cords shall be sealed with the seal of the police officer making the investigation.
Jars and bottles shall be tested, by reversing them for a few minutes, to see whether they leak or not.
(vii) On each bottle, jar or parcel shall be affixed label describing the contents and giving full particulars and on such label shall be impressed a counterpart of the seal used to secure the fastening of the bottle, jar or parcel. A copy of each label and a counterpart impression of the seal shall be given in the case diary accompanying the dispatch.

(viii) The jars, bottles and parcels and any stupposed poison found shall be dispatched to the Superintendent of Police for transmission to the Chemical Examiner with the information required by Form 6.43. (iii)

6.44. Matter how forwarded to Chemical Examiner – (1) If the Superintendent of Police considers that there are prima facie grounds for believing that the animal, was poisoned, the bottles, jars or parcels shall be enclosed in a soldered tin case with an outer wooden cover and dispatched, carriage paid, to the Chemical Examiner. If the box is to be sent by post, or as prepaid freight by rail, the additional precautions described in Appendix 6.40 (4) shall be taken. A label bearings reference to the number and date of the letter intimating despatch shall be placed inside the box. Such letter shall contain an inventory of the jars, bottles, and parcels dispatched with counterparts of their labels and seals. A thin layer of cotton wood shall be placed on each side of the seal impression to prevent its being broken in the post.
(2) An English translation of the material parts of the case diary relating to the poisoning of the animals shall be forwarded with the letter intimating the dispatch of the box.
(3) The owner of the carcase of a poisoned animal shall be encouraged to destroy it by cutting up the hide in small piece, breaking up the horns and bones and by tying the whole at a considerable depth Cattle are sometimes poisoned by hide dealers with a view to obtaining their hides at a cheap rate. The destruction of the hide removes this motive.
(4) Bills for all costs incurred in the transmission of substances for medical examination whether connected with the death of human beings or of animals shall be paid from the budget head ‘Transport charges of dead bodies and wounded and accused persons under 29-police (4) other charges.’
6.45. Imporial Serologist, Calcutta-articles sent to – The Following rules reg-lite the circumstances under which articles suspected to bear human blood-stains shall be sent to the Imperial Serologist, Calcutta through the Chemical Examiner:-
(a) In case which the evidence of the blood-stained articles is relatively to the whole body of the evidence, of small importance, the articles shall be sent direct to the Chemical Examiner, Jaipur, for examination.

(b) In case in which the establishment of the fact that blood stains are of human blood, as distinct from the general classification of ‘Mammalian’ is material to the prosecution and has a really important bearing on the case, the blood-stained articles shall be sent direct to the Chemical Examiner, who will determine which of such articles he will forward to the Imperior Serologist with the necessary sketches, etc. In sending articles for the serologist test, the Superintendent of Police shall specifically ask for examination to determine the source of the blood. The Imperial Serologist Will after examining the articles sent to him by the Chemical Examiner, return them with a copy of report direct to the Superintendent of Police concerned.

(c) When blood stained clothing is concerned, the stained portion only shall be cut out by the Chemical Examiner and sent. In the case of weapons and other solid articles the entire articles may have to be sent.

(d) All articles shall be accompanied by a complete medico-legal history of the case.

(e) No article shall be sent direct to the Chemical Examiner except under the express orders of the Superintendent.

6.46. Report of Medical Officer – (1) The medical officer having completed his examination of the person, body or article shall ,record in full the result arrived at, and in the case of a post-mortem examination, his opinion as to the cause of death. He shall also record a list of any articles which he may intend to the Chemical Examiner. The report shall be written on the back of or attached to, Form 6.36 (1) and shall contain such reference to the person or object examined as will leave no possible doubt as to which case the remarks apply. (2) The report shall be placed with the police file of the case and may be used by the medical officer to refresh his memory when giving evidence.
6.47. Maintenance and disposal of stolen cattle during investigation and trial – (1) In cases in which cattle or otherwise animals alleged to be stolen are exhibits, the investigating officer shall, if the court of the magistrate having jurisdictions so distant from the place where the cattle or other animals are kept that evidence of identification is likely to be prejudiced or the cattle are likely to suffer in condition by being driven to and from, send information to the prosecuting branch that the case is ready for trial, and request that it may be heard at or near the place where the cattle have been seized or found. On receipt of such report the head of the prosecuting branch shall, subject to the orders of the Superintendent of Police, represent the fact to the District Magistrate and move him to arrange for case to be tried on the spot.
(2) When a challan is actually laid before a magistrate the stolen cattle should properly be in the custody of the police, but as soon as the identification evidence has been completed, the police prosecuting agency should at once approach the magistrate under section 546-A of the Criminal Procedure Code, with a request that the cattle may be made over to an independent surety or to the complainant on security pending the conclusion of the case.
(3) With the object of mitigating the injury and inconvenience caused to owners of stolen cattle during the investigation and trial of cattle theft cases, the prosecuting branch shall move courts trying such cases to award punishment of fine as well as imprisonment and direct such fine to be paid to the owner of the cattle concerned in the case in proportion to the loss or injury he may have suffered by reason of his association with the investigation and trial,as provided by section 545 (1)(b)(c) of the code of Criminal Procedure.
(4) In cattle theft .cases sureties to whom cattle have been made over for custody and production as and when required during the investigation and trial are entitled to receive the cost of maintaining such cattle, Expenses incurred under this rule during the investigation of a case shall be paid from the allotment at the disposal of Superintendent of Police under the appropriate head. Payment may be made direct to the person entitled to receive it from the Permanent at the disposal of Superintendent of Police under the appropriate head. Payment may be made direct to the person entitled to receive it from the Permanent Advance allotment of Police Station Expenses of maintenance during the pendency of the case in Court shall be paid from the judicial funds and the prosecuting branch should be responsible for recovering amounts due on this account together with and in the same manner as diet and journey money.
(5) The rates authorised for payment under sub rule (4) above will be notified by District Magistrate in each district from time to time.
6.48. Property not required to be returned – On the conclusion of an investigation the investigating officer shall make over to the proper persons all property which is not further required in connection with the case. A receipt for property so made over shall be taken on the inquest report.
6.49. Recognizances from witnesses – (1) If the facts disclosed by the investigation indicate the commission of a cognizable offence and the person who appears to be guilty of such offence is arrested, the investigating officer shall when he has completed the investigation, take recognizances from the witnesses as provided by law.
(2) The charge sheet and its preparation and submission are dealt with in Chapter VILE, to facilitate compliance with rule 8.1 (4) investigating officer shall, when possible, intimate the Prosecuting Inspector some days in advance the date when the challan and witnesses will reach headquarters.
6.50. Dissemination of Intelligence and hue and cry notices – (1) Every officer proceeding on an investigation shall have with him a supply of blank hue and cry notice (Form 4.18) and shall utilise them as directed in rule 4.18.
(2) Nothing in this rule, or in rule 4.18 shall effect the taking of prompt action under sections 87 & 88, Code of Criminal Procedure, as required by the rule.
6.51. Case diaries – (1) Section 172 (1), Code of Criminal Procedure, requires that a case diary shall be maintained and submitted daily during an investigation by the investigating officer, In such diary shall be recorded concisely and clearly, the steps taken by the police, the circumstances ascertained through the investigation and the other information required by section 172 (1). code of Criminal Procedure.
(2) Cases diaries shall be as brief as possible, shall not be swollen with lengthy explanations and theories, and shall be written in simple Hindi. Only such incidents of the investigation shall be included as have a bearing on the case.
(3) Detailed lists of stolen property, or of property seized in the course of a search, shall be entered in the first case diary submitted after the facts relating to such property were reported to or discovered by, the investigating officer.
(4) The fact that copies of the record prepared under the provisions of section 165, Code of Criminal Procedure, have been sent to the nearest magistrate empowered to take cognizance of the offence shall also be noted.
6.52. Record of case diaries – (1) Case diaries shall ordinarily be submitted in Form 6.52 and each sheet shall be numbered and stamped with the station stamp. Two or more copies, as may be ordered, shall be made by the carbon copying process by the office’ conducting the investigation. The officer writing a case diary shall enter in such diary a list of the statements, recorded under section 161, Criminal Procedure Code, which are attached to such diary and the number of pages of which each such statement consists.
(2) They shall be sent from the scene of investigation to the police station without delay.
(3) On arrival at the police station the number and date of each case diary shall be recorded on the reverse of the police station copy of the first information report, and the date and hour of receipt shall be entered on each copy of the diary.
(4) The original shall be dispatched with as little delay as possible to the Inspector or other superior officer as may be ordered, after the time of dispatch has been entered in the space provided in the form on both the original and the copy or copies. Also see rule 8.31.
(5) A copy of every case diary shall be retained at the police station, a separate file being maintained for each case. Such files shall be destroyed in accordance with the periods fixed in sub rule 8.32 (5).
(6) Copies of all orders received at a police station in connection with case diaries and the replies thereto shall be made on blank sheets of paper and shall be attached to the case diary to which they refer.
6.53. Files of case diaries – (1) When a case is sent for trial the police station file of case diaries shall be forwarded with the challan to the magistrate, and on completion of the trial shall be returned to the police station for record.
(2) Such files when received back at the police station, also files of other cases in which the final report has been submitted, shall be filed at the police station in an annual bundle. A in accordance with the serial number of their first information report.
(3) Copies of case diaries in pending cases shall be kept in files at the police station separate bundle B in accordance with numbers of their first information report.
(4) A list shall be kept in each bundle A and B of all the files contained therein, merely quoting the numbers of their first information reports. Should it be necessary to remove a file from the bundle the fact will be noted in the list.
6.54. Incomplete charge sheet – (1) When an investigating officer requires authority to detain an accused person in police custody beyond the limits prescribed in section 61. Code of Criminal Procedure, he shall make application therefore in accordance with the provisions of section 167, Code of Criminal Procedure,on an incomplete charge sheet in ‘Form 654 (1) to which he shall attach the case diaries or copies thereof.
The Magistrate will record his order on the incomplete charge sheet which will not be returned to the police, but will form part of the Magisterial proceedings. Applications for remand on incomplete charge sheets shall be prepared in duplicate by the carbon copying process, and a copy of the Magistrate’s order will be made by the police officer on the carbon copy of the application which will then be attached to the police file of the case. The copy will be attached to the made by the police officer on the carbon copy of the application which will then be attached to the police file of the case. The copy will be attached to the incomplete charge sheet when the case is finally sent for trial. Case diaries will not form part of the judicial file.
(2) No application for remand to police custody shall be made on the ground that an accused person is likely to confess. Grounds for such an application should be of the following nature :
(a) That it is necessary to have this footprints compared with those found on or near the scene of offence.

(b)That the accused has offered to point out stolen property of weapons or other articles connected with the case.

(c) Any other good and sufficient special reason

(3) Provided that in all serious case, when the accused has been arrested and prima facie evidence has been produced, it shall be incumbent on the investigating officer to send the case for trial without, whether the investigation is complete or not Witness should invariably accompany such challans, and the Court be asked to take up the case at the earliest possible moment, in order to record the evidence and thereafter to grant such detention or demand under the provisions of section 157 or344, Criminal Procedure Code as may be found necessary. Evidence obtained subsequently shall be produced before the court by a subsidiary challan. Superintendents should call up investigating officers for an explanation in all cases where the provision of the rule appear to have been disregarded.
6.55. Close of investigation and final report – (1) If on any day, or days a police officer incharge of the investigation of a case makes no investigation, he shall enter a statement to this effect in the case diary of the day, on which he next does something towards the completion of the case.
(2)(i) When the police are unsuccessful, after taking all the measures in their power, and it is considered advisable to suspend the investigation a final report in Form 6.55 (2) (i) shall be submitted has required by section 173 or Code of Criminal Procedure.
(ii) In cases in which a final report is submit under sub-rule (2) (i) above in which a copy of the first information report has been sent to a Panchayat as required by Police Rule 55 (2) (1) a final report shall also be sent to the Panchayat containing information on the following points.-

(a) Whether or not an offence has been proved.

(b) Whether or not the offence proved is triable by the Panchayat and explaining that the case has not been sent for trial.

(3) If the informant is present when the final report is prepared, he shall be informed verbally of the result of the investigation, and after noting this fact in the final report his signature or thumb mark shall be taken on it . If the informant is not present, he shall be informed in writing by post card or by the delivery of a notice by hand, and the fact this has been done shall be noted in the final report.
In final (untraced or cancelled ) reports the facts of the case which the investigating officer believes to be correct should be summarised, together with the grounds, for his belief Information so recorded should be utilised for the completion of preventive records.
6.56. Provisions of investigation box to the investigating officer. – The investigating officer shall be provided with an investigation box of approved pattern.

CHAPTER VII

Arrest, Escape and Custody

7.1. General powers of arrest – Section 54, Code of Criminal Procedure, authorizes any police officer to arrest without a warrant any person who has been concerned in any cognizable offence or against whom a reasonable complaint has been made, or credible information has been received, or a reasonable suspicion exists, of his having been so concerned. The authority given under this section to the police to arrest without a warrant is, however, permissive and not obligatory. Whenever escape from justice or inconvenient delay is likely to result from the police failing to arrest they are bound to do so; but in no other cases.
The law also allows a police officer in any bailable case to take security under section 170, Criminal Procedure Code from an accused person to appear before a magistrate without first arresting him.
7.2. Power to defer arrest – If the fact that suspicion rests upon a particular person has been kept secret, and there is no risk of his absconding, the police shall defer making the arrest until the investigation is sufficiently complete; but if any interference with the liberty of the accused person is necessary to prevent him form absconding, and the facts justify arrest, the police shall arrest him and shall not interfere with his liberty unless they arrest him.
7.3. Search of persons under arrest – (1) All persons arrested by the police and not admitted to bail shall soon after, be thoroughly searched; in the case of females such search shall be conducted by a woman and shall in all cases be conducted with due regard to decency.
An inventory of all articles taken into custody by the police from such persons under section 51 of the Criminal Procedure Code shall be prepared in duplicate by the carbon copying process and carbon copy thereof shall be sent forthwith to a Magistrate as required by section 523 of the said code.
(2) Every prisoner in police custody shall be searched on first on admission to and on every occasion when he is re admitted to a lock up after being taken any where beyond the precincts of the police station. Sweepers, Bhishtis and every other person other than a police officer having access to a lock-up shall be searched before entering and on leaving. The searching of women shall be done by a woman.
(3) Soldiers in police custody shall not be deprived of their shoulder titles, badges of rank and medal ribbons, but medals shall be taken into safe custody. Sikh prisoners shall be permitted to retain their karas and Hindus their sacred threads.
7.4. Lock ups – (1) Outside every lock up which is guarded by the police shall be displayed a notice showing, in Hindi, the maximum number or prisoners which the lockup is authorized to accommodate. the authorized number shall never be exceeded; any excess shall be accommodated in convenient building under an adequate guard or transferred to the nearest available lock-up
(2) The door of a lock-up shall not be opened except in the presence and by the direct order of the officer commanding the guard, who shall take all possible precautions to prevent a rush or escape, When the circumstances of the use of a particular lock-up are such that prisoners are constantly being admitted or removed, special standing orders for the safe custody of the operation shall be framed by the Superintendent of Police and included in the standing orders for the guard over such lock-up.
(3) When it is necessary to keep prisoners in a lock up which is in an insecure state all male prisoners, who would under the provisions or rules 7.22 and 7.23 be liable to be handcuffed under escort, shall be handcuffed under escort, shall be handcuffed while confined in such lock up.
(4) Every under-trial prisoner in the lock up, unable to provide himself with sufficient bedding, shall be supplied with such beddings as may be necessary.
Ordinarily one blanket and one Durry shall be issued to each prisoner in the summer. In the winter two blankets shall be issued for each prisoner.
Private bedding may be supplied by relatives or friends of the prisoner. All such bedding shall be carefully examined by the police officer incharge who shall return the same when the prisoner is released or remanded to judicial be entered in the station daily diary.
Jail rules permit the use of beds and provide for special sanitary and breathing facilities for A and B convicts. Such facilities are not available in all police stations, but they should be provided for better class prisoners in Police custody so far as is possible. Endeavours should be made to confine better class prisoners in Police Station which posses amenities of this kind and to segregate better class from ordinary prisoners.
7.5. Warrants to be taken out when wanted persons abscond – Permissive authority is given to the police to arrest without warrant in certain cases, in order that they may not be handicapped by having to obtain a magistrate’s warrant under section 204, Code of Criminal Procedure, when the arrest of a criminal or suspect who is present before them is urgent. The law provides, however, no penalty for merely evading arrest by a police officer, thought it penalises resistance to, or escape from, such arrest. On the other hand the law does not provide a severe penalty for recalcitrance to an order in the form of a warrant by a court, entirely irrespective of the evidence of the guilt of the person against whom the warrant is issued. For merely evading obedience to a warrant of arrest, a man is liable to proclamation and the confiscation of his property and any on who harbours him, as defined in section 52-A of the Indian Penal Code, can also be severely punished. Whenever, therefor, a person is wanted, whose whereabouts are not immediately known, the police shall, before setting off a search of him, obtain a warrant of arrest from the Court having jurisdiction Unsuccessful search without such a warrant is merely waste of time, On the other hand if immediately it is found that, inspite of all reasonable effort, a warrant cannot be executed, a proclamation order under section 87, Criminal Procedure Code can be obtained and on proclamation being duly carried out; attachment under section 88, Criminal Procedure Code, can immediately follow, and connivance by any person at the continued absconding of the person proclaimed becomes punishable under section 216, Indian Penal Code.
Note – Under section 200, Clause (aa) Code of Criminal Procedure read with section 204, Code of Criminal Procedure, a police officer can obtain a warrant on a written complaint.

7.6. Illness of persons under arrest. – When a person in police custody is suffering from any illness or injury at the time of arrest, or becomes ill or sustains injury while in such custody. Such a person shall be medically examined at the earliest opportunity so that the nature and cause of the illness or injury may be ascertained and proper treatment given.
7.7. Identification of accused. – (1) whenever there is doubt as to the correctness of a statement made by an arrested person regarding his identity, residence or antecedents, an attestation certificate in Form 7.7 (1) shall at once be dispatched to the officer incharge of the police station the jurisdiction of which such person claims to be resident; such officer shall immediately make, or case to be made all necessary inquiries, and shall ascertain if such person’s name is entered in the village conviction register. The certificate shall be returned completed with as little delay as possible, and shall be attached to the charge the person arrested states he is a resident of the police station in which arrested or of some other police state and whether or not a search slip is dispatched to the Finger Print Bureau.
(2) Detailed orders regarding the preparation of search slips and the finger print system are published in the Police Finger Palm and Foot Print Manual.
7.8. Report of arrest. – (1) Under section 62, Code of Criminal Procedure, and officer incharge of a police station is required to report to the District Magistrate, Sub-Division; Magistrate, or such other magistrate as the district Magistrate may direct, all arrests without warrant made by himself or in his jurisdiction.
(2) Reports of such arrests shall be made in Form 7.8 (2) whether the person arrested had been admitted to bail or not and may be sent by post.
7.9. Arrest on a telegram – (1) In any case in which he has jurisdiction to arrest, a police officer shall take action on a telegram from a police officer or magistrate requiring him to arrest a person for a cognizable offence, but when such telegram is received from a private person he shall not arrest unless the particulars given over a cognizable offence and afford reasonable suspicion that person to be arrested is the offender.
(2) If a telegram is received by a police officer requesting him to arrest a person for an offence appears to such police to be non cognizable he shall lay information before a magistrate having jurisdiction with a view to the issue of a summon or warrant.
If such magistrate declines to issue a summon or warrant the order of the District Magistrate shall be sought.
(3) A police officer who dispatches a telegram to another police officer requesting him to arrest a person without warrant shall be responsible that the information in his possession is sufficient to justify and that the police officer addressed has jurisdiction to make such arrest.
In all such telegrams sufficient particulars shall be given of the person to be arrested and the offence of which he is accused.
7.10. Communication with authorities outside India – Should an occasion arise on which a police officer desires to communicate with any authority outside India in respect of the detection or apprehension of an offender, he should report the facts to the Deputy-Inspector General Criminal Investigation Department.
7.11. Arrest of public servants – Information of the intended arrest of a public servant shall if possible, be given to such public servant’s immediate superior officer before the arrest is made; otherwise information shall be given immediately after arrest.
7.12. Arrest of persons belonging to the Indian Army and instructions regarding Military Criminal jurisdiction. – (1) On the arrest by the police of a person subject to Military or Navy, Airforce law, charged with the commission of an offence, early intimation shall be sent to the officer Commanding the unit to which such person belongs.
(2) The general rules defining the procedure in the case of offences committed by persons subject to the Army Act or the Indian Army Act (VIII of 1911), which can equally be tried by a court-martial or a criminal court, are contained in the Regulations Officer for the Army in India.
7.13. Arrest of deserters. – (1) any Police Officer may, without an order from a magistrate, arrest any person reason reasonably suspected of being a deserter from Army, Navy or Air Force.
(2) Deserters shall not be taken unnecessarily through crowded streets, bazars, and thorough-fares.
(3) A deserter should be brought before the nearest Magistrate of the nearest Military Commanding Officer when no Magistrate is readily accessible. All deserters shall, as soon as possible after arrest, be handed over to military custody.
(4) A register of deserters in Form 7.13. (4) shall be maintained in the office of each Superintendent of Police (see also rule 3.44).
(5) Descriptive rolls of deserters shall if necessary, be published in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette in Form 7.13 (5).
7.14. Arrest on warrants under Gambling Ordinance. – Warrants issued under Gambling Ordinance shall be executed or, if not executed, shall be returned to the magistrate or Superintendent who issued it, within a period of not more than 15 days from the date of issue. The magistrate or Superintendent with then cancel the warrant, but a fresh warrant can be immediately applied for or issued, if necessary.
7.15. Arrest of civil prisoners – Under the provisions of section 225-B Indian Penal Code, the police are bound to arrest a civil prisoner who offers any resistance or illegal obstruction to his lawful apprehension, or who escapes or attempts to escape from lawful custody when such resistance, obstruction, escape or attempt to escape is an offence.
7.16. Arrest of women. – (1) All arrests of women-whether without warrant or with a warrant bailable or non-bailable shall be carried out by police officers not below the rank of Assistant Sub-Inspector of police or, when no such officer can be made available, by a head constable in presence of responsible male relatives and village or town officials. Such arrest shall be specially reported in the manner prescribed in police rule 5.10 and, when the arrest has been made by an officer of rank lower than assistant sub-inspector, the reason shall be clearly explained. Superintendents of Police shall forward special reports as required by police rule 5.12 and a copy shall be sent to the Deputy. Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department Rajasthan in those cases only in which the woman is not sent to judicial custody or released on bail immediately. Where bail is admissible the woman should not be detained longer than is necessary for the production of the bond or sureties. No application for remand to police custody shall be made without the special order of gazetted officer.
(2) No women in police custody shall be lodged even for night in police station except in unavoidable circumstances. They shall be placed a once before a magistrate for remand to judicial custody, except where a remand for police custody is necessary and has been obtained in accordance with(1) above. Women remanded to judicial custody shall be immediately transferred to head quarters for properly equipped sub-divisional female judicial lock ups. All remands to judicial custody shall be reported immediately to the district Magistrate. The gazetted officer supporting an application for remand to police custody shall be responsible for the taking of necessary measures for the safe and decent custody of the prisoner. Where women in police custody have to be escorted about for the purpose of investigation, the officer incharge of the purpose of investigation, the officer incharge of the police party shall not be below the rank of assistant sub inspector provided that, when no assistant sub inspector is posted to the police station concerned, a head constable may be placed in charge of the escort.
(3) No male person under the age of 15 years or woman shall be required to attend at any place other than the place in which such male person or woman resides. If it is necessary to take a woman witness about the countryside for identification, etc., she shall be accompanied by a responsible male relative or other respectable male neighbour. Gazetted officer hearing and passing orders on such cases shall take such steps as are necessary to ensure that the above orders are scrupulously observed.
7.17. Arrest of drunken persons. – A drunken person may only be arrested by a police officer in a road, street or thorough-fare, in a town or notified area to which Police Act 1861 (V of 1861) applies and only when such person is drunk within the view of the police officer and behaves so as to cause obstruction, inconvenience, annoyance, risk, danger or damage to residents wad passengers.
7.18. Stoppage of trains at non stop station to arrest person. – On receipt of a requisition, in writing from a magistrate r,r a police officer, not below gazetted rank, a train shall be stopped by a station master at a station at which it is not booked to stop, with a view to affecting the arrest of a person or persons travelling by it. such requests shall be made only in special and urgent cases.
7.19. Transfers of arrested persons – (1) If a police officer lawfully arrests an person, without warrant in a district in which the investigation, enquiry and trial cannot be held, and the offence is non-bailable or such person cannot give bail, he shall take or send such person before the District Magistrate or 1st class Magistrate having jurisdiction over the area and obtain an order for the transfer of the prisoner to the district in which the offence was committed.
(2)No accused or convicted person shall be taken in custody from one state to another, except under the written order or warrant of the magistrate or authority directing such transfer.
7.20. Ball and recognizance – (1) When a person accused of a bail able offence can give good and sufficient bail, the police shall accept it unless the law requires such person to be brought before the magistrate having jurisdiction.
(2) An officer incharge of a police station is empowered under section 497 (1) Code of Criminal Procedure to release on bail a person accused of a non-bailable offence (non punishable with death or transportation for life) whom he has arrested or detained without warrant These powers are permissive and not obligatory and should be exercised with caution. The police officer must satisfy himself that the release on bail is not likely unduly to prejudice the prosecution or to be followed by absconding of person ‘prima fade’ guilty.
(3) An officer incharge of a police station shall, in accordance with section 497 (2) Code of Criminal. Procedure at any stage of an investigation release on bail or recognizance a person accused of a non bailable offence when it appears that there are not reasonable grounds for believing that a non bailable offence has been committed by him, although sufficient grounds may exist for further investigation .
(4) Before any person is released on bail or recognizance due regard should be paid to the provisions of section 498 and 499, Code of Criminal Procedure.
(5) In every case of release on bail or recognizance whether under section 167 or section 497, Code of Criminal Procedure, full reasons shall be recorded in a case diary, and the police officer concerned shall preserve the bond [form 7.20 (5)], until it is discharged either by the appearance of accused person or by the order of a competent court.
(6) No police officer has power to rearrest an accused person who has been released on bail under section 497, Code of Criminal Procedure. When rearrest is deemed necessary, the police shall apply to a competent court for the cancellation of the cancellation of the bail bond and the issue of a warrant in accordance with the provisions of section 497 (5), Code of Criminal Procedure.
7.21. Classification of under trial prisoners – Under trial prisoners are divided into two classes based on previous standard of living. The classifying authority is the trying court subject to the approval of the district Magistrate but during the period before a prisoner is brought before a competent court, discretion shall be exercised by the officer in-charge of the police station concerned to classify him as either `better-class’ or ‘ordinary’ Only those prisoners should be classified provisionally as ‘better class’ who by social status, education or habit of life have been accustomed to a superior mode of living. The fact, that the prisoner is to be tried for the commission of any particular class of offers of offence is not to be considered. The possession of a certain degree of literacy is in itself not sufficient for ‘better class’ classification and no under trial prisoner shall be classified whose mode of living does not appear to the police Officer concerned to have been definitely superior to that of the police Officer concerned to have been definitely superior to that of the ordinary run of the population, whether urban or rural. Under-trial prisoners classified as ‘better class’ shall be given the diet on the same scale as prescribed for A and B class convict prisoners.

7.22. Conditions in which handcuffs are to be used – (1) Every male person falling within the following category who has to be escorted in Police custody and whether under police arrest, remand or trial, shall provided that he appears to be in health and not incapable of effective resistance by reason of age, be carefully handcuffed on arrest and before removal from any building from which he may be taken after arrest.
(a) Persons accused of a non- bailable offence punishable with any sentence exceeding in severity a term of three years’ imprisonment.

(b) Persons accused of an offence punishable under section 148 or 226, Indian Penal Code.

(c) Person accused of, and previously convicted of, such an offence as to bring the case under section 75, Indian Penal Code.

(d) Desperate Characters.

(e) Persons who are violent disorderly or obstructive or acting in a manner calculated to provoke popular demonstration.

(f) Persons who are likely to attempt to escape or to commit suicide or to be the object of an attempt rescue. This rule shall apply whether the prisoners are escorted by road or in a vehicle.

(2) Better class under trial prisoners must only be handcuffed when this is regarded as necessary for safe custody. When a better class prisoner is handcuffed for reasons other than those contained in (a), (b) and (c) of sub-rule (1) the officer responsible shall enter in the Station Daily or other appropriate record his reason for considering the use of handcuff, necessary
Note: – For the definition of better class prisoner see. rule 7.21

7.23. Condition in which use of handcuffs may be dispensed with – (1) Prisoners shall not be handcuffed while confined in a lick-up, except as provided in rule 7.4 (3).
(2) The handcuffs of prisoners in court shall be remove only as provided in rule 8.10 (2)
(3) A prisoner who is charged only under section 124. A or 153 A or the Indian Penal Code shall not be handcuffed unless, he is already undergoing sentence or the officer commanding the escort has definite reason for believing that such prisoner comes within the category described in rule 7.22(e) or (f).
7.24. Security of handcuffs – When handcuffs are used, are used, the senior officer present shall be responsible that they fit properly and that the prisoner cannot get at the key.
7.25. Arrest of sick or wounded persons – (1) if wounded or seriously ill, and in need of medical attendance, a person accused of a non-bailable offence, or unable to furnish bail in a bailable offence, if possible be conveyed to the hospital at the district head quarters or to a neighbouring dispensary.
(2) The police shall take measures to ensure his safe custody in hospital and the magistrate having jurisdiction shall be asked to grant a remand, if necessary, to examine such person.
(3) if such person cannot be moved without risk of his life, the magistrate having jurisdiction shall be asked to record his statement at the place where he is lying
7.26. Production of accused before magistrate within 24 hours – The case of an accused person sent in custody for trial shall be brought before the court having jurisdiction as soon as possible after the arrival of the accused person at the station at which the court sits. In no case shall an accused person having in custody on a close holiday or after the courts have risen, to placed in the police lock-up for more than 24 hours. If the second day after arrival is a close holiday, application for remand shall be made immediately.
(2) Every person who is arrested and detained in police custody shall be produced before the nearest magistrate within a period of twenty-four hours of such arrest excluding the time necessary for the journey from place of arrest to the court of the Magistrate and no such person shall be detained in custody beyond the said period without the authority of a Magistrate.
(3) If an accused person is in custody charged with an offence in which bail may be taken by the police it shall be the duty of the police to facilitate any attempt to find bail for such person.
7.27. Diet of accused persons – (1) Officer incharge of police station shall arrange for the dieting of such accused persons arrested by the police as do not provide their own diet. The sum expended on the diet of each individual shall not exceed the scale prescribed from time to time by the state Government.
The police shall provide for dieting on and from, the date of arrest to,and for, the date on which the accused is placed in the magisterial lock-up
(2) All food brought for the prisoner by relatives or friends shall be made over to the police station clerk or head constable in command of the guard and shall be examined for prohibited or injurious articles as can be detected by eye. After such examination the food shall be given to the prisoner by a Police Officer. The person bringing the food shall have no access to the prisoner.
(3) In the report in the station daily diary regarding the first admission of a prisoner to a lock-up, It shall be stated whether he is to be dieted at Government expense or by friends. In the latter case the name of the persons who undertakes responsibility for the prisoner’s feeding shall be entered.
7.28. Interviews With prisoners. – No person shall be allowed to communicate in any way with a prisoner in a police lock-up without the permission of the officer incharge of the police station (as defined in section 4 (p), Criminal Procedure Code), or written authority from a judicial or superior police officer.
(2) Authorised interviews shall take place in the presence and hearing of the police sentry, and the interviewer shall stand sufficiently far from the bars of the lock-up to prevent physical contact or the passage of prohibited articles between him and the prisoner. When a lawyer wishes to consult and advise a prisoner confidentially as to the conduct of his case, the prisoner may be removed from the lock-up and allowed to sit apart with his lawyer but within the precincts of the police station and in the sight of the sentry. At the conclusion of such an interview the prisoner shall be searched as provided in sub-rule 6.32.
7.29. Orders to be hung up outside lock-ups – A printed copy, in Hindi or rules 7.3, 7.27 and 7.28 shall be hung up outside every police lock-up as a standing order for sentries and information of the public.
7.30. Death in police custody – When any person dies while in the custody of the police, the officer incharge of the guard, escort or police station as the case may be, shall make an immediate report of the fact to the nearest magistrate empowered to hold inquest (section 176, Code of Criminal Procedure).
(2) For the purpose of this rule, a prisoner in a magisterial lock up is concerned to be in the custody of the turn key and a prisoner in prison or prison camp in the custody of the Jailor.
7.31. Identification of suspects. – (1) The following general instructions should be kept in view at an identification parade of a suspect :-
(a) All efforts should be made to have the identification proceedings of a suspect conducted before a magistrate.

(b) Identification proceedings should be held soon after the arrest of suspects.

(c) Identification proceedings may be either held in Jail, court room or elsewhere. But it should be ensured that the identifying witnesses had no opportunity to see a suspect before hand.

(d) It should be vouchsafed that a suspect put to identification proceedings has been put under veil (Baparda) since the time of arrest, till the proceedings for his identification are actually arranged. A record to that effect should be maintained in General diary and at the jail at the time of his admission in the jail record, when the suspect is handed over to the jail authorities.

(e) The identifying witnesses should be kept separate from each other and at such a distance from the place of identification as shall render it impossible for them to see the suspects or any of the persons concerned in the proceedings, until they are called up to make their identification.

(f) The suspects should be placed among other persons similarly dressed and of the same stature in the proportion of eight to ten persons to one suspect. There should be resemblance in facial out-look of persons so mixed up with that of the suspects. Each witness has to be called up separately to attempt has identification before the proceedings actually commence. Care shall be taken that the remaining witnesses are still kept out of sight and hearing and that no opportunity is afforded for communications to pass between witnesses who have been called up, and those who have not.

(g) The results of the test shall be recorded in the Form 7.31 (i) (g) as prescribed by the General Rules (Criminal) 1952 by a magistrate conducting the identification proceedings. The same course may be adopted by the other agency carrying on these proceedings. The form should invariably be signed by the magistrate or other authority on the conclusion of the proceedings. The identifying witness should also sign the form. This has to be done by the magistrate and the witnesses in token of the correctness of the proceedings. It is important that once the arrangements for the proceedings have been undertaken, the officer conducting and any police officer assisting him in that investigation should have no access what so ever either to the suspects or to the witnesses.

(h) Proceedings of the nature described above are extra judicial. It is not the duty of the officer conducting them or of the independent witnesses to record statements or cross examine either suspects or identifying witnesses, but they should be requested to question the latter as to the circumstances in which they saw the suspect whom they claim to identify and to record the answer in the proper column of the form. While every precaution shall be taken to prevent collusion, the identifying witnesses must be given a fair chance, and conditions must not be imposed, which would make it impossible for a person honestly capable of making an identification, to do so. In this connection it is of paramount importance that no alteration in any way of the personal appearance of unconvicted persons should be made so as to made it difficult to recognize them.

(2) The following precautions as to time of identification proceedings are necessary :-
(a) It has to be particularly seen that a suspect should be made to wear the clothes in which he was originally admitted to jail.

(b) There should be no fetters on.

(c) The accused can be given option to change places at will, but cannot be allowed either to conceal his face or stature so as to imbede recognition and to exchange his clothing.

(d) The witnesses are to be called one by one asked to single out the person or persons they had come to identify and to mention the action they had identified him or them.

(e) Every precaution should be taken to ensure that no succeeding witness communicated in any manner with the preceding one.

(3) As mentioned above only the investigating officers are precluded from being present at the identification parade and witnessing the proceedings.
Prosecuting inspectors and prosecuting sub-inspectors may watch the proceedings impartially without impairing their fairness.
7.32. Identification of property – (i) It is of utmost importance the articles of property seized by the investigating agency shall be properly sealed on the spot and it should be ensured that the seals are intact.
(ii) The number of articles to be mixed up with the articles of property required to be put to identification test should rest with the magistrate before whom the proceedings are to be carried on.

(iii) The articles of property to be mixed up to with the articles of property put for the purpose of identification should be contained in sealed bundles.

(iv) The seal must be all along intact and can only be opened before the magistrate conducting the identification proceedings.

(v) As in the identification parade of suspects, witnesses are to be called one by one and on succeeding witness should communicate in any manner with the proceeding one.

(vi) It is also important to note that the articles to be mixed up should be similar in appearance to those for identification.

(vii) The prosecuting inspector or the prosecuting sub-inspector may be present at the time of identification proceedings.

(viii) The articles to be mixed up should be arranged for production according to the instructions of the Government which they may issue in this behalf. However, there should be given no chance. whatsoever for an objection that the articles brought for begin mixed up were exposed to the identifying witness before identification proceedings took place. The arranging of such articles to all intents and purposes should be by an agency other than the police.

(xi) Proceedings of the identification of property shall be recorded in Form 7.32. (IX).

CHAPTER VIII

Prosecution and Court Duties

8.1. Charge sheet preparations and scrutiny of – (1) When an accused person is sent for trial the charge sheet [Form 5.64 (1)] shall form the final report required by section 173, Code of Criminal Procedure. Loose Forms of charge sheets shall be kept at each police station to enable investigating officers to prepare and submit them even when away from their police station.
(2) Charge sheets shall be submitted through the Circle Officers Incharge of the Crime of the Police Station concerned.
(3) Charges sheets shall be thoroughly scrutinised by an officer of the prosecuting branch not below the rank of Prosecuting Sub-Inspector who shall be responsible for seeing that carbon copies of incomplete charge sheets together with the copies of orders passed by Magistrate thereon and other necessary papers are attached; that the identity and previous convictions, of the accused persons have been established; that the identity and previous convictions, of the accused persons have been established; that, in cases when an accused person is on security and such security will be liable to confiscation in the event of conviction,the fact is duly noted in the file so that the attention of the court may be drawn to it; that witnesses are according to the list entered in the charge sheet, that the police file is complete and that no papers belonging to it are attached with the charge sheet, and that no omissions of or defects in the investigation remain unratified or unexplained. After completing his scrutiny as above, the officer of the prosecuting branch shall lay the charge sheet and files before the Circle officer and shall explain the case to him, and take his orders as to whether it shall be put into court or withheld for further police action. Such circle officer shall satisfy himself that the prosecution case is presented in the best possible manner that all material evidence is produced, including evidence calculated to rebut probable lines of defence.
(4) Before sending a charge sheet to headquarters the investigating officer should collect all witnesses whom it has been decided to produce in court, and take personal recognizances from them to appear on the same date as that on which the charge sheet will reach the court. The challan should reach headquarters not less than one day before the date fixed for hearing of the case. It shall be the duty of the prosecuting branch to facilitate the working of this system and the prompt disposal of police cases by arranging with magistrate that a special period be set apart daily for dealing with fresh challans and by giving magistrate as much warning as possible of the anticipated presentation of challan (vide rule 6.49). This period should be so fixed as to allow time for witnesses to reach the police officer and for challans to be thoroughly checked and at the same time to permit of all new police cases being taken up by magistrate as such an hour that it may be possible for the bulk of the prosecution evidence to be recorded before the court rises for the day. When there are large number of prosecution witnesses in a case only the more important ones, whose evidence is necessary to facilitate the early framing of charges, shall be sent with the challan.
(5) In all serious cases, when the accused has been arrested and prime facie evidence has been produced, the investigating officer shall send the accused for trial without delay, whether the investigation is complete of not. Witnesses should accompany such challans and the same arrangements for the prompt recording of evidence as laid down in sub-rule (4) above should be ‘observed. When available evidence has been recorded, remands or adjournments under section 167 or344, Code of Criminal Procedure, shall be arranged as may be necessary. Evidence obtained subsequently shall be produced before the court by subsidiary challan.
8.2. Charge sheet slip and road certificate – (1) With every charge sheet shall be sent-
(a) A charge sheet slip in Form 8.2 (1)(a).

(b) A road certificate.

(2) On the completion of the case in court the charge sheet slip shall be filed in under the orders of the criminal court trying the case and returned to the Circle Officer concerned. The result of the case shall then be entered in the Crime Register and communicated to the Police station concerned.
(3) In the road certificate shall be entered a list of any weapons, articles or property sent to the magistrate’s court in connection with the case. If such articles are received correctly the prosecuting, inspector or sub-inspector shall sign i receipt for them on the road certificate and
return it to the police station.
8.3. Duties of public prosecutors- – (1) The public prosecutors are bound by the rules contained in Chapter I of part I .of the Rajasthan Law and Judicial Department Manual, they perform the following duties in Criminal court, viz.,-
(a) He shall conduct the prosecution all cases committed to the court of sessions in the area for which he is appointed.

(b) He shall appear when instructed by the District Magistrate in appeals, references, revisions and other miscellaneous criminal proceedings before such court of sessions;and

(c) He shall appear when instructed by the District Magistrate in any criminal proceedings in any court, at the headquarters of the district in which he resides.

(d) He maybe instructed by the District Magistrate to appear in any criminal proceedings in any other court in area for which he is appointed, provided he is willing to act and can do so without determent to the discharge of his other duties.

(2) He shall also advice the Collector and Departmental officers in Civil matters of an urgent nature whenever there is no time to make a reference to the Legal Remembrancer.
8.4. Police officers as public prosecutors – (1) All Superintendents-Assistant and Deputy Superintendents of police are with reference to sections 270 and 492 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, ex-officio public prosecutors in respect of all cases committed from their respective districts for trial before the court of Sessions. Where no Government Pleader (Public Prosecutor) has been appointed, or when the services of the government Pleader not available, one of the police officers about mentioned may conduct the prosecution in Sessions trials, but the District Magistrate has power in such circumstances, to appoint any other person to be public prosecutor for the purpose of a particular case.
(2) Prosecuting inspectors and prosecuting sub-inspectors of police are appointed public prosecutors in the local areas specified in the list below for all cases which may be required into or be tried by a magistrate including a magistrate having powers under section 30 of the Code of Criminal Procedure.
Officers

Local Area

Every Prosecuting Inspector of Police.

The district in which in which the Prosecuting inspector is Stationed.

Every Prosecuting sub-inspector of police stationed at the headquarters of a district.

The district at the headquarters of which the prosecuting sub inspector is stationed.

Every prosecuting sub-inspector of police stationed at the headquarters of a sub-division.

The Sub-division at the head quarters of which the prosecuting sub-inspector is stationed.

(3) When the complainant in a criminal case instructs a legal practitioner to conduct the prosecution, such practitioner shall act under the instructions of the Public Prosecutor as defined in the above Sub-rules and rule 8.3.
8.5. Prosecution of cases under section 110, Code of Criminal Procedure – Prosecution, under section 110, Code of Criminal Procedure, shall as far as possible, be arranged to take place before a magistrate in camp in the neighbourhood frequented by the persons so prosecuted.
8.6. Action on breach of terms of security Bonds Conditions of restriction – (1) Whenever a person on security of any kind is prosecuted for an offence implying a breach of the terms or his bond, special application shall be made, at time of presentation of the charge sheet, that the court may in the event of conviction, order the confiscation of the security.
(2) When a person violates the conditions of an order passed against him under the Habitual Offenders Act or violates any rule made under the act, he shall be prosecuted under that Act.
(3) It is duty of the prosecuting branch to watch the progress of realisation of forfeited security. When the head of the branch finds that either generally in the district or in a particular case under delay or laxity in realisation is taking place, he shall bring the matter to the notice of the Superintendent, in order that the attention of the District Magistrate may be invited to it.
8.7. Police Brief – (1) In all important cases sent for trial, the investigating officer shall, whenever possible, attend and personally instruct the prosecuting inspector or public prosecutor. In such he will also prepare a :Police Brief in Form 8.7 (1) and shall mention therein all matters connected with the case including the probable line of the defence, which in his opinion, should be specially brought to the notice of the prosecutor.
(2) In unimportant simple case no`Police Brief’ need be prepared.
(3) In cases of more than usual importance gazetted officers are required to prepare ‘Police Brief’ themselves.
8.8. Proof of previous conviction. – (1) Previous conviction shall be proved as laid down in section 511, Code of Criminal Procedure.
(2) Requisitions for particulars of previous convictions when required by the police shall be made in Form 8.8 (2).
(3) It is the duty of the police, in conducting the investigation, to take proper steps to establish the identity of an accused person and to obtain and produce evidence of previous convictions against him.
Requisitions for particulars of previous convictions, should be made early during the investigation, if there be sufficient grounds prosecuting officers may apply the magistrate of a remand under section 334, Criminal Procedure Code, so as to produce evidence or previous convictions.
8.9. Appeals and access to Judicial record. – (1) Applications for the representation of the State in criminal cases for the institution of appeals against. orders of acquittal or for the exercise of its powers of revision by the Court, shall be made through the District Magistrate.
(2) As regards revision of orders of discharge application shall be made to the district Magistrate under section 437, Code of Criminal Procedure.
(3) Superintendents of Police shall peruse the judicial record in all cases where a police officer is convicted or, through acquitted, is left under suspicion or censured. The object of this is to enable departmental action to be taken when necessary. Copies of judgments and translations of the same where necessary, in such cases, will be supplied free of charge.
The Inspector General of Police or any Deputy Inspector General may, on giving reasons, call for the record of any decided case, in which the police are affected. Unless there are grave reasons to the contrary, in which case the Sessions Judge will decide the point, the request will be complied with. The Inspector General of Police has a right to call for the records in all cases of professional crime.
Courts are required to send to the inspector General of Police for record copies of such confessions as may be of value to the police.
All modifications of original decisions made in appeal revision or reference are required to be communicated by the District Magistrate to the prosecuting branch of the office of Superintendent of Police.
Copies of judgments and depositions required by police officers in the course of their duties are exempted from the charges authorized under the Court Fees Act. Gazetted officers and all prosecuting inspectors and prosecuting sub inspectors, within the limits of their jurisdiction as public prosecutors (rule 8.4) can obtain free of all charges, copies of any part of the record of a case, which they may require in their capacity as public prosecutor, the cost being met by District Magistrate or the Courts concerned.
With the exceptions noted above, police officers are not entitled either to have original judicial records handed over to them for perusal or 40 obtain copies free of charge. On the frequent occasions when it is necessary for Superintendent of Police, in the discharge of his duties, to study the evidence and decisions recorded at a trial, the proper channel for obtaining access to such records is through the authority of the District Magistrate, when a perusal of the original record will suffice, copies should be dispensed with.It is the practice of the High court to print the proceedings in all cases in which the death sentence is inflicted, and it is sometimes possible in such cases to obtain spare copies of the printed records on application through the Deputy Inspector General of Police, Criminal Investigation Department, to the registrar of the High court.
8.10. Maintenance of order and watch over prisoners in court – (1) on every day when the courts are sitting, a sufficient number of police shall be provided in the precincts of the courts to guard prisoners. Take it to custody persons who surrender to their bail, whose bail bonds are cancelled, or who may otherwise be arrested by the order of a court, and to preserve order in and in the neighbourhood of courts. The guard in court shall be strengthened when prisoners are of a desperate and dangerous character or, when a case is being heard which is likely to cause public excitement or demonstrations.
(2) All prisoners under arrest shall invariably be thoroughly searched before being taken into court; the police officer in command of the part furnishing guards for prisoners shall be personally responsible that this is done. If in accordance with rule 7.23, prisoners have been brought to the court in handcuffs, the handcuffs shall be removed in court unless this is specially ordered by the presiding officer.
8.11. Compounding of case under section 420, Indian Penal Code – Sanction to compromise in case under section 420, Indian Penal Code, should be resisted, where habitual cheats and professional swindlers are concerned, and also in all cases which show features of danger to a wider public than the complainant in the individual case before the court. a case coming into the latter category would be one in which the method by which the crime has been committed is or is likely to be widely employed.
8.12. Prosecuting agency-composition of – (1) The police prosecuting agency in each district shall consist of such number of gazetted and sub-ordinate officers, as may, from time to time, be sanctioned by the State Government.
(2) A Constable shall be attaches as court orderly to the court of every magistrate having first class or superior powers.
8.13. Duties of head of prosecuting agency – The duties of the head of the police prosecuting agency whether he be of the rank of Deputy Superintendent of police or Inspector or Sub-Inspector, shall be as follows:
(i) Thoroughly to scrutinise challans and intermediate references and applications from police stations in connection with the prosecution of cases, the arrest of offenders, the confiscation of bail or security bonds, and other matters in which his advice or the orders of a court are required. The preparation for court and prosecution of all security cases, including security for keeping the peace (vide rule4.28), should receive as much attention from the district prosecuting staff as is practicable.

(ii) To prosecute, watch or direct the prosecution of cases in the courts of the district. In this connection it must be realised that his duty embraces not only the presentation of the prosecution case but contesting the claims of the defence and ensuring the observance of conditions and restrictions imposed by the law on the discretion of courts to pass orders in certain circumstances, and the observance of all High court orders issued with the object of expediting decisions and preventing abuses.

(iii) To supervise and distribute the work of prosecuting officer subordinate to him and of the police personnel attached to his office or to the courts.

(iv) To Supervise the transmission of warrants and summons to the executive police under the orders of the criminal courts,and to see that returns to such processes are made without delay.

(v) To keep the District Magistrate and the Superintendent of Police informed of all important matters in connection with criminal cases under trial, to bring to notice cases requiring to be specially reported to him and to submit daily in Form 8.13 (v) showing cases sent for trial, convicted, discharged and pending in court on that particular day.

(vi) To see that the instructions in connection with the diet money and travelling expenses of witness are duly observed :

(vii) To see that payments for bills submitted through him for all judicial expenses incurred by the officers incharge of police stations are made properly. For this purpose he will maintain a register in Form 8.13 (vii). For all sums of money received from the Nazir a receipt must be given in the prescribed form.

Note: – One combined receipt for all sums received from the Nazir on any one day may be given.

(viii) To see that the results of cases in court are promptly communicated to police stations concerned according to rule, and especially to bring to the notice of the Superintendent, together with an abstract or copy of the judgment, if necessary. Orders of acquittal or discharge or other orders of courts, which either reflect in any way on the conduct of the police or indicate that the theory on which the case was prosecuted has broken down.

(ix) To keep in view the orders regarding the formation of criminal museum at the Police Training School, Kishangarh, and to take the orders of the Superintendent for the acquisition of such weapons, instruments or other articles connected with cases sent up for trial as may be considered useful as exhibits of educational value, and to forward them with a brief account of their use or object to the Principal, Police Training School, Kishangarh.

(x) To supervise the work of the Hindi office of the Superintendent of Police and to exercise a close and constant check on the maintenance of registers pertaining to the prosecution branch. In these respects the prosecuting Deputy Superintendent or Inspector is directly responsible as assistant to the Superintendent of Police.

(xi) In the execution of these functions, the head of the prosecuting agency may distribute work and delegate his duties among and to prosecuting inspectors and Sub-inspectors subordinate to him, to such extent as may be approved by the Superintendent of Police and as is not inconsistent with any Police Rule or other order of a competent authority.

8.14. Registers to be maintained by prosecuting Deputy Superintendent or the Inspector, or Sub Inspector – The need of Police Prosecuting agency shall, with the help of his assistants, maintain the following registers :-
(1) Register of warrants and summons received for execution and service by the police in Form 8.14 (1).
This register may be destroyed two years after being completed.
(3) Register of persons on security under the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, or local and special Laws, in Form 8.14(3).
This register shall be divided into separate parts for each police station in the district.
At the end of each year the names of those persons remaining on security shall be rewritten in the order in which their securities are timed to expire.
(4) Register of excise cases occurring during the year in which police officers have been directly concerned, in Form 8.14 (4).
(5) Permanent advance account of all judicial expenses in prescribed form.
This register may be destroyed three years being completed.
(6) Register of absconders„ in Form 4.20 (1).
(7) Register showing progress of action against absconders in Form 4.21.
8.15. Prosecuting agency to attend office when courts are closed – At district headquarters, on days on which the courts are closed, an officer of the prosecuting branch not less in the rank than a sub-inspector shall attend the office of the Superintendent to receive accused persons, weapons, articles and property and to transact urgent business. At magisterial outposts the prosecuting sub-inspector and court orderly respectively shall attend the police station for the same purpose.
8.16. Duties of prosecuting Sub Inspector and court orderlies – (1) Prosecuting sub-inspectors at sub-division of district shall perform the duties detailed in clauses (i) to(iv)and (vi)to (ix) or rule 8.13 As regards clause (v) of rule 8.13 the prosecuting sub-inspector in a sub-division shall have the same duties in relation to the gazetted police officer incharge of the sub-division and the sub-division officer as the head of the prosecuting agency has in relation to the Superintendent of Police and the District Magistrate. He shall also submit to the gazetted officer incharge of the sub-division a daily diary in Form 8.13. (b).
(2) In sub-divisions of district all registers prescribed in rule 8.14 shall be maintained by the prosecuting agency.
(3) Rule 8.15 to Rule 8.16 shall apply mutatis mutandis to all posecuting sub-inspectors at sub-division.
(4) Court orderlies in all courts are responsible that order is kept in courts under the direction of magistrates. They will obey all orders given to them by the officers prosecuting cases and will take charge of exhibits and the police files of cases-when orders to do so.
8.17. Supply of copies under sections 162 and 173, (4), Code of Criminal Procedure – After forwarding a report Under/section 173, Code of Criminal Procedure, the officer incharge of the police station shall, before commencement of the enquiry or trial, furnish or cause to be furnished to the accused free of cost, a copy of the report forwarded under sub section (i) of section 173, Criminal Procedure Code and of the first information report recorded Under/section 154, Criminal procedure Code & of all other documents or relevant extracts thereof on which the prosecution proposes to rely, including the statement and confession, if any, recorded Under/section 161, Criminal Procedure Code and the statements recorded under sub-section (3) of section 161, Code of Criminal Procedure of all the persons whom the prosecution proposes to examine as its witnesses.
8.18. Production of police records as evidence – (1) A police officer is bound, under the provisions of section 162 of the evidence Act (1 of 1872),to produce any document in his possession or power if summoned to do so, but if such document is an unpublished official record relating to any affair of State, he is prohibited by section 123 of the same Act from giving evidence derived from it.
(2) The following police records are privileged under section 123, Evidence Act If their production is demanded, a certificate in form 8.18 (2) must be obtained from the inspector General by the Police officer called upon to produce them. The Inspector General may at his discretion allow evidence derived from such documents to be given and in order to enable him to exercise this discretion it is important that a police officer claiming privilege in respect of any document, should submit either the original document, a copy, or a full translation of it Hindi, together with a report indicating why it is necessary to claim privilege and also that his claim is justified.
(i) The Surveillance register (Rule 4.4).

(ii) Village Crime Register, Part IV (Rule 3.47),

(iii) History Sheets (Rule 4.9).

(iv) Bad Character Rolls and Information Sheets (Rules 4.16 and 4.17)

(v) Case Diaries.

(vi) All unpublished orders of Government or of the Inspector General of Police contained in files or in the police gazette.

(vii) All documents or orders which are classed as ‘Secret’ or Confidential.

(3) While the prohibition of the giving of evidence derived from other police records is not absolute, the provisions of section 124 Evidence Act, permit a police officer to refuse to disclose orders or other communications made to him in the course of his official duties, when he considers that the public interest would suffer by such disclosure.
(4) When the production of official correspondence is question, the head of the office possessing such correspondence has authority to grant or withheld permission under section 123 of the Evidence. Act. In exercising this discretion he shall be guided by the general rule that correspondence may not be produced without the permission of the highest authority concerned in it.
8.19. Co-operation of Jail officials in identification of prisoners – Information that a convicted prisoner has not been identified should invariably be given to the Superintendent of the Jail concerned. Under the provisions of the Jail Manual such prisoners are required to be specially classified and the Superintendent of the Jail is required to furnish the police with the names and particulars of all persons who visit them and with clue as to their identity which may be obtained form examination of letters dispatched by or addressed to them.
8.20. Assaults on Police prosecution for – When assaults are committed upon the members of the police force while in the execution of their duties, the prompt prosecution of the offenders should be arranged for, if possible at, or near, the scene of the offence, adequate sentences being pressed by the prosecuting agency.
8.21. Diet of accused persons – The instructions regarding the dieting of accused persons arrested by the police and the recovery diet money are contained in rule 7.27.
8.22. Record of conviction – Conviction and orders to execute bonds in all cognizable police cases shall be entered in (a) the Crime Register which is maintained in the office of the Circle Officer, and (b) in the First Information Report Register which is maintained at the police station reporting the offence. Convictions and orders in the cases detailed below shall also be entered in (c) the Conviction Register which, for the purpose of section 75, Indian Penal Code, is maintained in each police station as prescribed in Chapter IV.


I – (Indian Penal Code)

Chapter

Sections

XI

193 to 195

Giving or fabricating false evidence.

211 to 377

False charge of committing an unnatural offence.

XII

231 to 232

Counterfeiting of coin.

233 to 235

Making, buying, selling or having in possession instruments of material for counterfeiting coin.

236

Abetting the counterfeiting of coin out of India.

XIII

237 to 238

Import or export of counterfeit coins.

239 to 240 242 to 243

Possession or delivery of counterfeit coin.

244

Unlawful alteration of weight or composition of coins by person employed in Mints.

245

Unlawful removal of coining instruments from mints.

246 to 253

Unlawful alteration of weight, composition or appearance of coin and Possession and delivery of such coins.

255

Counnterfeiting of Government stamps.

256 to 257

Making, buying, selling of having in possession instruments or material for counterfeiting Government stamps.

258 to 259

Possession or sale of conterfeit Government stamps.

260

Using of counterfeit stamps.

261 to 263

Fraudulent effactment or erasure of government stamps.

XVI

311

Being a Thug.

354

Indecent assault on a woman.

363 to 369

Kidnapping.

376

Rape.

377

Unnatural offence.

XVII

379 to 382

Thefts of all kinds.

384, 386 to 389

Extortion of all Kinds, except section 385.

392 to 394, 397 & 398

Robbery of all Kinds.

395, 396, 399, 402

Dakaiti of all Kinds.

400 & 401

Belonging to a gang on thieves or dacoits.

404

Dishonest misappropriation of property belonging to a deceased person.

406 to 408

Criminal breach of trust by Public servant.

411 to 414

Receiving stolen property.

418 to 420

Cheating of all Kinds, except simple cheating, section 417.

429 to 433 and 435 to 440

Serious mischief.

449 to 452

House-trespass in order to commit an offence.

454 to 458

Lurking house-trespass or house-breaking other than simple, section 453.

459 & 460

Grievious Hurt or death caused in house breaking.

461

Dishonesty breaking open a closed receptacle.

462

Fraudulently opening a closed receptacle held in trust.

464 to 469

Forgery.

XVIII

489A to 489D

Forgery of currency notes and bank notes.

II (Code of Criminal Procedure).

Chapter VIII Section 108, 109 and 110 Bad livelihood.

III (Miscellaneous Acts)

Gambling Ordinance, Opium Act, Indian Arms Act (54 of 1959).

IV (Other Offences)

All offences, in cases in which the subsequent proof of the conviction so recorded would render the person convicted liable by law to enhanced punishment on subsequent conviction of the same or similar offence by reason of the proof of such former conviction, and all offences in which upon, such proof, the law establishes a presumption in favour of the prosecution.
Illustration

(a) Offences under section 66 of Rajasthan Excise Act shall be so entered because an enhanced punishment is provided for subsequent conviction.

(b) Offences under section 112 of Motor Vehicle Act.

(c) Offences under section 31 of Arms Act etc.

8.23. Entries in conviction register when made. – The entries shall be made –
(a) If there is no appeal, immediately.

(b) if an appeal is made and the conviction is upheld, when the result of the appeal in known.

(c) if an appeal lies but is not made, when limitation has expired.

8.24. Entries of conviction how and when made. – (1) Entries of convictions shall ordinarily be made from charge sheet slip.
(2) When the entry has been made in the General Crime Register the charge sheet slip shall be sent to the police station.
(3) When charge sheet slips are kept pending for results of appeals to be known they shall be kept in pigeon holes by the official in charge of the General Crime Register and separate intimation of the results of the case in the lower courts shall be sent to the police station.
8.25. Despatch Register of charge sheets and conviction slips. – (1) A Despatch Register of charge sheets and conviction slip referring to cases included under rule 8.22 shall be maintained in Form 8.25 (1) by the official in charge of the General Crime Register.
Separate pages shall be allotted for each police station in the district and for conviction slips received from magistrates of other districts.
(2) After the necessary entries have been made in the First Information Report Register and Conviction Register, charge sheet slips and conviction slips shall be kept in separate record in the police station which shall not be destroyed.
8.26. Despatch of conviction slips in other cases. – (1) If the charge sheet slip refer to the conviction of a person for an offence included under rule 3.22 of a person who is a resident of a police station other than that from which the case was sent for trial, the official incharge of the General Crime Register shall send a conviction slip in Form 8.26 in addition to sending the charge sheet slip to that police station of which such person is a resident.
If such police station is in another district the conviction slip shall be sent through the Superintendent.
(2) If there is any doubt as to the residence of a convict, or if a convict is unidentified or belongs to foreign territory, the conviction shall be recorded in the police station from which the case was sent for trial. In such a case a notice be sent for publication in the Criminal Intelligence Gazette.
8.27. Intimation of conviction from courts. – Convictions in case included under 8.22 which dealt by magistrates direct, shall be entered in the Conviction Register on receipt of intimation from magistrates.
8.28. Publication of conviction of foreigners etc in Criminal intelligence Gazette. – Conviction, obtained in the Rajasthan State of subject of any foreign State, shall in addition to the record prescribed in the above rules, be recorded in the like form together with the descriptive roll of the person convicted in the English and Hindi editions of the Criminal Intelligence Gazette.
8.29. General Crime Register. – A General Crime Register in Form 8.29 shall be maintained in Hindi in the office of the Circle officer.
(1) The particulars of every cognizable offence reported to the police shall be entered in such register.
(2) The Register shall be divided into groups of offences corresponding with Statement of the Annual Report. At the top of the first page allotted to each group shall be written, the heading of the group and pages shall be cut to display the heading.
(3) On the receipt of the counterfoil of the first information report the return writer shall enter in the register as many of the particulars required as may be possible, and shall endorse on such counterfoil the words “Entered contents in the General Crime Register” with the date and his signature.
As the investigation proceeds he shall enter from the case diaries any additional particulars necessary to complete the form, and shall similarly endorse such case diaries.
(4) If case sent up by the police is convicted under a section of law, other than that entered in the register a red line shall be drawn through the original entries and fresh entries made under the group which includes the offence of which the offender is actually convicted.
In one person is convicted of the offence originally entered and another person of a different offence, the original entry shall be corrected aria a fresh entry made of the separate conviction.
(5) Every erasure and alteration shall be made so that the original entry remains legible.
(6) Cases cancelled or transferred to other district shall be erased by a red line drawn through them and an entry made giving an abstract of the order of cancellation or transfer, with the date and the name of the officer who made it.
(7) At the close of each year the register for the year in question shall be totalled.
Each group of offences after deducting cases cancelled and transferred shall be totalled separately, these totals being required for the preparation of annual statistics of crime.
(8) Each annual volume shall be strongly bound and kept for ten years.
8.30. General Crime Register, Rules for maintenance of. – The following rules shall regulate the maintenance of the General Crime Register and the preparation of annual statistics of crime-
(i) Each separate offence shall be reckoned as a separate case, although several such offences may have been joined for the

purpose of the trial.
(ii) The question whether a set of facts constitutes one offence or more than one offence shall be determined with reference to section 235, Code of Criminal Procedure.

(iii) In prosecutions for bad livelihood and for nuisance under section 34 of the Police Act, a separate case shall ordinarily for each person arrested.

(iv) When a case sent for trail and a final order in passed, such case shall be entered under the section of the Act under which the accused person is convicted or acquitted. The final order is the order which stands after all appeals have been heard.

If such conviction or acquittal covers the facts reported by the police, the police returns shall if they differ be amended accordingly and the original report cancelled.
Illustration

(a) The police send up A for trig of murder, A is convicted of culpable homicide. The returns shall be corrected by an entry under culpable homicide and by cancelling the entry under murder.

(b) The police send up B for trial of murder B is convicted under section 318, Indian Penal Code. Here, if a murder was committed, as the conviction does not cover the facts of the police reports though it covers the evidence the police were able to produce, the entry of murder shall stand, and a new entry be made under section 318, Indian Penal Code.

(c) C is found in possession of suspicious property and is sent up for trial on a charge of theft. He is convicted under section 411, Indian Penal Code. The property corresponded with that stolen in a case reported. The theft may be cancelled and an entry made under section 411, Indian Penal Code, if the evidence leaves the presumption evenly balanced between theft and receiving; but if the evidence shows that C received the stolen property from the thief, the case of the theft shall and a new entry be made under. section 411, Indian Penal Code.

(v) Cases cancelled by the order of the District Magistrate shall be excluded from the police returns, but the arrest of any person in a case thus cancelled, together with the particulars required by the form shall be shown in the columns relating to persons.

(vi) A case shall be shown only in the returns of the district in which it was investigated, or if transferred to another district for trial, in the returns of such district.

(vii) A “Decided” case in a case which has been brought to trial. (vii) A “Discharged” person in one not brought to trial.

(ix) Bank notes, Bills and cheques payable to bearer shall, when their cash value has been effectually transferred from the person from whom they were stolen, or taken in an offence, be entered at their cash value.

Bonds, securities, cash books, ledgers and the like shall be entered only at the value of the component materials.
Property stolen or recovered shall be entered in the returns of the year in which the report is made irrespective of the true date of such loss or recovery.
No such loss or recovery shall be recorded in the returns of more than one year.
(x) When a summons case in dismissed or a compoundable case compounded, and person arrested in such case shall be shown as acquitted.

(xi) If an accused person is discharged and subsequently rearrested and convicted on the same facts, or if an accused person is acquitted and such acquittal is subsequently quashed and the person convicted on the same facts, only one arrest and one conviction shall be shown in the same returns.

(xii) When an accused person dies, commits suicide, or becomes of unsound mind after the commission of an offence, a note of the fact shall be made in the column of remarks of the return in question.

(xiii) Person shall be shown as acquitted or discharged, who die before the conclusion of the trial or who are discharged or acquitted in a cognizable offence, whether such offence has been cancelled or not, and whether they are convicted of a non-cognizable offence or not.

8.31. Records of First Information Reports and Case Diaries. – (1) Case diaries shall be filed, in order of dates with the first information report of the case in question.
(2) In the record room of each District and Circle Office there shall be an almirah containing three rows of pigeon-holes, each row containing as many pigeon-holes as there are police stations in the district of circle.
A set of three pigeon-holes shall be allotted to each Police Station.
(a) In the upper row shall be kept complete cases, in which the final report or charge sheet has been received and papers connected with cases which have previously been removed from the almirah.

(b) In the middle row shall be kept first information reports in pending cases and cases diaries which have been duly sorted and placed in order of dates.

(c) In the lower row shall be kept unsorted papers connected with pending cases.

(3) The files of the cases under investigation or pending shall be removed from the middle row and placed in the upper row as soon as final report has been received and filed.
The papers in the lower row shall, as far as possible, be sorted daily and placed with their respective first information reports in the middle row.
8.32. Monthly Shorting – (1) At the end of each month, or sooner if convenient, the cases in the upper row which are no longer pending investigation shall be sorted and divided into separate packets as follows:-
(a) All traced cases and untraced bailable cases including cancelled cases.

(b) Utraced non bailable cases, in which action under section 512, Code of Criminal Procedure has been not taken.

(c) Untraced bailable and non-bailable cases in which action under section 512, Code of Criminal Procedure has been taken.

Each packet shall be placed in the record room in the current year’s bundle of the Police Station concerned.
A list of all the First Information Reports contained therein shall be kept with each packet under (b) and (c).
In (a) packets, the cases shall be arranged in order of the serial numbers of the First Information Reports.
(2) At the end of the current year, the packets in the current year’s bundle shall be removed and placed in other bundles in accordance with sub-rule (3).
(3) In the record room four separate bundles of case files shall be kept for each police station as follows:-
One bundle for the current year’s case files which shall contain all the packets under (a), (b) and (c), in accordance with sub-rule (1).
On bundle for the previous year’s cases files containing only packets under (a).
One bundle for the files of all cases under (b) reported during the past five follows:
One bundle for the cases files of the last year’s but one, containing only packets under (a).
The bundles of each police station shall be tied up in cloth of a distinctive colour and each bundle shall be marked with the name of the police station and the year to with its contents belong, as follow:-
Current year

……. (a), (b) and (c) files.

Previous year

……. (a) files

Last year but one

……. (a) files

Previous five years

……. (b) files

(4) The files of cases coming under (c), of all police stations, shall, on removal from the current years bundle, be tried up together in one bundle in cloth of a distinctive colour.
The bundle shall be labelled “50 years bundle” and names of all the police station concerned shall be entered on the table.
Such annual bundles shall be kept together in a separate part of the record room.
(5) The packets of case files shall be disposed of as follows:
(i) Packets coming under (a) will be removed and destroyed after two years from the date of the decision of the case in the Trial Court provided that no appeal or revision in the case in pending in the Appellate Courts. Untraced bailable cases including cancelled cases will be removed and destroyed after two years from the date on which the Magistrate has passed orders about the case being kept as untraced or cancelled as the case may be.

(ii) Packets under (b) will be removed and destroyed after five years from the date of the order of the Magistrate for keeping the case as untraced.

(iii) Packets coming under (c) will be removed and destroyed after fifty years from the date of conclusion of proceedings under section 512, Criminal Procedure Code.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M.
M.O.B. No.

Name Index Card

Name……..Father’s/Husband’s name………….Full particulars of residence……….Date of birth or approximate year of birth…….Height…………. History sheet classification…………..Reference to M.O. Register…………….
From No. 2.29

R.P.M. 2
M.O.B. No.

Alias Index Card

Alias……………………Name with Father’s/Husband’s name Classification of History Sheet………..Reference to M.O.Register.

From No. 2.29

R.P.M.
M.O.B. No.

M.O. Index Card

Modus operandi …………. Name with father’s/husband’s name……….. Alias ………… complete particulars of residence……………… Classification of history sheet.
From No. 2.29

History Sheet Classification

History Sheet
No. …………..

I. Name, Sarname with aliases, if any……………….
II. Father’s/Husband’s name with aliases, if any…………………
III. (a) Caste of Tribe (b) Trade or Profession……………..
IV. Residence (Village, Police Station & District)…………….
V. Whether identified, if so by whom…………….
VI. District Serial Number with date………………….
VII. Names of Identifying Officers with designation……………
WI. Photo, if any……………
Negative No.
Date on which photographed.

IX Descriptive Roll

Description. Delete what is not applicable. If noting extreme under the hand, delete all sub-heads (Underline any distinctive point).
Age on……….or………..Date of birth…………..
Height………….Feet……………..Inches.
Built……..thin……slout……..Erect……….Stooping………..
Hair……….Colour……….Bald………. cut…………
Eyebrows…………..Thick………….thin………..
Arched………Straight……….meeting
Forehead………….high………log upright……..Slopping………Board…………………Narrow.
Eyes………. Large………….. Small………….Wide-set ……………Close-set…………..Colour…………… of Iris………………………………….
Sight…………..Long…………Short…………..
Wears……..Glasses
Nose………….. Large……….. Small……..
hooked………. Snub………… Thick………. Thin……..
Mouth……..close………shut………shows…….teeth
Lips Thick…………..Thin Protruding . Hare lip Long or short upper.
Teeth……… Discoloured…….. Irregular…….. Missing in front
Fingers…….. Long ……Short…….. Stub……. Pointed ………………… Finger deformed.
Chin Receding Protruding……… Square………Pointed ………….. Long…………….Short……………………….
Ears ……………Large…….. Small……….Protruding………Long………..
Lobes……………………….Pierced.
Set……..Low….Set….. High………….
Face……… Long,……. Round ………Smiling ………
Scowling …………………………………..Wrinkled.
Complexion…….. Fair……….. Brown……. Black………Sallow………….
Beard Colour……… Long……….. Style………….
Moustaches Colour…….. Long………..Clipped urned up Drooping.
Any other descriptive points.
X. Modus Operandi.
(In coining cases, notes on process employed and analysis of the coin should be given by C.I.D.)

XI. (a) Usual Field of operation. (b) Places of habitual resort
XII. Previous history, also showing hereditary criminality –
XIII. Names of principal relatives with parentage and address
XIV. Names of associates and accomplices with parentage and address.
XV. Cases in which convicted or suspected-to be arranged chronologically with short history giving modus oprandi clearly, along with District and Police Station, case number, date and section and in convicted cases date of conviction, sentence, name of the Court convicting and section of law under which convicted-
Note: 2 Separate sub-columns should be provided for cases convicted and cases suspected)

XVI. Property (movable and immovable).
XVII. Current doing and checking by police officers, etc.

Form No. 2.22

R.P.M. 5

Descriptive, Deformity & Physical Peculiarities Cards

1. Special Features or Deformities.2. Name and Parentage/Husband’s name.3. Complete particulars of address.4. Complete particulars of address.5. History Sheet Classification.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 6

Property Card, Lost/Stolen (Identifiable)

1. Name of article (in English and Regional language).2. Marks of identity 3 Identification number, if any4. Owner’s name and address.5. Particulars of case, in which Stolen/Lost,6. Suspected Mode of disposal.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 6A

Property Card, Recovered (Identifiable)

1. Name of article (in English and Regional language).2. Marks of identity 3 Identification number, if any…….3. Owner’s name and address.4. Particulars of case in which Stolen/lost & Recovered.5. How recovered.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 7

Wanted Index Card (for absconders)

(i) Name and parentage/husband’s name.

(ii) Aliases.

(iii) Complete particulars of residence notice place.

(iv) Description including deformities/and peculiarities.

(v) Places likely to be visited by the absconders with reasons to do so.

(vi) Modus operandi, style, trade mark and transport used.

(vii) Complete particulars of the cases, in which absconding.

(viii) F.P. Classification, if any.

(ix) History sheet classification (if any).

(x) Photograph, if available.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 7A

Wanted Index Card (for abducted Persons)

(i) Name and parentage/husband’s name.

(ii) Aliases

(iii) Complete particulars of residence.

(iv) Description, including deformities, peculiarities and dress last worn.

(v) Places to which the abducted person is likeity to be taken/con. fined.

(vi) Particulars of the case in which abducted.

(vii) Photograph, if available.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 7B

Wanted Index Card (for missing persons.)

(i) Name and parentage/Husband’s name.

(ii) Aliases.

(iii) Complete particulars of residence.

(iv) Description, including deformities, peculiarities and dress last worn.

(v) Brief facts showing how found missing.

(vi) Likely places to which may be taken.

(vii) Circumstances in which found missing.

(viii) Photograph, if available.

Form – 2.29

Wanted Index Card

R.P.M. 7C

(for Dead Bodies)

(i) Detailed description of the dead body with marks of identification.

(ii) Place and circumstances in which found.

(iii) Details of marks of violence or injuries.

(iv) Result of postmortem examination.

(v) A copy of the photograph.

(vi) Result of report from Finger Print Bureau regarding finger print

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 8

Style Index Card

1. Style or profession alleged.2. Name and Parentage/husband’s name.3. Aliases ….4. Complete particulars of address.5. History Sheet Classification.

Note – “Style” indicates criminal’s alleged trade/profession at the time of, or immediately prior to commission of offence.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 9

Trade Mark Index Card

1. Trade mark.2. Name and Parentage/husband’s name3. Aliases…….4. Complete particulars of Residence.5. History sheet Classification No.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 10

Crime Report

Police Station
FIR No………. Dated

Under Section

(Show Beat number/Division number in case of Cities.)

1. Place of Offence.2. Name and address of complaint. Home Address.3. Time and date of occurrence.4. Name and address of accused with aliases and nick name.5. Brief facts of the case (including as many points as can be answered from the points below):

(a) Class of persons or property attached (i.e. women, child, money lender, dwelling house, shop, Mill, temple etc.)

(b) Actual point of entry (i.e. back or front door, gully, roof, wall etc.)

(c) Means employed (i.e. how property or person was approached, pipe climbing, bar bending, enticed by bogus message etc; how victim induced to part with property, forged cheque bogus employment etc. Kinds of tools used in effecting entry, Jemmy, duplicate key or other implements).

(d) Object offence (i.e. jewellery, cloth, money, cycles etc).

(e) Time, showing occasion (Prayer time, office hours, meal time etc.)

(f) “Style” (criminal’s alleged trade or profession at the time of or immediately prior to commission of offence).

(g) “Tale” (Criminal’s previous account to himself in locality).

(h) Associates or ‘Pal’ (number of persons engaged in the crime).

(i) “Transport” kind of conveyance used by criminals either for themselves or for conveying property.

(j) ‘Trade” Mark (Anything particular act done by criminals such as poisoning dogs, changing clothes, committing nuisance).

(k) Previous-(a) Convictions, (b) Suspicions.

(l) Relations.

(m) Associates.

(n) Property of the accused persons.

(o) Area of operation.

(p) Description and value of stolen property and remarks regarding recovery, if any –

(1) Identifiable(2) Unidentifiable…………..Investigating Officer; Police Station……………

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 11

Final Report

(Optional at State and District Level)

Police Station…………..Case F.I.R. No.

of under/section.

Complainant.

(a) Case classified true of false.

(b) No further clue for detection of the case could be obtained. The case was, therefore, classified as true but undetected.

(c) The following further clue was obtained regarding accused and property (but as the accused could not be traced, the case was classified as true but undetected). –

(Strike off if case is detected).

1. Property stolen Rs………2. Persons wanted or arrested and on what information (description, relations, etc.) to be given in criminal History sheet.3. Details of part played by each accused in commission of the crime or in disposing of stolen property and on what information and from where property was recovered and which property.4. Result of action taken against each accused. (If sent up to court, give court case No. also).5. If any of the accused was concerned in any other cases, P.S. Case No. and section of offence and total sentence of each accused.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 12

FromStation House Officer,P.S……………….District…………..ToThe Manager,M.O.B. Rajasthan,Jaipur.Subject : M.O.B……….. S/o…………..Caste…………….R/o…………PS………….District……..was arrested on…………at A.M.P.M.in case F.I.R. No…….Dated……………… Under/section…………………. P.S……… He is being sent for verification in the M.O.B.

Station House Officer,
P.S. …………………..

Form No. 2.29

Descriptive Roll

R.P.M. 13

F.I.R. No……..dated……. Section of Law ……………..P.S. District………1. Name, aliases and parentage/husband’s name of the accused.2. Caste3. Occupation.4. Native place5. Present residence.Description-(Delete what is not applicable, underline every distinctive point).Age………………………………….(Year of birth).Height…………. feet………..Inches.Built. Thin, Stout, Erect, Stooping, Medium, Strong.Complexion. Fair, What, Brown, Black, Sallow.Face, Long, Round, Square, Smiling, Scowling, Wrinkled.Hair, Colour, Bald, Cut, Curly, Straight.Eye Brows, Thick, Thin, Arched, Straight, Meeting, Bushy.Fore head, High, Low, Upright, Slopping, Bulging, Broad, Narrow, Wrinkled.Eyes, Large, Small, Wide set, Close set Blind eyes, Sqoiny eye, Cat’s eye, Catract eye.Colour. of Iris Black, Brown, Blue, Green.Sight, Long, Short, Wears Glasses.Nose, Lage, Small, Hooked, Snub, Straight, Thick, Thin.Mouth. Close shut, shows teeth, Large Small.Lips. Thick. Thin, Protruding, Hair-lips, Long or short Upper.Teeth. Small, Lage, Protruding, False gold, Tudded or covered with gold, ………………… Missing in front……………Discol, oured……………..irregularlyFalse teeth…………..Gold teeth……….Gold points.Fingers, Long, Short, Stub, Pointed Fingers deformedChin, Receding, Protruding, Square, Ball, Pointed, Long, Short, Double, Dimpled Biloted.Jaw. Square, Narrow,Ear. Large, Small, Protruding, Ling’s Pierced, Set low/Set high.Beard, Colour………….Long………Style…………Moustaches, Colour Long………….Clipped Turned up. Dropling Marks on forearm…… Marks on face……….. Marks on hands………..Marks on neck……………Marks on chest or stomach………….Marks on back…………Marks on feet…………….other peculiarities ……….. Peculiarities of manner………Appearance. Up-right, Slovenly,Walks fast or Slowly, Talks fast, slow, Loud, Soft/harsh Voice.

Deformity if any in Speech

Dress.
Literacy.Accomplishments. Habits, Drinks, Drugs, Prostitutes, Gambling, Smoking, etc.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 14
of 199…..
M.O.B. No

FromManager,Modus Operandi Bureau,C.I.D., Rajasthan, JaipurToThe Officer Incharge,Finger Print Bureau,………………Memo,The following person has been given M.O.B. No……..This number may please be entered on the top of the original F.I. Slip with a remark ‘Every subsequent arrest should be reported to the Manager M.O.B., Rajasthan, Jaipur and his F.P. Classification furnished to this Bureau-Name

Police Station

F.P.B. Troce Memo
No. & Date

Manager,
Modus Operandi Bureau,

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 15

The Officer Incharge,Photographic Section,C.I.D., Rajasthan, Jaipur.Please take the photo of-NameM.O.B. No.Identification MarksNo. of copies

Manager,
M.O.B., Rajasthan,
Jaipur.
Photo taken on Photographer

Checked Manager, M.O.B.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 16

Jail Release Register

(For District Level Only)

S.No.

Particulars (FIR No., Section of Law, date and PS) Law, of the case.

Name and complete Particulars of offender.

Particulars of Convictions.

History Sheet Classification.

Date of Release from Jail.

Where prisoner is likely to go after release.

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 17

M.O.B. No. of

Photograph Sheet

Year of birth ……………. Height ………….. Feet …………….. inches …………….. Profile …………….. Full Face.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 18

Case Index Card

1. Head.2. Sub-Head.3. Complete particulars of the case.4. Brief facts showing method.5. Particulars of the culprit/suspect including description, if known.6. List of identifiable property stolen/recovered.

Note

1. Cards should be maintained in respect of Detected cases also.

2. An undetected case on being detected should be underlined in red ink.

Form No. 2.29

R.P.M. 19

Transport Index Card

1. Transport 2. Name
3. Alises 4. Parentage/Husband’s name
5. Complete Particulars 6. History Sheet Classification

Form No. 2.29

M.O.B. Register

R.P.M. 20

S.No.

History Sheet classification No.

Particulars of the offender (Name, parentage/Husband’s name, village, P.S. and Distt.)

Particulars (F.I.R No. Section of law dated and P.S. of the case.)

Facts of the case.

M.O., adopted (Detailed)

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Appendix No. 2.29

Instructions Concerning the Examination of Scenes of Thefts Burglaries and Particulars Required to be submitted in the Cases of all such Offences to the Central Investigating Agency.

The scenes of all offences under Chapter 17. Indian Penal Code, shall be most carefully examined, as soon as possible, by the investigating officer who, in cases of theft (except cattle theft) and burglary, shall attach a separate site inspection report with the first case diary irrespective of the fact whether the accused are known, unknown arrested or at large. This site inspection report on arrival at head quarter shall be passed on without delay to the District Investigating Agency.In the case of offence against, property, other than theft and burglary, no site inspection report need be prepared unless the scene of the offence presents such peculiarities as make such a report desirable or unless a report is called for by officers in charge of the District Investigating Agency.The object of a site inspection report is (a) to enable other officers who have not been to the spot to visualise the scene (b) to permit of an intelligent study of the ways and methods of the particulars criminal by the District Investigating Agency (c) to enable the Central Investigating Agency from their records of individual criminals to suggest identity of the accused responsible for the particular case under investigation. Obviously, therefore, every site inspection report must be intelligently and carefully complied after a deliberate study of the scene. A list of points that should find mention in site inspection reports is given below, but the list is by no means exhaustive and is intended merely as a guide.

A – Burglaries of All Kinds.

1. Number of the First Information Report; date section of the offence; police station and district.2. Time and date of (a) occurrence, (b) report to the police.3. Special circumstances, if any, concerning the time and date of occurrence (e.g. fair, festival or evening meals, etc.)4. Place of occurrence, with distance and direction from (a) police station (b) railway station and (c) main road.5. Nature of locality (i.e. dwelling house, office, mosque, shop, etc.) and its relation to the rest of the village or town.6. Name, address, profession and status of the complainant.7. Class of property attached.8. Class of property removed.9. Number of rooms entered by the accused and whether or not they were occupied at the time.10. Whether or not property was removed from the particular room to which the accused first gained admittance.11. Any clue left to indicate whether the accused worked in the dark or by means of light.12. Particulars of any belongings of the accused left by him on the spot.13. Any boxes, safes, almirahs, etc., containing articles of value over-looked by the accused and not touched by him and if so their locality.14. Precautions, if any, adopted by the accused during the commission of the offence to guard against surprise (such as chaining of door, etc.)15. When property removed was last seen at the place from which it was stolen.16. Finger-prints – Description of traces of finger-prints found, their exact position and steps taken for their preservation, development, photograph, transfer, identification, etc.17. Foot-prints – (1) Number of foot-prints found, (a) leading to the spot (b) on the spot, (c) leading from the spot and deduction therefrom as in the number of culprits involved (2) Direction from which the accused came and direction in which they went, (3) Distance to which tracks leading (a) to and (b) from the scene where followed,(4) Measurement (in inches) of individual foot-prints, (5) Precautions, if any adopted by the accused to conceal their foot-prints, (6) Whether moulds, etc., taken or not, in latter case, reason for failure to do so.18. Opinion as to whether accused were expert or amateurs and class of society to which they belonged and reason in support thereof.19. Means of transport, if any, employed by the accused for the removal of property.20. Any other clues or matters of importance requiring mention.

If admittance to the house obtained by means of a hole in the wall

21. Condition of the wall (kachcha, pacca, burnt bricks, stone, etc.)22. The exact situation of the hole and its relative position with regard to doors, windows, ventilators, etc.23. Shape of the hole (illustrate by diagram).24. Height of the base of the hole from the ground (a) outside and (b) inside.25. Exact measurements (in inches and not in angles or other such unauthorised measurements) of the hole (a) outside and (b) inside.26. Thickness of the wall where hole made.27. Side to which excavated earth was thrown.28. Details of marks left by instrument used and inference drawn therefrom as to the nature Of the instrument.29. Whether room in which the hole was made was occupied or not at the time.

It admittance was obtained by lock breaking or lock opening

30. Type of lock broken.31. If opened by key an indication as to whether key used was (a) the original one and if so, how accused obtained possession of it, (b) duplicate, (c) skeleton or false.32. If lock forced (a) give particulars of marks on it and inference drawn therefrom as to the instrument used, and (b) state if lock is still in working order.33. If lock intact and hasp or chain wrenched out, state the type of instrument that appears to have been used.

If admittance obtained by means of a hole in roof

34. The construction of the roof (whether kachcha, pacca, thatched,etc.,35. Any indication as to how the accused ascended the roof.36. Position of the hole (whether adjoining beam, in one corner etc.,37. Whether room beneath was occupied or not.38. Whether property was removed from the room in which hole was made.39. Means employed by the accused to descend into the room below.40. How earth removed was disposed of & precautions adopted by the accused to prevent earth from falling into the room below.41. Any other matters of importance requiring special mention.

If admittance obtained by any way other than those Mentioned above

42. How admittance was gained.43. If admittance gained by closed windows or ventilators, give particulars to indicate how bars were forced or glasses broken and means adopted by accused for preventing noise.44. If culprit scaled the wall (a) state means employed (i.e., rope, leather, bamboo, water pipe, etc.) (b) give particulars of marks, if any, left on the wall.45. If admittance gained through a drain give dimensions and position with respect to the rest of the house.46. If admittance gained through chimney give similar particulars.47. In case of admittance obtained by deceitful means threat, force etc., give details of story told by suspect.

In The Case of Day Light Burglaries

48. State Whereabouts of the owner at the time of the commission of offence.49. Precautions if any, taken by the accused or his associates to divert the attention of neighbours away from the house attacked.

B. Theft of all kinds

The same particulars as for burglaries, where applicable together with a brief report of the fact.

In case of Pick-Pocketing

1. Means employed by culprit (i.e. razor, blade, knife etc.)2. The position of the picked pocket (waist-cost, inner pocket of coat, etc. and its contents)3. Position of other pockets and contents which were not touched.4. Reasons, if any for believing that the accused had associates.5. Means adopted to distract the attention of the victim.

Form No. 2.6 (iv)

Police Station…………. District………….

Comparative statement of Reported Crime during the Month of and From the 1st January 199………..to The End of ……… 199

(To be attached to Superintendent’s first weekly diary in each month.)

S.No.

District of Police Station

Period

Murders

Dacoities Burglaries

All reported crime Exclusive of security cases

Plus or minus.

Number of persons on security under section 110, C.P.C.

Number of cases Pending in court. for every one moth exclusive of security cases

Percentage column 14 bears to total Police cases reported during past month

‘A’ or ‘B’

199

199

199

199

199

199

199

199

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

A – The figures for the past month.B – The figures for the year up to date, to be written in red ink.Dated the ………… Superintendent or Deputy Inspector. General

Form No. 2.15 (2)

Police Station…………. District…………….

Report of a fair held at……………District(1) Local name of Fair or assembly…………………………….(2) Object of fair or assembly……………………………..(3) Average daily attendance………………………………(4) Number of days the fair lasts………………………………(5) Noteworthy particulars -(6) Remarks by District Magistrate and Deputy Inspector General to follow :Dated the………. 199….

Countersigned
Superintendent

Magistrate of the District

Form No. 2.17 (4)

Police Station…….. District…………….Licence No. ………..Free of all fee ‘Whereas……. have applied for a licence under section 30 of Police Act (Act V of 1861), the following licence is granted.Licence for……….. on the occasion of…….at……..on………under section 30 of Police Act, (Act V of 1861)

Names & description of the sees

Period for which the licence is valid

Place or area for which the licence is granted

Place and time of commencement

Place and time of conclusion

Route to be followed (to be given in detail)

Places and periods of halts, if any.

kind of music allowed and the places (if any), where it would not be played

Officer in charge of the Procession

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

If there are more licencees, their names, should be entered.In the remarks column shall be entered all particulars which it is necessary to prescribe, but for which a special column is not provided, e.g. height of Tazias in Moharram procession.Dated the……..199.Seal.

Superintendent of Police

1. The licence is granted subject to all the provisions of the police Act (No. V of 1861) and subject to strict observance of all terms and conditions of the licence.2. The licencees and the processionist generally, shall comply with any orders issued by the Magistrate or other Officer-in-charge of the Procession with regard to-

(a) the speed of the procession;

(b) and changes of route decided on by the Magistrate or the Officer incharge of the procession; and

(c) and orders deemed necessary such as stopping of music, speeches or songs, etc., at specified places

3. The licence shall be promptly shown or surrendered on demand by the Magistrate or Police Officer of and above the rank of Officer-i¬n-charge of the Police Station.4. It shall be subject to cancellation by the Officer who granted it.5. The licences severally and individually shall be present throughout and shall be responsible for rendering all assistance in their power to the Police in maintaining order at the place of the meeting or on the route of the procession and for compliance by the members of the meeting or procession with all the conditions of the licence or any orders issued in accordance with these condition. This responsibility rests upon the licences whether they happen to be present or not at any particular time or place during the course of the procession.6. Special conditions (if any). Certificate of receipt from licences.I/We the undersigned have received this licence and undertake to abide by the conditions therein inserted.

Signature.

Form No. 3.30

Police Station ……………..

District

No. 1
Received from
……………………….
The sum of Rupees
……………………
on account of
……………………….
Dated ………………
The …………………..
Chap.

No. 1
Received from
……………………….
The sum of Rupees
……………………
on account of
……………………….

19 ………..

RP. Form No. 3.30

Charge for maintenance of Animals

Police Station …………..
F.I.R. No.

District,
Date ………..

Number of animals

Kind of animals

Rate per day

Number of days

Total

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

Grand Total

The above charge are due to Complainant/surety.
1. Buffalo 2. Bullock or cow.
2. Horse. 4. Pony.
5. Camel 6. Donkey.
7. Sheep or goat.

R.P. Form No. 3.38 (1)

Register No. 2 The Station Daily Diary

Police Station ………

District

The following, officer were present at morning Roll CallSub-Inspectors………Assistant Sub-Inspectors……….. head constables Constables…….. mounted head constables……… mounted constables. The remaining staff were…….on duty …………. sick. The Station is…………. under sanctioned strength Remarks……..over

Diary of the above station commencing at o’clock on the…………. and ending…….. o’clock on the

Serial No.

Name of reporter

Substance of report

1

2

3

Signature of Officer Incharge of Police station.

R.P. Form No. 3.44 (a) Part I

District

Police Station
Register No. 4

Part-I Absconders In Cases Registered in the Home Police Station

(Residents of the home police station to be written in red ink)

S. No.

Name, parentage, caste and description of absconders

Residence, i.e., village, police station and district

Offence, F.I.R. No. and date, places and date of offence

Reward offered

Clues to probable where abouts.

Action taken to procure arrest, details to be given as to-

Singature of Gazetted Officer

Date of arrest, death cancellation or removal from proclaimed offender’s list.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

(a) Police Station of the home district to which notices sent.

(b) Police Station of other district to which notices sent.

(c) Date on which notices sent for publication in “CI. Gazette”.

(d) If a P.R. convict, date of intimation to F.P. Bureau.

(e) Action taken under sections 512/87/88, Code of Criminal Procedure with dates.

(f) Details of any other action taken, with dates and name of court.

(g) Has History Sheet been opened in home district and name entered in Register No. XI.

R.P. Form No. 3.44 (b) Part II

Police Station …………………….

District

Register No. 4-Part II-Absconders in cases registered in other police station, but residents of, or likely to visit, this police station

(Residents of home police station to be written in red ink)

Serial No.

Police station or district submitting notice Name of absconder

Parentage, caste and description

Residence, i.e., village, police station and district

Offence, FIR No. and date, place and date of offence

Reward offered

Clues to probable where-abouts.

Action Taken to procure arrest, details to be given as to-
(a) Action taken under Section 512, 87/88, Code of Criminal Procedure with date.
(b) Details of any other action taken with dates and name of Court.

Signature of gazetted officer

Date of arrest, death, cancellation or removal to proclaimed offender’s list.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

R.P. Form No. 3.45

Register No. 5-Register of Correspondence

Police Station …………………….

District……………..

No.

Date of order, etc.

By whom issued

Substance of order or letter received

No.

Date pf report

Substance of report or letter despatched.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

R.P. Form No. 3.46 (1)

Police Station…………………….

District…………….

Character Rolls of Government Servants or Applicants P.S. Registration No. 6 For Government Employee Verified By the Police

Annual Serial No.

Date of receipt of roll

From whom received

Where employed or service for which applying, i.e. Railway, police. Military, etc.

Name and parentage of applicant

Village of which resident

How, when and by whom character tested and results of enquiries

Date of return of roll

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R.P. Form No. 3.47 (1) Part I

Register No. 7 Part I

Village Crime Note-Book of VillagePolice Station……………….

District………………

Part I

Population by census of Male/FemaleNo of housesName of outlying hamlets with number of houses in eachRevenue.Market days, fairs and festivals.Principal castes and tribes and population of each.

Head man

Other leading men

Village watchman

Sarpanchas and panchas

Members of the villages Defence Parties

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

R.P. Form No. 3.47 (1) Part II

Village Crime Register Part II

Police Station………………..

District…………………

Register No. 7

Serial No. Date of F.I.R.

Place of occurrence
1. Village
2. P.S.
3. District
4. State

Section of Law

Particulars of informant

Particulars of the accused or suspect

1

2

3

4

5

Class of property

Places where

Particulars of helpers of accused/suspects.

Stolen

Recovered

Stolen property recovered

Criminal where arrested

Helpers Receivers

Those who furnished bail

6

7

8

9

10

H.Q. Modus Operandi

Result of case against each accused

Remarks

11

12

13

R.P. Form No. 3.47 (1) Part III

Police Station……………..

District………………

Register No. 7

Part III

Cases traced to the village

S. No.

Police Station village and district. Number of First Information Report with date

Section of Law, nature of offence and class of property attached

Name parentage & caste of accused

Name, parentage, caste and address of all criminals implicated in the case, whether convicted, aquitted or suspected of committing the offence, and of harbourers, receivers of other helpers of the accused.

Result of the case against each man mentioned in column 5.

1

2

3

4

5

6

R.P. Form No. 3.47 (1) Part IV

Register No. 7-Part III A Visits to the Village

Police Station……………….

District………..

S. No.

Name, parentage, caste & relationship, if any of person visited

Name parentage, caste & address of visitor

Brief reasons for suspecting visitor

Objects & dates of visits

Number & date of bad character roll received or information sheet despatched

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Note-This form shall be maintained-(1) for the visit to village (b) history sheeters in bundle (a) and (b) persons established through information sheets (Strangers roll) to be of doubtful character; and(2) for persons arrested in villages under Sections 55/109, Criminal Procedure Code, provided that they are placed on security. In the case of persons, in clause (2) the names, their sureties and the reason for standing surety should be entered in the ‘Remarks’ column.

Chap.

R.P. Form No. 3.47 (1) Part V

Register No. 7

Part V

Police Station……………….

District………..

Notes on crime in the village with special reference to factions, land or water disputes, presence of criminal tribes or gangs, occurrence of obstructions on or damage to railway line within the village, special outbreaks of crime in the village, etc., in accordance with rule.

R.P. Form No. 3.47 (1) Part VI

Register No. 7-Part

Police Station……………….

District………..

Name of Town or Village

Part V

Names of residents who have been convicted of certain offence

S. No.

Name of convicted persons and age on date stated in column 5

Parentage, Caste and Occupation with description; Particular marks and P.R. No. if any

Section and Act under which convicted and nature of the offence

Name of Court, district, Sentence and date of conviction

Date release

Whether entered in Book X (Surveillance Register) with No. of History Sheeter, if any.

Signature of Police officer making the entry and date of making it.

Place of crime if committed outside the village.

Remarks (Names, parentage, caste and address of convicts and co-suspects, places where arrested & property recovered and residence of persons who stood bails)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

R.P. Form No. 3.54 Part I

Police Station Register No. 16 Part I

Police Station……………….

District………..

List of Village Watchmen

S. No. of village according to the Register No. 7

Name of village

Distance and direction from Police Station

No. of watchmen sanctioned

Name, parentage and caste of watchman

Residence

Date of appointment

Age when appointed

Rate of pay

Population of village

Number of houses

Day of week fixed for attendance at Police Station (vide Rule 3.54 Police Rule)

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

R.P. Form No. 3.54 Part II

Police Station Register No. 16 Part II

Police Station……………….

District………..

List of Police Officers attached to the Police Station

(Officers head-constables and constables to be shown on separate pages)

Serial No.

Constabulary No.

Name

Residence, Village District Police Station

Date of enlistment

Date of Posting to Police Station

Date of being sent to head-quarters for training

Literate or lliterate

For the 1sttime For the 2ndtime For the 3rdtime

Date of Transfer

Where transferred to

Reason of transfer

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Form No. 3.54 Part III

Register No. 16 Part III

Police Station……………….

District………..

Miscellaneous Store Register of the………. of ………………. District

Date

Nature of transactions

Description of stores

Remarks

a

b

c

d

etc.

1

2

3

4

Opening balance
By purchase
Balance
By purchase
Unserviceable and sold

Balance

Sale price Credited on
Balance 31.3.19

(To the ruled on ordinary Folio Size Paper)

Verified

R.P. Form No. 3.59 (1) Part (1)

Police Station……………….

District………..

Register No. 17 Part I (1)-Register of Licences to manufacture, convert, sell or keep for sale Arms, Ammunition or Military Stores.

Tehsil

Number

Name of licensee

Father’s name, caste and residence

Place of business

Date

Inspection by

Assistant or Dy. Superintendent or Inspector of Police

By Magistrate of District or Superintendent of Police

Remarks

1st

2nd

3rd

4 th

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part I (2)

Register No. 17-Part I (2) Register of Licences to keep and sale, convert, sell or keep for sale Arms, Ammunition of Military Stores.

Police Station……………….

District………..

Tehsil

Number

Name of licensee

Father’s name, caste and residence

Place of business

Date

Inspection by

Assistant or Dy. Superintendent or Inspector of Police

By Magistrate of District or Superintendent of Police

Remarks

1st

2nd

3rd

4 th

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part I (3)

Register No. 17 Part I (3) Register of Licences to possess Arms, Ammunition or Military Stores

Police Station……………….

District………..

Tehsil

Number

Date

Name of licence holder

Father’s name, caste, etc.

Residence

Number & description of weapons

Place where arms are to be kept

Terms for which licence

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part I (4)

Register No. 17-Part I (4)-Register of Licence to possess Arms and Ammunition, and to go armed for the purposes of Sport, Protection or Display.

(A separate part of Register to be reserved for each description of weapons, i.e. Short Gun, Rifles, Revolvers, Swords, etc.) The register to be permanent.

Police Station……………….

District………..

Serial No.

Tehsil

Number and description of weapon

Name of licence. Holder

Father’s name, caste etc.

Residence

No. and date of licence

Period for which licence is available

Date of renewal of licence

Remarks Action taken when licence expires, loss of weapon licensed, sale, etc.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part I (5)

Register No. 17 Part I (5)

Register of Licences granted to possess arms and ammunition and to go armed for the purpose of destroying wild animals which do injury to Human beings, Cattle or Crops in……………. District.

Tehsil

Form & No.

Date

Name of licence holder

Father’s name and caste.

Residence

Place for which licence is valid

Weapon

Date of expire of licence

Inspection by Magistrate of Weapon and Licence

Remarks

1styear

2ndyear

3rdyear

4thyear

5th year

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part II

Police Station……………….

District………..

Register No. 17 Part II

Register of licences granted under Excise and Opium Acts for vend in the Police Station.

S. No.

No. of licence

Name and address of licence holder

Locality of shop

Articles which the licencsee is authorised to stock and sell

Whether licensed to sell wholesale or by retail

Amount of licence fee for the year

Period within which Licence is valid

Remarks

From

To

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part III

Police Station……………….

District………..

Register No. 17 Part III

Register of licenses to manufacture, possess and sell explosive in the District/Police Station

S. No.

Name, Parentage and place of residence of licence

Place of business factory or shop

Maximum quantity of explosives to be possessed at any one time

Description and quantity of explosive to be manufactured during the year

Description and quantity of explosives to be possessed and sold during the year

Period for which Licence is valid

Date of inspection made by police officers of and above the rank of Sub-Inspector.

Remarks

From

To

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part IV

Police Station……………….

District………..

Register No. 17 Part IV

Register of licences to possess petroleum under the Petroleum Act.

No. of licence

Object of licence

Name and address of licence.

Description and quantity of petroleum to be possessed

Place and full details of storage shed

Period for which Licence is valid

Inspection

Remarks

From

To

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

R.P. Form No. 3.55 Part V

Police Station……………….

District………..

Register No. 17 Part V

Register of licences under the Poisons Act.

No of licence

Name and address licensee

Place of business

Description of poison to be possessed

Period for which licence is valid

Inspection

Remarks

From

To

Date by Whom

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

R.P. Form No. 3.56

Police Station……………….

District………..

Police Register No. XVIII

Receipts for arms, ammunition or military stores deposited in the above Police Station under the Indian Arms Act, XE of 1878

Date…………

Serial No.Nature of Arms, ammunition orMilitary stores and condition in which received.Name, father’s name and address of depositor.I certify that I have received the above mentioned articles and have deposited them in the station store room after labelling them. The articles will be forwarded to headquarters if the owner has not obtained a licence to possess them within seven days from date.

Signature
Station Clerk.

R.P. Form No. 3.57

Police Station……………….

District………..

Register No. 19 Store Room Register

1. Column No. 1 Serial No.2. No. of first information report (if any), from whom (if taken from a person) and from what place3. Date of deposit and name of depositor.4. Description of property.5. Reference to report asking for order regarding disposal of property.6. How disposed of and date.7. Signature of receptent (including person by whom dispatched.)8. Remarks.

(To be prepared on a quarter sheet of native paper).

R.P. Form No. 3.56 (1)(a)

Police Station……………….

District………..

Descriptive Rolls of unidentified persons found dead

Annual serial No.

District

Name, parentage and residence of informant

Date on which found

Place where found

Description

Details of Property found

Circumstances under which found and particulars likely to afford a clue to the identity of the deceased

Remarks

Village

Police station

Sex
Apparent

Height

Complexion

Particular marks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Date…………..
The…………….

Standard From
Superintendent of Police

R.P. Form No. 3.66 (1)(b)

Police Station……………….

District………..

List of Persons Lost or Missing

Annual Serial No.

District

Name of informant and his relation to the person missing

Name of police station & village of person missing

Parentage

Caste

Residence

Date of disappearance

Place rom which missing

Description

Circumstances of disappearance

Details of property which the missing person took with him or which was worn by him when last seen

Remark

Village
Railway Station
District

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Date ………
The………..

Superintendent of Police

R.P. Form No. 3.66 (1) (c)

Police Station……………….

District………..

List of Unclaimed Property/Cattle

Annual Serial No.

District.

Name, parentage and residence of person from whom recovered or by whom deposited

Place of Recovery

Date of recovery.

Circumstances under which recovery and particulars likely to afford clue to the owner

List of article/Cattle with full description and value

Remarks

Village

Police Station

5

6

7

8

1

2

3

4

Date ………
The………..

Superintendent of Police

R.P. Form No. 3.66 (1) (d)

Police Station……………….

District………..

List of Property Lost or Stolen Cattle Strayed

Annual Serial No.

District

Name of police Station and No. and date of first information report if any, with description

Date of loss or theft

Name, parentage and residence and residence of complainant/owner

Description and value of property lost/cattle strayed or stolen

Brief particulars of the case and circumstances likely in any way to afford clue of the property/cattle or the theft

Reward offered

1

2

4

4

5

6

7

8

(Standard Form)

Dated ………
The ………..

Superintendent of Police

From No.3.58(a)

Police Station Register No. XX part (I)

Police Station……………….

District………..

Cash Account of monies such as Pay, Allowances and miscellaneous, transactions, etc. of Police Station

[See Rule 3.55……]

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Annual/Serial No.

Date

Name of receipt or expenditure

Receipt

Expenditure

Balance

Reference to previous subsequent or final numbers in this register regarding the same translation

Reference To

Detail of Balance to be Give Daily Reference to the serial No. of this Register on which the amount composing was originally entered

Description of money

(a)
Receipt book No. (Rule 3.60)

(b)
Road Certificate No. (Rule 3.59…..)

(c)
No. of entry in which details are given

219

1-6-26

(For the month of June, 1926)
Balance from last month

Rs. 25

Rs. 25

215

Reward due to Dharam Singh of village

220

4-6-26

Pay for may 1926

405

430

221
224
225

50

215

(1) Reward due to Dharam Singh

221

4-6-26

To pay of sub-Inspector, H.Cs, and F.Cs…

352

78

220

220

(2) Py of F.Cs.

53

Total

78

222

4-6-26

Pay of menials for May, 1926

44

122

227

51

..

215

(1) Reward to due to Dharam Singh

25

223

5-6-26

Traveling Allowances of Establishment (Bill No. 15)

220

322

226

.

52

222

(2) Pay of Menials

44

223

(3) Travelling Allowances of Establishment

20

Total

89

224

5-6-26

To S.I. Shahabad Pay of F.C. N. 25, Nanda transferred to that P.S.

17

305

220

.

70

225

5-6-26

To S.I. Pay of Foot Constabtes

..

36.

269

220

226

5-6-26

Disbursed Travelling Alownace of Establishment

..

180

89

223

..

227

10-6-26

Disbursed pay of menials for May. 1926

..

44

45

222

.

228

10-6-26

To Dharam Singh Zalidar

25

20

215

.

223

Travelling Allowance of Establishment

20

229

25-6-26

Estate of deceased F.C. No. 35, Abdulla of Ambala District, due to his widow of village

50

70

53

..

223

(1) Travelling Allowance of Esablishment.

20

(2) Estate

50

Total

70

Total for June, 1926

724

654

70

..

Notes :- (1) A line shall be drawn after each entry.

An undetected case on being detected should be underlined(2) the Serial No. in which the final transaction is completed should be entered in red ink opposite to the Serial No. in which the receipt of the amount was originally recorded. this red ink number will show that the amount in question has been finally adjusted.An undetected case on being detected should be underlined(3) When an item is pending final adjustment, the red ink number will not be given.

Form No… 3.58 (b)

Police Station……………….

District………..

Police Station Register No. XX, Part (2)

Permanent Advance Rs. 20

Cash Account of Permanent Advance of Police Station

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Annual/Serial No.

Date

Nature of receipt or expenditure

Receipt

Expenditure

Balance

Reference to previous subsequent or final numbers in this register regarding the same transaction. The case of final disposal entry to be made in Red Ink.

Receipt book No. (Rule 3.60)

Road Certificate No. (Rule 3.59…)

No. of entry in station diary in which detail are given

Reference to the entry in the corresponding Register (No. 20…) relating to the application made for recoupment.

Remark

Nor the month of June, 1926

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

180

1-6-26

Balance

15

15

….

…..

181

5-6-26

By departmental expenses bill dated 20th May, 1926

2

17

150

22

….

18

182

9-6-26

Judicial expenses in case first Information Report No. 27, dated 24thMay, 1926

5

12

184

….

No. 6 date 9thJune, 1926

183

15-6-26

Repairs to bnds and boxes

..

3

9

185

No. 17, dated 15th June, 192

SIC

SIC

By judicial expenses bill, dated 9th June, 1926

5

..

14

182

….

….

15

….

185

25.6.26

By Departmental Expenses bill dated 15-6-1926

173

183

17

186

28-6-26

Judicial expenses in case first Information Report No. 32 dated 15thJune, 1926

7

10

….

No. 22, dated 28thJune, 1926

187

27-6-26

Repairs to Chair

2

8

….

No. 24 dated 29thJune, 1926

Total

25

17

8

..

Amount of Permanent advance Detail of items recoverable with date of application

170

20-6-26

3

186

28-6-26

7

187

29-6-26

2

12

Notes:- (1) A line shall be drawn after each entry.(2) When an item is pending for final adjustment, the red ink number will not be given.

Form No. 3.59

Police Station No.

Road Certificate

District
Police Station
Lines Office

Name of Prisoner and parentage & offence of which accused by the Police with Number of charge-sheet.

Date and time of despatch.

Date and time of arrival at destination.

Description of money or other property sent, with number and weight of each article

Amount of diet money expended on account of prisoners and witnesses

Signature of receiving officer.

Remarks (Including reference to cash book or corresponding entry).

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Signature of the official
remitting the money of property, etc.

Chap IV

Form No. 4.4 (1)

Police Station……………….

District………..

Surveillance Register No. VIII

Sl. No.

Name

Parentage & Caste

Name and serial No. of village

Number of history sheet in a bundle

Date of entry

Brief reasons for entry and signature of officer

Date

Name struck off brief reasons for striking off, with signature of officer

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

(To be drawn by hand on both sides of a fool scape-size register, column 1 to 6 being on the right hand page and columns 7 to 9 on the left hand. The heading to be in big type).

Form No. 4.9

Chap. IV
District…………….

Police Station………..

History Sheet

Name ……. …… alias ………….son of ………… caste …………. resident of ……………. age ………….. Number of F.P. Slip (if prepared)

Serial Index No. in Register

Date of entry

Description

Property end mode of earning livelihood

1

2

3

4

Property (Houses, shops, land, etc.)Means of livelihood (Trade, shop keeping, labour, cultivation, etc.)Name and addresses of relations and connections dependent on him.Name and addresses of associates.In case the name has not been entered in Surveillance Register No. VIII, column 1 will remain blank.

Description of the crime to which believed to be addicted

Convictions

Sl. No.

Name and residence of the complainant.

Reference to F.I.R. And name of police stations.

Law or Section of Law.

Detail or the convictions, with the date of convictions and the names of courts deciding the case.

1

2

3

4

5

Signature of the officer
Preparing the sheet with date.

Part I

Written on oral suspicions

Sl. No.

Name and residence of the complainant

Law and section of the law.

Reference to F.I.R. With date and name of the Police Station or F.I.R. of any other case.

Brief details of reasons leading to suspicion or houses e.g., track evidence, decision of panchayat, enmity with complainant, demand of illegal gratification or any other reason to be entered in full.

Part II

Particulars of Movement

Every entry should be attested and dated by the officer making it.

Sl. No.

Suspictions whether written or oral

Information regarding the particulars of movements or general notes as given by the Station House Officer.

Remarks or orders by gazetted officers or other officer duly authorized.

Form No. 4.14 (1) Part I

Police Station……….

District………

Index to history sheets and personal files Part I

Serial No. of History Sheet & Personal File.

Name and Father’s name

Village

Date on which History Sheet was opended

Whether History is in A or B bundle or on Personal File

Date on which History Sheet & Personal File were transferred to another Police Station or destroyed

Initials of Gazetted officer ordering transfer or destruction of history Sheet & remarks.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Form No. 4.14 (1) Part II

Index to history sheets and personal files, Part II

Name and father’s Name

Village

Serial No. of History Sheet and Personal File

1

2

3

Form No. 4.16 (1)

Form No. 4.16 (1) Form No. 4.16 (1)
Police Station Book No. ……………….

Enquiry Roll

Report of absence or departure of a bad character under surveillance

Police Station ………………….. Distt.

Police Station Book No. …………………….

Enquiry Roll

Report of absence or departure of a bad character under surveillance

Police Station………………….. Distt.

S. No.

Points to be reported on

S. No.

Points to be reported on

S. No.

Points to be reported on

S. No.

Points to be reported on

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1. Police Station 1. Police Station
2. District 2. District
3. Serial Number of roll 3. Serial Number of roll
4. Name, parentage, caste and descriptive marks of registered criminal 4. Name, parentage, caste and descriptive marks of registered criminal
5. Number of surveillance register and particulars of previous convictions. 5. Number of surveillance register and particulars of previous convictions.
6. Class of offence he commits with modus operandi. 6. Class of offence he commits with modus operandi.
7. Place to which he may have gone or is alleged to have gone and for what purpose, with information as to his relatives and associates in such places. 7. Place to which he may have gone or is alleged to have gone and for what purpose, with information as to his relatives and associates in such places.
8. Whether the absence was reported by a village official or was ascertained by a Police Officer. 8. Whether the absence was reported by a village official or was ascertained by a Police Officer.
9. Date and hour at which he left the village with name and residence of associate, if any. 9. Date and hour at which he left the village with name and residence of associate, if any.
10. Date and hour of despatch of this roll and to whom (here enter office or Police Station). 10. Date and hour of despatch of this roll and to whom (here enter office or Police Station).
Signature …………………
Designation …………….
Dated ……………………

Signature …………………
Designation …………….
Dated ……………………

Acknowledgement of Receipt “This should be torn off and returned immediately on receipt of roll”Enquiry Roll ‘Form A’ number…………… or Police Station……………..district………….. was received by me at P.M./A.M. on the The persons named therein have not arrived in the limits of the Police Station, Inquiries are being made.N.B. – If the registered criminal has arrived, strike out the word ‘not’

Signature
Designation……………….
Date………………

Form No. 4.16 (2)

Police Station Register No. X-B Enquiry (Bad Character) Rolls Received

No.

No. of bad character roll and date of Receipt.

Police station from which received.

Name, parentage & residence of suspect

Details contained in roll received as to visit

Date of return of roll with precise of reply

Action taken if any, such as entry in history sheets or personal files of confede. Rates; etc.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Form HV Form No. 4.16 (4)

Police Station……………

District……………..

Enquiry (Bad Character) Roll for publication in Criminal Intelligence Gazette.The Bad character/conditionally released convict whosed description is given below has been absent from his home since……..He is under Police surveillance and it is likely that he will commit crime during his absence-I. Description.Name …………. father’s…………., caste …………. Village …………. Police Station …………… Date of birth …………….. Height …………… feet ………….. inches ………… build ………….. complexion ……………… characteristics, mennerisms, special marks, etc……………II.-Convictions on record

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

III.-Probable associates, relatives and resort.

(names of police stations and district tO be given in large type and underlined.)

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

IV. Form of crime to which addicted with modus operandi………

Superintendent of Police,
……….. District.

Form No. 4.17 (1)

Police Station………….. District……………. State……………..

Information Sheet

Dated…………….

No. ………..Information sheet regarding………………………………alias …………..Parentage/husband’s name……….Caste…………resident of village/mohalla……………………Police Station……………… district………………….height………….particular marks………………………………………information communicated………………………………………………………Information solicited …………………………………………………………………

Sub-Inspector,
Incharge of Police Station

Note. – Information Sheet are the main vehicles for communicating/receiving criminal intelligence to/from one police station to/by another They may be used about residents of other Police Stations (a) who are known or believed to have visited a village in Police Station’s jurisdiction with criminal intent, whether they have been arrested or not, (b) vagrant arrested Under/section 55 Cr-P.C. and (c) those who are genuinely believed to be of suspicious character. Constitution Information sheets may be sent when so ever there are important development in the case and at the conclusion of the case. These sheets should be is sued in triplicate, one copy being sent to the District Crime Record Bureau and 2 copies forwarded to the officer incharge of the Police Station addressed. The receiving police station may after making necessary enquiries, record the information requested for on the back of the two copies of information sheets and send one to the issuing police station.

Form No. 4.17 (2)

Police Station Register No. 12

Police Station……………. …………………..

District……………….

Information sheets Despatched

Date of reciept

Date of Sheet

Name of police station of which received

Name, Parentage, caste and address of suspect

Full description suspect

Details communicated in information sheet

Date of return of sheet

Action taken such as preparation of personal file or history sheet etc.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Form No. 4.17

Police Station Register No. XIII

Police Station……………. …………………..

District……………….

Information sheet Received

Date of reeceipt

Date of sheet

Name of police station from which received.

Name of Parentage, caste and address of suspect

Full description suspect

Datails communicated in information sheet

Date of return of sheet

Action taken such as preparation of personal file or history sheet etc.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Form No. 4.18 (1)

Police Station……………. …………………..

District……………….

Hue and Cry Notice

The Station House Officer of……………Police Station given notice that…………, son of………….., alias…………caste…………..resident of village…………, Police station………….., District…………….whose description is given below (and whose photograph is attached) is evading arrest in a case under section…………….. is absent from his home and is likely to commit offences of………….I.P.C., F.I.R.No………….of 193 of police station……………. district.Action under sections 87/88 C.P.C., in being taken against this man and any person giving information leading to his arrest will be rewarded.Reward offered
Description-Name……………., aged ……………, year…………. build …………… height…………….. complexion.Characteristics, Mannerisms, etc.
District serial No. of R.P. Slip if on record.
Probable associates and resorts-
He is reported likely to visit1. …………2. ……….3. ……….4. ……….5. ……….

(Signature)
Station House Officer.
Police Station.

Form No. 4.20 (1) Part I

District Register of Absconders

Police Station………………..

District ……………

Part-I Absconders in cases Registered in the Home District

(Residents of the home district to be written in red ink)

Serial No.

Name of absconder

Parentage,caste and descriptive roll

Residence, i.e., village Police Station and district

Offence.

F.I.R. No. and date, place and date of offence.

Reward offered

Clues to probable whereabouts

Date of arrest, death, cancellation or removal to proclaimed offender’s list

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Form No. 4.20 (1) Part Ii

District Register of Absconders

Part II Absconders in cases Registered in other District

but Resident of, or likely to visit, the home District:

(Residents of the home district to be written in red ink)

Police Station………….

District……….

Serial No.

Police Station station or district submitting notice

Name of absconder

Parentage, caste and descriptive roll

Residence i.e., village, police Station and District

Offence

F.I.R. No. and date, place and date of offence.

Reward offered

Cluss to probable whereabouts

Date of arrest, death, cancellation or removal to proclaimed offender’s list

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Form 4.21

Register Showing Progress of all Action Against Absconders and Proclaimed Offenders.

Police Station……….

District………

Serial No.

Name, parentage, caste and residence of the absconder

F.I.R. No., offence and police station.

Date absonding

A-Date of application for warrant for arrest

1

2

3

4

5

B-Date of return of warrant of arrest unexecuted

Date of application for order of proclamation under section 87, Cr. P.C. with name of court

Date of publication of proclamation under section 87, Cr. P.C. And steps ordered for giving effect to proclamation

Date of issue of attachment order under section 88, Criminal Procedure Code

Detail of attachable property of the abs conder

6

7

8

9

10

Action of police

Property attached with date of order of court

Date of removal to, proclaimed offender’s registered

Remarks.

11

12

13

14

Form No. 4.22 (1)

Register of Proclaimed offenders under section 87,

Criminal Procedure Code

Police Station………

District………..

Serial No.

Name, caste and parentage of offender.

Description.

Residence.

Station of offence.

F.I.R. No. and District.

Police Station and District.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Detail of stolen property.

In the case of conditionally release who has been declared proclaimed offender-
(1) Offence in which conditionally released.
(2) Village in which released;
(3) Jail from which conditionally released.
(4) Date of release;

(1) Place which the accuse has visited;
(2) or is expected to visit in his own district.
(1) Names.
(2) Relations.
(3) Residence.

8

9

10

In outside district-
(1) Names.
(2) Relations.
(3) Residence.

Reward offered for arrest.

District Serial No. of R.P. Slip.

Remarks

11

12

13

14

Form No. 4.22 (2)

Police Station……….

District………….

Statement Showing the result of action taken against proclaimed offenders during the year/month of………..199……….S. No………… Details1. Class of proclaimed offenders.2. Number of proclaimed offenders residents of the district at the commencement of the year/month.3. Number of persons proclaimed during the year/month.4. Number of proclaimed offenders residents of the district arrested during the year/month.5. Percentage item 4 bears to times 2 and 3.6. Number of proclaimed offenders residents of the District struck off under the provisions of rule 4.23.7. Number of proclaimed offenders still at large at the end of the year/month i.e. items 2, 3, 4, 6 who were proclaimed-

(a) Within 3 months of the close of the year/month.

(b) Between 3 to 6 months of the close of the year/month.

(c) Between 6 to 12 month of the close of the year/month.

(d) More than 12 months ago.

8. Reward paid for the arrest of proclaimed offenders during preceding year/month.Note:- Separate sheets will be prepared for proclaimed offenders who are habitual offenders and others.

Form No. 4.24 (2)

Counter Foil No. …………………….
Police Station …………………… Police Station ……………………
District …………………………. District ………………………….
Notice to watchmen with regard to …………………….
………………………………..
son of …………………………………..
caste ………………………. a resident of …………………… and a proclaimed offender

(Date and method of despatch, i.e., by post, by hand etc.)

To the watchmen of village …………Be informed that the person named and described on the reverse is a proclaimed offender and it is your duty to arrest him wherever found. It is further your duty and that of every owner or occupier of land and of every person employed in the collection of revenue to report immediately to the police any information which you are/he may receive as to the presence of such person. You are required to publish this fact and to warn all concerned and take warning yourself that any person assisting the proclaimed offender in any way to evade arrest or withholding information about him renders himself liable to set penalty under the law.

By Order,
Sub-Inspector,
Incharge of Police Station ………
Signature of Watchmen.
Date………

Description of proclaimed offender.Name and particulars of relatives and others with whom the proclaimed offender is likely to associate.

Form No. 4.26

Police report with a view to the Initiation of Proceedings to take Security to be good behaviour, Sections 110 to 118, Criminal Procedure Code.Page 1. Name, parentage, caste, age, occupation and residence of the person reported on-Table 1. Former convictions.Column 1. Serial No.2. Complainant’s name.3. No. and Date of First Information Report and name of Police Station.4. Law and section of law.5. Particulars of sentence, date of sentence, particulars of the court in which the conviction was obtained.Table 2. Reference to case in which the person reported about has been suspected or in which his house has been searched. Column 1. Serial No.2. Name and resident of complainant.3. Law and section of Law.4. Reference to the first information report, its date, the section to which belonging, or to other first report in the case.5. Brief particulars of the reason for which suspicion was entertained or house was searched, & etc.Table 3. Name of persons of bad character with whom the person reported associates.Pages 2 & 3. Name of witnesses who give evidence of the reputed bad character. An abstract of their statements.Page 4. Report of the officer in charge of the police station.

(The report to include any material information given in the History Sheet prescribed in Rule 4.9)

Form No. 4.29

Released From

Descriptive Roll of Convict the………Jail on the……..
Police Station

District

Personal Description.

Jail Register No.

Name, sex, age and Previous occupation

Religion.

Caste

Father’s name and trade or occupation

Village police station, Tehsil, District

Crime, section of the law with term and date of sentence

(a) features, complexion and distinguishing marks Ft. Inches. Height

Conduct in Jail

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Form No. 4.35 (2)

Report of Change of Residence of Convict Subject to Surveillance Under Section 565, Code of Criminal Procedure.

Police Station………

District …………

Name and father’s name

Caste

Residence Village, Police Station, Tehsil, District or Town Street, Mohalla, Police Station District.

Change or Temporary Change of residence. Village, Police Station, Teshil District or Town, Street, Mohalla, Police Station District

To be entered by officer in charge of Police Station.

Date of departure

Date of departure

Date or arrival.

Change in residence, permanent or temporary.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Form No. 4.33 (1)

Report of arrival at his home of A.P.R. or P.R.T. Convict on Release From Jail.

Police Station …………..

District ………….

District Serial No. of P.R. Slip

Name with aliases

Father’s name and caste

Residence village, Police Station

Offence

Date of release and name of Jail

Reprt of officer in-charge of police station of convict’s arrival at his home or therewise (to be submitted within 10 days of date of release)

Final order of Supeintendent.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Dated the……. 19

Signature of F.P. Recorder

Form No. 55 (1) (C)

Police Station………..

District………

First information report by a complainant

Name, parentage and residence of complainant or informant.Date and time of writing the slip and delivery to Chaukidar.Date and time of receipt at Police Station.Substance of complaint or information which shall be attested by the signature, seal or thumb-impression of complain or informant, and signature or seal or lambardar as witness.

(Check receipt to be sent to the complainant)

Received a written complaint from………of village…….dated……..First Information Report No……..under ………….. section……….I.P.C. has been registered this day.Name of Police Station……. Signature of……… Date………. officer-in-charge.If a First Information Report has not been registered then these words should be struck out and a brief note given below of the action taken.

Form No. 5.5 (1)

First Information Report

First information of a Cognizable Crime Reported under section 154,Code of Criminal Procedure.

Police Station …………
No. ………………….

District ……………..
Date and hour of occurrence ………….

1. Date and hour when reported.2. Name and residence of informant and complainant.3. Brief description of offence (with section) and of property carried off if any.4. Place of occurrence and distance and direction from police station.5. Steps taken regarding investigation, explanation of delay in recording information.6. Date and hour of despatch from Police Station.

Signed……….
Designation………..

(First Information to be recorded below)

Note – The signature, seal or mark of the informant shall be affixed at the foot of the information and shall be attested by the signature of the officer recording the ‘first information.’

(Reverse of Police Station Copy of first Information Report)

(Not to be printed on reverse of other copies)

Index of Case Diaries

(To be filled in immediately on receipt of case diaries)

S. No.

Date of case diary.

Name of investigating officer.

S. No.

Date of case diary.

1

2

3

4

5

Name of investigating officer

S. No.

Date of case diary

Name of investigating officer

6

7

8

9

Information to be filled in When the charge Sheet or final report is submitted,

Date and hour of submission of charge sheet or Final Report and Section under which accused are sent for trial.

Name of witnesses

Name and residence of accused-A-Sent in custody for trial B On bail or recognizance C-Not sent for trial

Property (including weapons found)

1

2

3

4

Information to be filled in as soon as received

Date of receipt of challan in court.

Offence according to which convicted or acquitted

Result of the case (In case of conviction or acquittal, the name of the court, date and detail of the order)

1

2

3

Form No. 5.7

Register of Petty Offences

Under section 154, Criminal Procedure Code intimation under section 157, Criminal Procedure Code diary under Section 172, Criminal Procedure Code and final report under section 173, Criminal Procedure Code of offences against municipal bye laws and under section 34 of Act V of 1861.

Offences Section and law offened against

Substance of information date when and place where offence was committed.

Name, Parentage and Residence of Complainant, Accused

Date and time at which information reached Police Officer

Name of the persons who appear to be acquainted with the circumstances of the case and details of any property sen in the case

Accused how Rewarded. On bail. On recognizance In custody and the reasons why

Finding and sentence

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Form No. 5.12

Special Report of an offence

Police Station …………………
No. ………… of …………. 19.

District ………………..
Dated ……………………..19….

Description of offence and section of law offender against; also distance and direction of place from Police Station and name of sub-Inspector-in-charge

Number of persons Supposed to have been concerned

Arrested

Value of Taken.

Property Recovered

Statement of the case, conduct of the Police, steps taken by them.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Date of occurrence.
Date of report to police.
Superintendent of Police

Copy sent to :(1) District Magistrate………………….(2) Deputy Inspector General………………….(3) ………………………………………………. Range.(4) …………………………………………………. 5

Appendix 6.40 (4)

Directions for and Precautions to be taken in forwarding Article to the Chemical Examiner for Examination and ReportAll articles should, as far as possible, be sent by registered parcel post. If this cannot be done and the articles are important, they should be sent by hand. Only very heavy and unimportant articles should be sent by rail.

Human Poisoning Cases

1. Fatal. – The following articles should be forwarded in all cases:-

    (1) Stomach with contents. The stomach should be securely tied at both ends.(2) A piece of the small intestine (about 3 feet) securely tied at both ends.(3) A Portion of the liver (not less than 16 Ounces), one kidney and piece of spleen.(4) Urine or stomach washings if available.(5) A sample of the preservative fluid used.

Note.- (1) Rectified spirit should be used in all cases unless alcohol, phosphorus or carbolic acid poisoning is suspected. In such cases normal saline solution should be used.

II. In suspected coal-ges (charcol) poisoning, sample of the blood should be sent in a small bottle-properly corked Add two drops only of formalin to prevent decomposition if available.

III. Ashes and burnt bones should only be sent where a metallic poison is suspected. Vegetable poisons are destroyed during cremation.

Documents which should be forwarded:-By post-(1) Post-mortem Report.

    • Note: Information on the following toxicologically important points should invariably be supplied-

(a) Date and hours of onset of symptoms;

(b) date and hour of death;

(c) in cases where the body has been exhumed, dates of burial and of exhumation should be entered in column headed “Death”

(d) in cases of suspected irritant poisoning, the condition of the gastrointestinal tract, as regards emptiness or otherwise, as well as any abnormal appearance of the mucous membrances should be special by noted.

    • The following information should also be given:-

(a) note of symptoms observed by the Medical Officer if the case has been seen during life by him, (b) note of nature and duration of treatment, if any, adopted by the Medical Officer, Police, or Friends of deceased.

    • (2) Statements of symptoms [Police from 6.36 (i)] supplied by the Police to the forwarding Medical Officer. (This from should be carefully filled in by the Police, nothing particularly the early or first symptoms observed).(3) Certified copy of Police Reports sent with the case to the forwarding Medical Officer.(4) Forwarding memo, and invoice list of articles forwarded for examination to the Chemical Examiner.(5) Impression or imprint of seal used to seal the packages.

Notes. – (1) The seal should be a private one, and the same seal should be used throughout. The impression should be attached to the forwarding memo (No. 4), and should be protected by a thin layer of cotton wool to prevent its being broken in transit.

    An undetected case on being detected should be underlined(2) An imprint of the seal on a piece of piece is better than an impression of the seal.

B Under cover of the box containing the articles for examination-

    (1) Duplicate copies of forwarding memo, invoice list of articles sent for analysis.(2) Duplicate impression or preferably imprint of seal used in the case.

Notes. – Make sure that the bottles are properly corked and packed otherwise leakages stain the documents inside.

II. Non-Fatal. – Vomit, stomach washings purged matter, urine and suspected articles of food should be sent whenever available.Documents which should be forwarded:-A By post-

    (1) Statement of symptoms [Police form 6.36 (i)](2) Note of symptoms observed by the Medical Officer.(3) Note of treatment, if any, adopted by the Medical Officer, Police or patient’s friends.(4) Forwarding memo (original) and invoice list of articles forwarded for examination. The nature of the preservative fluid used. If any, should be stated.(5) Impression or imprint or seal used to seal the packages.

B. Under cover of box containing the articles for examination-

    (1) Duplicate copy of forwarding memo, and invoice list of articles sent for analysis, and police form No….6.36 (1).(2) Duplicate impression or imprint of seal used in the case.

Abortion cases.

I. Fatal. – As in fatal human poisoning cases, but in addition, the uterus and upper part of the vagina should invariable be sent, along with any foreign bodies found in the genital tract.II. Non-fatal – As in non-fatal poisoning cases, but, in addition, any foreign bodies expelled or removed from the vagina or uterus should be sent.

Blood stain cases.

The entire garments or other articles suspected to be stained with blood should be sent. if possible, on portions removed or cut from them. A label with number and description of the articles should be stitched or tied (not gummed or pasted) to each separate article, care being taken that the labels correspond with the invoice list of articles. When the label is tied to the articles the string should be sealed.

Notes. – (1) Take care that the stains are quite dry before being packed for examination. Wet stains readily decompose.

An undetected case on being detected should be underlined(2) Do not make a circle with ink or indelible pencil around the suspected stains. In wet weather or during examination such circles run into the stain and interfere with the tests.An undetected case on being detected should be underlined(3) Wet blood stains on a culprit’s body should be removed with a clean cotton swab and properly dried before being sent for analysis. Dry blood stains on a culprit’s body may be gently scrapped into an envelope and then despatched for analysis.Documents which should be forwarded.A. By post-

    (1) Forwarding memo and invoice list of articles for examination.(2) Impression or imprint of seal used in the case.

B. With the articles-

    (1) Duplicate copy of forwarding memo and invoice list.(2) Duplicate impression or imprint of seal used in the case.

Semen cases

The entire garment, etc., should be sent. The cloth should not be folded at the stained portion. The stain should be kept quite flat, and should be protected by a thin layer of cotton wool on each surface.

Notes:-It is better to send swabs from the vaginal mucus than mounted slides. These swabs should be first dried and then forwarded in a small box or phial carefully labelled.

Rules for preserving and packing exhibits for transmission to the Chemical Examiner.1. The suspected organs or other exhibits should be placed in a clean glass bottle or jar having a good fitting stopper or cork. Wide mouthed bottles or jars of sufficient size must be used, otherwise the contents readily decompose. It is also difficult to empty narrow-mouthed bottles or jars that are tightly packed.II. Materials that are liable to decompose should be preserved by one of the following methods:-

    (1) In cases of suspected human poisoning other than alcohol, phosphorus, carbolic acid and some of the lesser known volatile poisons, the material sent should be immersed in rectified spirit. The spirit should be sufficient to cover the material immersed in what ever position the vassal containing it may by hold. On no account use common bazaar spirit A separate four ounce bottle of the rectified spirit added should be sent for independent analysis as a control.(2) In those cases mentioned above whether rectified spirit should not be added, the preservative used should be salt solution and the same precaution for immersion of material should be exercised. A salt solution is made by adding a full table spoonful of salt about a pint of fresh clean water. A separate four ounce bottle of this salt solution should be sent for independent analysis as a control.(3) If two or more examination have to be made on the same occasion, the medical officer should complete one and label and seal the articles connected with it before commencing a second examination, otherwise there is risk of the viscera, etc. of one case getting mixed with those of an other. He should clean his instruments and vessels before commencing the second case.(4) In cases of suspected cattle poisoning, the viscera or other material should be preserved in rectified spirit with the same precautions as those exercised in human poisoning cases (item 2).(5) It is advisable to keep a sample of the preservative added under lock and key in case the bottle containing the sample sent to the Chemical Examiner should arrive broken.

II. Great care should be taken that the stopper or cork of the bottle or jar fits tightly; especially this is necessary during the hot weather when rectified spirit is added as a preservative. The stopper may first be canal waxed and then carefully tied down with leather or water proof and sealed.IV. To secure identity, the bottles or jars should be properly labelled with a list of the contents.V. The bottles or jars should then be placed in a strong wooden box with plenty of packing material to ensure against any breakages during transit. Saw dust, cotton wool, and dried grass are suitable for this purpose. Old office papers etc. should not be sent as the copies of the forwarding documents enclosed in the box are liable to be thrown away with this waste paper packing material. Keep these documents well away from the bottles as breakages or leakages are apt to strain them.VI. The box itself should be covered with common garha cloth properly sewed and sealed. Seals should be at short intervals or there inches along each line of sewing. All the seals must be similar and preferably the wan should be of the same kind. The seal used should be the ordinary office seal and must be kept under lock and key. Current coins, or a series of straight curved or crossed lines must not be used as seals. The box should be properly addressed and sufficient stamps added to cover postage. The box must also be franked.VII. Under no circumstances should viscera from different case be included in the same parcel.VIII The despatching officer who is invariably the Civil Surgeon or another medical officer authorised to conduct post-mortem examination, is personally responsible that these instructions are carefully followed.

Notes: – In order to minimise the chances of parcels being lost in transit between the office of the Chemical Examiner and the Railway Station all articles for medico-legal examination should be sent by post as possible or better still be hand.

IX. In cases where the police send a closed parcel through the medical officer and the latter has no occasion to open it in transmission, the parcel should be packed in a second cloth cover and the forwarding memo should also be enclosed. This procedure is necessary and prevents cases getting mixed up on received in the Chemical Examiner’s office.X. A declaration of the contents to the Postal authorities is unnecessary.

Appendix 6.14 (2)

Instructions for Dealing with substances for Objects Suspected of Being Explosive

Introduction

Explosive substances or objects which may cause explosion may be met within the following forms:-A. Liquids. – For example nitro glycerin. These will rarely have to be dealt with. The possession of a liquid explosive is generally illegal.B. Solids.(1) Blasting explosives. – Dynamite, Galantine Dynamite, Blasting Galantine, Gelignite, etc. These are usually made up in cylinder form about two inches long in water-proof paper wrappers, stamped with the maker’s name. They vary in consistency from a tough leathery material to a soft one like ordinary stiff-jelly.(2) Gunpowder – May be black, brown or grey and is made up in cylinder form, cubes, pebbles, grains and powder.(3) Gun Cotton. – Is white and is supplied in slabs or cylinders or loose like ordinary cotton wool.(4) Gun, rifle and shot gun powders. – These are generally in cords, tapes or grains, but are found as small cubes or flakes. In colour they may be white, pink, yellow, blue or black.(5) Fulminates. – These are white or grey powders. They are extremely dangerous. Their possession is generally illegal.(6) Picric acid and picrates. – These are crystalline or may be in powder form. They have a brilliant yellow colour if pure. A licence is required for their possession.(7) (a) Ammonal. – This is a mixture of tri-nitro-toluene, ammonium nitrate aluminium powder and charcoal. It is a silvery brown paste.(b) Amatol. – Is a mixture of tri-nitro toluence and ammonium nitrate in appearance it is a brown paste.(8) Chlorate of potash. – May be found in clear tabular crystals or as a white powder.(9) Sulphide of arsenic.- Is generally found as a yellow or orange powder.(10) Carbide or phosphide of calcium. – Under certain circumstances these may cause violent explosion.(11) Detonators and caps. – These are explosives made up in metal tubes or small metal caps. Military detonators, triction tubes and time fuses are made in a great variety of forms. All detonators should be handled with the utmost care.(12) Fuse. – This is slow burning gunpowder rolled up in cloth or paper in the form of long cards. Military fuses are made up in metal bodies in great variety of forms.(13) Cartridges. – These are explosives contained in receptacles such as bottles, jars, coconut shells, cloth, jute or hemp, balls or bundles, books, letters, tins, metal shells, bamboo, tubes, wate cistern floats, chatties, etc, the whole being designed to explode by precautions, fuse; trigger, by being inverted etc.(15) Fireworks. – Fireworks are provided with a fuse of touch paper or slow match. Throwdowms, crackers, explosives, corks or objects designed to explode by precautions, provided they are not detonators, caps or cartridges are not fireworks, but bombs.(16) Rockets. – Some rockets are not fireworks. Life saving signal and military rockets are dangerous and should be handled with care.Signals. – These may be ships flares, signal lights, etc. They are not fireworks.C. Gases.-Liquid or compressed gases (ammonia, oxygen hydrogen, acetylene, carbon di-oxide) in cylinder, sparklets, etc. may under certain circumstances cause violent explosion.

Instruction

A local police officer should communicate at once with the Superintendent of Police, who will himself proceed, or depute some responsible officer to proceed, to the place to carry out the following instructions1. If you have any reason, however slight, to suspect that the substances or object with which you are dealing is dangerous then regard it as being Highly Explosive until such time as it is proved to be otherwise.2. During the removal, guarding or examination of any substance or object suspected of being explosive, all unnecessary persons whether police or otherwise should be sent away.3. If the substance you are examining is Liquid, proceed as in paragraph 6 or 7 Solid, proceed as in paragraphs 8,9 or 10 Gas proceed as in paragraph 11.Detonator or cap,Fuse,Cartridge, Proceed as in Paragraph 12.Firework,Rocket,Signal Light,Bomb, Proceed as in paragraph 13.6. (1) If the substance is a liquid in an open vassal carefully dip into the liquid a pencil or thin piece of stick and allow one drop to fall on a small piece of blotting paper or tin foil (silver paper) Remove this ten yards or more from the vessels containing the bulk of the liquid, place it upon a flat surface of iron or stone and strike it a sharp glancing blow with a flat headed hammer. Repeat the test three times with fresh drops and also by burning a fresh drop of the liquid on blotting paper in the flame of a spirit lamp or candle.(A) The substance explodes or burns rapidly. – Place about half an ounce of the liquid in a small clean bottle, carefully cork it up (do not use a glass or metal stopper), and after packing in cotton wool in a box or tin, send it by messenger to the Inspector of Explosives, Northern India, with your report. The bulk of the liquid should be locked up in an isolated place until instructions are received from the Inspector of Explosives, Northern India, as to its disposal.(B) The substance does not explode or burn rapidly. – Place about half an ounce of the liquid in a small clean bottle, cork up and after packing send by post to the Inspector of Explosives, Northern India with your report, the bulk of the liquid should be locked up in any convenient place until the report of the Inspector of Explosives is received.7. (1) When the substance is a liquid in a closed vessel. – If the vessel is a bottle and is not suspected of being a bomb and the stopper will not come out when using only moderate power, do not attempt to open but send it by messenger to the nearest Inspector of Explosives together with your report, first having carefully packed, the bottle upright in a box with straw, sawdust, or paper, etc.(2) If the vessel is a bottle and is not suspected of being a bomb and the stopper will come out, then proceed as in paragraph 6.(3) If the vessel is not suspected of being a bomb and is of metal or other hard material and the stopper will not come out when moderate force is used, do not attempt to open but remove the vessel very gently, and in such a manner as to expose it to as little shaking as possible, and without turning it over in any way, to such open place of safety in the vicinity as may be available, where its ignition or explosion would be attended with a minimum of mischief, e.g., a yard or a garden or other open space from which the public are or can be excluded. Tie two pieces of strong cord to the vessel passing one cord round a hook or tree and from round the corner of a building and after all persons have been removed from within range, pull the cords backward and forward so that vessel is upset and given as severe a shaking as possible, then leave the vessel alone for twelve hours.If explosion is not obtained and the vessel is not too large send it by messenger to the Inspector of Explosives with your report.If the vessel is a large one, try once, try once more to open it using more force. If you cannot open it, remove the vessel the vessel to a convenient place where it can be locked up and send a copy of your report and all connected papers to the Inspector of Explosives.8. When the substance is a solid in an open vessel – (1) Carefully take out with a piece of cardboard or flat stick a few grains of the solid and after removing it ten yards or more away from the vessel or vessels containing the bulk of the substance, place it upon a flat surface of iron or stone and strike it a sharp glancing below with a flat headed hammer Repeat the test three times with flesh substance and also try burning a small portion on blotting paper in the flame of a spirit lamp or candle.(A) The substance explodes or burns rapidly. – Take a very small amount of substance, add to it a little water and notice what happens. If the substance undergoes no change and there is no sign of any gas being given off, or of heat being generated, place about half an ounce of the substance in a small clean bottle and fill up with clean water. Cork the bottle carefully, taking the precaution not to use a glass or metal stopper, and then pack it in cotton wool in a box or tin and send it by messenger to the Inspector of Explosives with your report.The bulk of the substance then be covered with clean water and locked up in an isolated place until instruction are received from the Inspector of Explosives as to its disposal.(B) The substance does not explode or burn rapidly. – Test a small amount of the substance with water in exactly the same way as detailed in (A). If the substance undergoes no change and there is no sign of any gas being given off. or of heat being generated, place about half an ounce of the substance in a small clean bottle and fill up with water. Cork the bottle carefully, and after packing, send it by post to the Inspector of Explosives with your report.The bulk of the substance should then be covered with clean water and locked up in any convenient place until the report of the Inspector of Explosives is received.(2) If you find that the substance under sub-paragraphs (A) and (B) does undergo a change, etc., when water is added proceed exactly as before, except that the sample in all cases should be sent dry and the bulk also kept dry. Make certain that your bottle is absolutely dry before you put the sample into it.9. When the substance is a solid in a closed vessel. – (1) If the vessel is a bottle and is not suspected of being a bomb and the stopper will not come out when only moderate power is used, do not attempt to open it but sent it by messenger to the Inspector of Explosives together with your report, first having carefully packed the bottle upright in a box with straw, sawdust, paper etc.(2) If the vessel is a bottle and is not suspected of being a bomb and the stopper will come out then proceed as in.(3) If the vessel is not suspected of being a bomb and is of metal or other hard material proceed as in 7 (2).10. When the substance is calcium carbide or calcium phosphide. – If it is desired to destroy calcium carbide or calcium phosphide, this can be done by dropping them into deep water, but not more than half a pound at a time, waiting until no more gas is given off before a fresh portion is destroyed.11. When the substance is a gas – Cases are generally found compressed in cylinder, sparklets, etc. They should be kept cool and away from the direct rays of the sun. It is desired to know what gas in any cylinder, the whole cylinder should be sewn up in a coir matting and sent by train to the Inspector of Explosives together with your report. Small cylinders or sparklets only a few inches long can be sent by post if well packed in cotton wool in a wooden box.12. When the object is a detonator, cap, fuse, cartridge, firework, rocket, light, these should never, under any circumstances, be sent through the post. A few should be carefully packed separately in cotton wool in a wooden box and be sent by hand to the Inspector of Explosive together with your report. The bulk should be locked up in an isolated place.13. when the object is a bomb – (1) These may be met within the following forms:-A. Military grenades.B. Copies of military grenadesC. Bombs made up in soda bottles, jam tins, watter cistern floats, chatties, coconut shells, bundles of jute of bamboo tubes, etc.D. Book bombs.E. Letter bombs.(2) Any of these may be designed to explode-

(a) when moved in any way.

(b) when turned over.

(c) when placed in water.

(d) when thrown down.

(e) by lighting a fuse.

(f) by clock work.

(g) By chemical reaction.

(3) Before touching the bomb examine it where it lies and see if you can detect the arrangement for firing. See if there is any trigger and, if so, if it is set or not Do not move the bomb unless you are satisfied that it is safe to do so. If you are not satisfied then place a guard over the bomb and report to your senior officer.A. Military grenades – The first thing to do is to see that the safety pin is in position, that it is not broken or corrode and that the ends are well played out so that it cannot be jolted out. See that the jaws of the lever are in good condition and support the striker correctly. Being satisfied on these points, the base should be unscrewed and if the igniter set is present, it should be carefully removed. Pack the igniter set and the bomb in cotton wool in separate wooden boxes and, send by hand to the Inspector of Explosives together with your report.If the safety pin and lever are missing and the sticker is inside the it will probably have to be destroyed inside. Set a guard over it where it lies and report to your senior officer.B. Copies of military grenades – These are generally something like a military grenade but are of cruder finish. They must only be handled by persons who have handled bombs before. It is generally possible to render them harmless by removing an explosive cap or tuft of gun cotton. This should only be done when you are satisfied that the trigger is safe. Do not put this type of bomb in water but, provided the trigger has been made safe, it should be packed in cotton wool in a wooden box and be sent by hand to the Inspector of Explosives together with your report.C. Bombs made up in soda bottles, etc – First arrange a string bag and strong cord over a large bucket of hot watter. Carefully remove the bomb keeping it in the is me position as found and place it in the bag and from round the corner or a building first having sent everybody present under cover lower the bomb into the hot water and leave it there for 24 hours. The water will then be cold.It may then be taken out and be carefully packed in wet straw or cotton wool in a wooden box and be sent by hand to the Inspector of Explosives together with your report.It the bomb is will made and there is a possibility that the water may not have penetrated inside, it should be given the rough treatment described in paragraph 7 (3) before being sent away.Book Bombs – These are bombs made up in book form and are generally designed to explode when the book is opened or turned over. Such a bomb should be very carefully taken to an isolated place, keeping it in the original position all the time and be locked up. Send a report on the subject to the Inspector of Explosives.E. Letter bombs – These are letters containing explosives which are designed to explode when opened. Place the whole latter in a bucket of water. When the latter is quite wet, pack it in a tin in wet cotton wool and sent by band to the Inspector of Explosives together with your report.Body Traps– 1. “Body Traps”, are bombs generally designed to explode in the presence of an officer who is engaged in searching suspected premises.2. They may be designed to explode when the bomb is moved in any way or electric contact is made by some action of the officer or by clock work or chemical means.3. The most prevalent procedure is to cause one bomb to explode in a house by time fuse, such as a burning candle, leaving a second bomb 1 which will explode when the officer comes to investigate the first explosion, or the officer may be tempted to the house by a message, telephone call, etc.4. Another method is to leave the second bomb with an obvious means of ignition such as a burning candle in the hope that the officer will extinguish the candle and than consider the bomb as safe whereas it is really designed to explode if moved in any way.5. Never enter a house or room in which you suspect body traps by the obvious way. First smash a window or knock a hole in the wall with a crowbar opposite the door to see if the door can be safely opened.6. Enter the house or room very slowly touching nothing until each object has been carefully examined Make a loop at the end of lond rope and drop the loop over each object which might be a bomb without touching it. These may be such things as tins, trunks, kettles, lamps, buckets, boxes, clocks, etc. From outside the room or house jerk the object about by means of the rope and do not enter the room or house again for some minutes in each case. Open the lids of boxes or trunks by means of the rope from round to corner.7. If an unexploded bomb is discovered after this treatment proceed as in paragraph C above.

Form No. 6.2 (1)

Order to Require Attendance at Investigation Under Section 160 and and 175, Criminal Procedure Code

Name…………son of……………….Caste ………………………. Resident of.Whereas the presence of the aforesaid person is necessary for the purpose of enquiry into the offence reported to have been committed under section………………….. at Police Station………………….. therefore the said person is hereby directed to appear before the undersigned at (place………………. hour……………. date …………) there to give such information relating. to the said alleged offence as he may possess.

Signature and designation of issuing
Police Officer.
Hour ……….

Date…………Note:-…………….. mentioned in this order attended on ……………… at………….. at…………. and was permitted to leave on ……………. at ……………at………..Date………

Signature and Designation of issuing Police Officer

Form No. 6.24 (1) (A)

Police Station…………

District …………

Notice of search in the case of State Versus …………… F.I.R. No……………….. Dated………… Offence……………

Section 165/166, Criminal Procedure Code

Date and place of search

Name, parentage, residence and caste of the person to be searched

Articles to be searched for

Reasons for which the searched is to be made

1

2

3

4

Officer-in-charge
Signature of………..
Investigating Officer

Endorsement in case the officer causing the search to be made is unable to conduct in person.I hereby authorise …………….. to conduct the search as I am unable to conduct it in person for the following reasons:-

Signature of Officer-in-charge/Investigating Officer.

Form No. 6.24 (1) (B)

Order under section 103 (1), Criminal Procedure Code, requiring attendance of a witness at a search

F.I.R. No……… dated……… Section ………… Police Station…………………. ……………To……………………………….Whereas it is necessary to make a search in the above mentioned house shop/place of……….. situated in………….. therefore …………… call upon you to attend the aforesaid house/shop/place at …………….. 0′ clock on/forthwith to witness the search.N.B.-Failure to attend without reasonable cause in punishable under section 187, Indian Penal Code.Dated

Signature and designation of the officer
Conducting the search.

Form No. 6.24 (1)(c)

Form of Search List Prescribed By Section 103 (2). Criminal Procedure Code

F.I.R. No…………………… dated ……….Police station.The house of…………… son of………………. cate resident of village,……………… was searched in the presence of the undermentioned witnesses and the following articles were recovered and taken into possession by the police on the statement and indication of ……….. son of ………… ,caste ………village ………….. accused in the above mentioned case.Cross out if not applicable.

Place from which recovered.
Signature and designation of the officer conducting the search.

Articles.
Name and signature of the witnesses.
Date.

Form No. 6.34 (1) (A)

Police Station

District…….

Death Report-Sudden Death From Natural Causes Death Report No.

Dated…….

1.

Name and place where death occurred.

2.

Distance and direction from the police station in whose jurisdiction it is.

3.

Date and hour of discovery of the death.

Son of

4.

Name, parentage and residence of two or more persons who identify the body as that of the deceased person named in this report

Resident of

Note—Relatives of deceased, or two respectable witnesses to identification should be obtained, if possible.

5.

Name of deceased

Parentage Caste

Residence

Condition in life.

6.

Age and sex

Age Sex

7.

Condition of clothes, ornaments, etc. as not indicating an unnatural death.

8.

Position of the limbs, eyes and month.

9.

Expression of the countenance.

10.

Injuries or marks of violence the body may have received. “Wounds and bruises.” Position, length and breath.

11.

Blood, liquid or clotted; where oozed from and to what amount.

12.

In what manner, or by what weapon or instrument, such marks of injuries of violence appear to have been inflicted

13.

Is the body well nourished and vigorous or emaciated and weak?

14.

Apparent cause of death.

15.

Any signs of death having been caused by violence or poison or, any rumours of such being the case.

16.

Description of each article of clothing , ornaments, covering, weapon, etc. found on or near the body

To be made out on separate sheet of paper,

17.

Sketch plan of the scene of death.

18.

Brier history of the case.

19.

Signature of two or more respectable inhabitants present at investigation and of investigating officer with date and place of signing.

Form No. 6.34 (1) (B)

Death Report Unnatural Death By Violence

Police Station ………..

Death Report No………
Dated………….1. Name of place where the death occurred or where body was found (State which).2. Distance and direction from police station in whose jurisdiction it is.3. Date and hour of discovery of the death.4. Names, parentage and residence of two or more persons who identify the body as that of the deceased person named in the report.

(Note:-Relations of the deceased or two respectable witnesses to identification should be obtained, if possible).

5. Name, parentage, caste, residence and condition in life of the deceased.6.Age and sex.7. Condition of the clothes, ornaments, etc and marks of either having been forcibly removed or of being stained with blood or other matter.

(Note. If the Civil Surgeon or other Medical Officer is expected to attend to examine the body this information should be filed in so far a can be seen and without touching or removing any clothes, and in such case it should be completed after he has finished his examination of the body).

8. Position of the limbs, eyes and mouth.9. Expression of the countenance.10. Injuries or marks of violence the body may have received. Wounds and bruises. Show position, length and breadth.

(Note.-Not depth. Be careful not to probe wounds. If the civil Surgeon or other Medical Officer be expected to attend to examine the body, this information should be filled in after he has completed his examination.)

11. Blood, liquid or clotted where oozed from and to what amount.12. In what manner or by what weapon or instrument such marks of injuries or of violence appear to have been committed?13. Was there any rope or other article round the neck, of any merk of ligature on the neck?14. Had such rope or article apparently been used to produce strangulation, and, if the body had been suspended by it, could it probably have supported the body.In what mode was the either end of the rope attached to the support.15. Where there any foreign matters such as weeds straw etc. in the hair or clenched in the hand of the deceased, or attached to any part of the body,16. Is the body well nourished and vigorous or emaciated and feeble?17. Is it stout, thin or decomposed?18. Height by measuring from head to feet.19. Distinguishing marks-Position and appearance of moles, etc.20. Apparent cause of death.To be made out on separate sheet of paper.21. Are there any circumstances or rumours tending to show deceased killed himself ?22. Description of each article found on body (to be labelled and sealed).23. Description of each article found near (to be labelled and sealed) the dead body.24. Sketch plan of the place where body was found.

Form-No. 6.34 (1) (C)

Death Report-Unnatural Death By Poisoning

Death Report No……….. ……… Police Station……….Particulars relating to the case, in addition to those given in Form No………………..1. Was deceased in good health previous to the attack?2. If not in good health, what was he suffering from?3. What medicine was he taking?4. What did the last meal consist?5. What was the interval between the last meal and the commencement of the symptoms?6. What did the deceased last eat or drink before the commencement of the symptom?7. What was the interval between the very last time he ate or drunk, and the commencement of the symptoms?8. What were the first symptoms?9. Was he thirsty?.10. Did he become faint?11. Did the complain of head ache or giddiness?12. Did he appear to have lost the use of his limb?13. Did he sleep heavily?14. Was he at any time insensible?15. Did convulsion occur?16. Did he complain of any peculiar taste in his mouth?17. Did he notice any peculiar taste in his food or drink?18. Was he sensible in the intervals between the conclusions?19. Did he complain of burning or burning or ingling in the mouth and throat, or of numbness and ting in limbs?20. Was there vomiting?21. Was there purging?22. Was there pain in the stomach.23. Mention any outer symptoms?24. Had the deceased ever suffered previously from a similar attach?25. How many other persons partook of the meal or food, or drink by which the deceased is supposed to have been poisoned?26. How many were affected by it, and in what way?27. Did the deceased move from the place where the first symptoms were noticed, if so, how far?Dated

(Signature of Officer conducting the in quest.)
(Signature of two more respectable inhabitants of the place present at the investigation)

Name …….. Rank. ……….A. ……………………
B……………………..

Form No. 6.36 (1)

Police Station……………………

District………………..

Form to Accompany Body or Injured Person sent for Medical Examination

1. Name to injured or deceased person, parentage, caste, residence and condition of life.2. Sex and supposed age.3. Report of Police Officer:

(a) Description of any injuries or marks of violence received, wounds and bruises, position, length and breadth.

(b) Brief report by despatching police officer stating the manner in which the injuries or death is supposed to have been caused. If by poison, the poison suspected to have been used.

(c) Date and hour it was administered, and date and hour of commencement of symptoms, the date and hour of death, and the nature and duration of treatment adopted by the police or friends of the deceased.

4. Brief report and opinion in simple language dictated by the medical Officer and followed by his initials:

(a) As to the means by which the injuries were caused.

(b) In the case of injuries poisoning not causing death, the extent of the injuries or sickness, and in the latter case, the nature of the poison ascertained or suspected.

(c) In the case of death (1) whether death by violence is ascertained and cause of death, and (2) whether death is suspected for poisoning, the poison as contained or suspected.

The following kinds of hurts only are designated as ‘grievous’ as stated in section 320, Indian Penal Code.

First by

Emasoulation.

Secondly

Permanent privation of the sight of either eye.

Thirdly

Permanent privation of the hearing of either ear.

Fourthly

Privation of any member or joint.

Fifthly

Destruction or permanent disfiguration of the head or face.

Sixthly

Permanent disfiguration of the head or face.

Seventhly

Fracture or dislocation of a bone or tooth.

Eightly

Any hurt which endangers life or which causes the sufferer to be during the space of twenty days, in severe bodily pain, or unable to follow his ordinary pursuits.

Add the following on the back of Police Rule Form No. 6.38 Injury Report Form:-

From No. 6.43 (Viii)

Information Regarding Animal Poisoning

Police Station …………….
F.I.R. No. ………….

District …………………….
Section ………………….

Points to be specially noted.

1.

Class of animal (horse, buffalo or bullock etc).

1.

2.

Age and general condition previous to poisoning.

2.

3.

The symptoms after the posion was given or before death.

3.

4.

How long the after feeding the symptoms were in coming on?

4.

5.

What the prominet symptoms were?

5.

6.

How long the animal lived after the symptoms made their appearance?

6.

7.

What poison was supposed to have been used?

7.

8.

Appearance presented by the carcass after death.

8.

9.

Any other particulars likely to be of value.

9.

Dated …………. 19.

Officer-in-charge of Police Station

Form No. 6.47 (4)

Bill for Expenses Incurred in Maintaining- Cattle During Investigation

District……..

Police Station……..
Bill No.
Case First Information Report No……… dated ………… 19

Date

Name and Address of payee

Number and date of case diary

Full details of cattle and the rate of amount to be paid

Amounts

1

2

3

4

5

Rs. P.

(To be drawn by hand)

Total (in words) Rs ……..
Station ……….
Date…………..

Form No. 6.52

Case Diary

Police Station………..

District……………

First Information Report of…………. Case Diary No…………..

19. ….

Date and place of occurrence.

Time and date of receipt in police Station.

Time and date of despatch from Police Station.

Offence:-

Date (with hour) on which action was taken

Serial No. of report

Record of investigation

Case Diary-(continued)

Form No. 6.54 (1)

Charge sheet

District ………………….. Charge sheet No.
Police Station ………………. in first information No. ………….

Dated ……………19……………
No. ……………..
Dated ………………….

Name, address and occupation of complainant or informant

Names and address of accused person not sent up for trail, whether arrested or not arrested, including absconders (show absconders in red ink)

Name and address of accused person sent for trial.
In custody on bail or cognizance.

Property (including weapon) found, with particulars of where, when and by whom, found and whether forwarded to magistrate.

Names and address of witnesses

Charge or information:-
Name and offence and circumstances in concise detail, and under what section of the law charged.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Despatched ……….A.M./P.M on ……..19

Signature of Investigating Officer.

Form No. 6.55 (2) (I)

Final Report under Section 173, Criminal Procedure Code.

District………. Final report No……… dated ………..19………Police Station ………… in first information No……… ,dated ……. 19………..1. Name and address of complainant or informant.2. Nature of charge or complaint.3. Description of property stolen, if any.4. Names and addresses of accused persons, if any.5. If arrested, date and hour of arrest.6. Date and hour of release and whether on bail or recognizance.7. Property (including weapons) found, with particulars of where, when and by whom, found and whether forwarded to Magistrate.8. Brief description of information or complaint, action taken by police result, and reasons for not proceeding further with investigation..Despatched ………..at A.M./P.M. on……………. 19

Signature of Investigating Officer.

N.B.-The Magistrate should record his order on the back.

Form No. 7.7 (1)

Certificate Regarding Identity of An Accused

From Police Station…………. ,district…………… To sub-Inspector of Police Station……….. district ………………Accused…………….. ,son of………….. ,caste………….. age …………..description …………. ,resident of Mohalla ……………village or city ………….. police station …………. ,district ………… ,has today been arrested in connection with first information report No ……….. under section ……… He gives his name and residence as noted above, and states that he is known to………. and ………… Sarpanch and respectable men of the village. Kindly answer the questions written on reverse of this certificate.Dated ………..

Signature of Station House Officer.

(Reverse)

Questions

No.

Answers

1.

2

3

1. Are his name, address and residence as given by him correct?
2. Can the Sarpanch and respectable men identify the man of his name, address and residence and do they give the same description as given by me on reverse?
3. if already classed “P.R.” convict, the district serial No. of the “P.R.” slip should be noted.
4. If he is not a “P.R.” convict, should he be recommended to be declared a ‘P.R.’ or ‘P.R.T.’ convict now?
5. Give his previous convictions in detail, if any.

Reply

From Police Station……… district………. To Sub-inspector of Police station ………… ,district …………..The History of this man has been ascertained through………… of ……….. and your questions have been answered.Dated ……………..

Signature of Station House Officer

Form No. 7.8 (2)

Police Station ………………

District ……………….

Report of Arrest

(Under Section 62, Criminal Procedure Code)

Has the honour to report that………. son of…………. ,caste……….. resident of………. has been apprehended (or detained, as the case may be) this day at……….. O’clock, as he is accused, of…………..Dated…………..
The………….

Sub-Inspector

To be lithographed on a post-card.

Form No. 7.13 (4)

Register No. X

Police Station………..

District…………..

Register of Deserters

Serial No.

Date of entry in this register

Name, parentage, caste and description of deserter

Residence

Date of desertion and regiment or corps of deserter

Reference to letter intimating information regarding deserter

Date of arrest

Name and rank of officer arresting deserter

Remarks showing action taken to secure arrest

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

To be drawn by hand in an open full scape size register maintained in the office of Superintendent according to police stations. Similar register to be maintained in each police station.

Form No. 7.13 (5)

Descriptive Roll of a Deserter

Police Station ………………..
………………District

………………District
Annual Serial No. ……………..

1. Name
2. Father’s name Village
Police Station
3. Caste 4. Residence District
4. Description 6. Regiment to which belonging
7. Date of desertion. 8. Place of desertion
9. Remarks

Form No. 7.20 (5)

Identification of Suspects

Police Station………

District…………….

Note:-Whenever it is necessary to submit any person suspected of having been concerned in any offence for identification, particular care should be taken, pending the arrival of the identifying witnesses to keep the suspect in some place where they cannot have access to him. On their arrival the suspect should be placed with 8 or 9 men similarly dressed, and of the same religion and status, and the identification carried out whenever possible in the presence of a Magistrate or independent witnesses who should be asked to satisfy themselves that the identification has been conducted under conditions precluding the possibility or collusion. Care must be taken that the identification by each witness is done out of sight and hearing of the other identifying witnesses.

Date and place of identification

Name of witness

Name of suspects he identifies

Description of manner in which the rule regulating such identification were complied with

Signature of Magistrate or other witnesses in whose presence the test is carried out

Signature of police officer-in-charge

1

2

3

4

5

6

Form No. 7.31 (1) (G)

Memorandum of Identification of suspects

Memorandum of identification proceedings of following accused conducted on at……….

Name, parentage and residence of the accused

Offence

Any distinctive marks likely to affect identification

Steps (if any) taken by the magistrate conducting the proceeding col. 3

Date of admission into the Jail (or on bail)

Name, parentage & residence of witness

Name or decription off the person who came to identify (in his own words)

Name of the accused correctly identified.

Wrong person pointed out (if any)

Observation of the witness or the accused

Magistrate’s remarks about demeanour of witness

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

The person/persons to be identified was/were mixed up with……….. other under trial prisoner/persons. All were made to stand in a circle. They were made to wear the clothes in which they were originally admitted to the jail (with the exception of the changes mentioned in column 4) No fetters were on. The accused were given the opinion to change place at will, but were not allowed either to conceal their faces or stature so as to impede recognition and to exchange their clothing. The witnesses were called in one by one and asked to single out person or persons they had come to identify and to mention the action for which they identified him or them. Every precaution was taken to ensure that no succeeding witness communicated in any manner with the preceding one. The result of the proceeding was as follows:-Remarks of the Magistrate who conducted the proceeding on the following points:-

    (1) Was the Superintendent of Jail informed at the time of the admission of the accused to the jail lock-up that his identification would be conducted later on.(2) Steps taken by the Jail Authorities to ensure the proper conduct of the proceedings.

3. Any other point.Dated ………19

Magistrate, I Class

N.B.-It is very useful to note whether the witness knew the name of the person he had come to identify or he only described him in some-such way as the man who was standing at the door at the time of the dacoity. The witness is not to be asked in a general way.”Identify whomsoever you know”

Form No. 7.32 (Ix)

Identification of property Held at………. in Crime

No ……..under section ……..of Police Station……….

District ………. In The Court of………

Magistrate ……….. Class on…….. 19………..

at ……..A.M./P.M.

Serial Number …………..I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX XName of accused from whom recovered………..Name of articles to be identified …………..Number of articles mixed ………..Any condition of the article which is likely to affect identification of proceedings……….Precautions taken regarding aboveNames of witnesses with parentage1. The property to be identified was brought by……… Court Moharrir/Police constable No………….. of my Court Police Station in sealed bundles (mention the receipt) from…….. The articles to be mixed up were brought by ……… in sealed bundles The Seats were intact and were opened before me. The witnesses were called one by one, every precaution was taken to ensure that no succeeding witness communicated in any manner with preceding one.2. The articles mixed up were similar in appearance to those for identification except in details given in remarks column.3. ……………. was present on behalf of prosecution……………was/were present on behalf of accused.

Magistrate …………

Date…………..

Form No. 8.1 (3)

Memorandum of Challan

In case F.I.R. No…………..

dated………….
Police Station

State VsSection.1. Whether all the papers and documents entered in the list given on the challan are properly attached to the challan?2. Are all the columns of challan form duly filled in? Note any mistake made in filling the form.3. Does the list of property entered in column No. 2 tally with the list given in Road Certificate? Note any discrepancies.4. Is the copy of Police Station file complete? Does it contain a copy of the F.I.R.? is the file properly prepared and signed by Station seal, etc.?5. Is the plan of spot prepared according to instructions i.e., whether the notes on it are entered by the investigating officer in red ink, and if these notes appear to be made correctly6. Are the sketches of the weapons of offence attached to the challan Do they bear the signatures of the preparing officer and the weight of the weapon?7. Is the list of stolen property attached to the challan? If so, does it bear the signatures of the complainant and the officer writing the list, with date?8. In murder and hurt cases whether the post mortem reports, inquest reports, statements of injuries, chemical Examiner’s and Imperial Serologist’s reports attached to the challan or not?9. Whether the list of properties, etc, recovered, produced or seized in the case are correctly Prepared dated and signed by witnesses and officer preparing them? Also whether the signatures of the witnesses of recovery who are entered in the challan appear on the lists?10. Were the accused’s search slips sent to Bureau and was any reply received? If so, what11. Are the identification certificates of the accused attached to challan?12. Which of the accused are previous? Give brief, note of their conviction with dates.13. Whether all the persons who were accused of committing the offence in the F.I.R. of First Case diary have been sent up for trial? Note if some of them are omitted or some new are added. Also note if the officer sending the challan has noted any reasons for doing so in the brief.14. Is the Police brief prepared according to instructions? Note defects (Paragraph………)15. Are all the eye or other necessary witnesses whose names were mentioned in F.I.R. entered in the challan? If not, are any reason given in brief for doing so.16. Note the dates on which the several accused were arrested.17. Were remands regularly taken and was the challan prepared in proper time?18. Whether all necessary evidence has been entered in the Challan? Note if there are any omissions.19. Whether the personal bonds and bail bonds of accused persons and the recognisance of all witnesses are attached to the challan or not? If they are attached, note if they are complete, and properly bind the accused and witnesses for attendance. If arrangements for producing witnesses along with the challan have not been made, are any reasons given in the challan for not doing so?20. Note in cases sent up for proceedings under section 519, Criminal Procedure Code, if the full description of the absconders and list of the property owned by them are attached to the challan. Whether separate report for obtaining the warrant of arrest of absconder was received, whether proceedings under section 87/88, Criminal Procedure Code, have been started.21. In cases of kidnapping and abduction note if the medical opinion and copies of birth register are attached with the challan.22. Whether the statements of prosecution witnesses were separately recorded under section 161/162, Criminal Procedure Code?23. By whom has the challan been prepared?24. Has any unnecessary delay been made in the course of investigation or in challaning the case?25. Other necessary facts, defects and omissions made in the investigation, etc, which require special notice or which necessitate some action. Particular care should be taken to see whether enquiry has been made regarding the connections of Prosecution Witnesses with the complainant and with the accused.26. A brief order issued or action taken on the challan.27. Final decision of the case with date.28. Note any undue delay made by court in dealing with the case. Instances in which witnesses were produced with the challan and were sent back unheard, delays in framing charges, hearing arguments or pronouncing judgments etc.29. If the case ends in discharge or acquittal, copy of the judgment should be attached with an opinion as to whether or not the case is a fit one for revision or an appeal.

Form No. 8.2 (1) (A)

Police Station………

District……..

Serial No. of charge sheet slip despatch register.Charge sheet slip to accompany charge sheet No.

(1) No. of First Information Report. (2) Date of Report.
(3) Value of property Stolen/Recovered. (4) Date of sending up for trial.
(5) Date of arrival in court.

Name of accused arrested, parentage, caste, residence, occupation, description and special marks of identification

Offence under which charged by the Police and place of occurrence

Date of arrest

Date of Transfer or escape

Offence which has been proved against the accused or in which he has been acquitted whether

Sentence, date of sentence, name of court and presiding officer with has powers, the district in which the trial was held and whether the case was tried summarily or otherwise

District serial No. of P.R. Slip (if any) as entered in P.R. Register

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Signature of the Magistrate

Form No. 8.7 (1)

Police Brief In Case under Section
First Information Report No.
Police StationPolice Station ………….

District …………….

1. Place of occurrence and its distance from the Police Station2. Date and time of occurrence.3. Date and time when F.I.R. was made at the Police Station, and explanation of delay, if any.4. Value of property stolen.5. Name of complainant, with explanation. If not the leading injured party.6. Name and parentage of accused and date of arrest, with explanation of delay in effecting arrest; also note whether mentioned in F.I.R. and if not when and how first mentioned.

(Fresh Page)

7. Concise statement of the case for the prosecution. (Fresh Page)8. List of witnesses, giving name, parentage and address. (Fresh Page)9. List of points tobe proved by the prosecution to establish the offence, with serial number of witness to prove each point.

(Fresh Page)

Points to be proved to establish the offence

Serial No. of witnesss

Abstract of statement of each witness as given in the Police file

Reference to case diaries relating to witness’s statement

Remarks.

1

2

3

4

5

10. List of exhibits together with the explanation of any delay in the recovery of any article.

(Fresh Page)

11. Probable line of defence with reasons of investigating officer for rejecting it and suggested line of rebuttal, (Note here reasons for omission of any accused or witnesses mentioned in F.I.R.)

(Fresh Page)

12. Proceeding in court.

Date of hearing

What is to be done this hearing

What has been done at this hearing

Remarks.

1

2

3

4

Proceedings in the Court of ……………. Magistrate ………… Class …………..

Date of hearing

What is to be done on this hearing

What has been done on this hearing

1

2

3

Form No. 8.8. (2)

Requisition For Particulars of Previous Convictions. 19

FromSuperintendentToSuperintendentDated
Received No.Sir,I request you will please furnish extract of previous convictions of the individual named within, certified under the hand of the Clerk of the Court or other officer having the custody of the original records, so that the said certified extract may be used as evidence under the provisions of section 511, Code of Criminal Procedure.I have, & C.,

Superintendent of Police

Name of accused
Father’s name
Residence.

Reverse
Description
Age
Description of offence with which now charged.
Clue to former conviction.

Superintendent of Police

Form No. 8.13 (V)

Name of Prosecuting Officer…….Daily Dairy of the Court of………for …

Daily Serial No.

Case fixed for this day (including fresh cases) with names of accused, offence, F.I.R. No. and name of Police Station.

Date of first hearing of case

Number of witneses summoned

Number of witnesses attended

Were all witnesses served? If not, give reasons for non-service of summons

Number of witnesses examined

Explanation of the case not taken up or if all the witnesses were not examined or if, in or fresh case witnesses were not present with the challan

What procedings were taken on this day?

Next date of hearing of cases

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Note:- 1. Each case shall be deal with separately, and when a fresh date of hearing is fixed, the Prosecuting Officer shall immediately enter up the case under the new date and give a reference to the place in the diary when the case last came up for hearing.Note:- 2. Entries in column 8 must be confined to facts, and care must be taken to avoid any criticism of a Magistrate.

Form No. 8.13 (Vi)-conclude

Details of Case Pending in Each Court

Serial No.

Court

Pending from last week cases Persons

Received during week Cases Persons

Received by transfer form courts Cases Persons

Convicted Cases Persons

Discharges or acquitted Cases Persons

Transfer to Court Cases Persons

Pending at close of week Cases Persons

Pending over one month Cases Persons

Pending over 3 Months Cases Persons

Pending over 6 Moths Cases persons

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Form No. 8.13 (VII)

Register of Judicial Expenses Bills

Serial No.

Date of accused

Name of police station submitting bill and other particulars

Diet of witness

Face of witness

Diet of accused

Fare of accused

Carriage expenses of property

Carriage of dead body

Feeding Charges of recovered cattle

Miscellaneous

Total

Authority sanctioning the bill

Date of handing over the bills to the Nazir for payment

Date of payment the Nazir

Signature of payee and date

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Form No. 8.14 (1)

Register of Warrants of Arrest and Search and of Summons received for Execution and Service by the Police.

Police Station……… District……………

No.

Name, caste, occupation and residence of person on whom the process is to be served

For what offence issued

Warrant or summons and for what purpose

By whom issued

Date of process

Date of hearing of case

Date of receipt of process by the Police Department

Date of endorsement and despatch and name of Police Officer to whom endorsed

Date execution of process

Date of return to Court

Remarks.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Form No. 8.14 (2)

Police Station……… District………

Register of Intermediate Orders in Cases

No.

Complainant

Accused

Criminal Court

Offence with No. and date of First Information Report and name of Police Station

Intermediate Order

Final Order

Remarks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Form No. 8.14 (3)

Police Station………….. District…………….

Register of Persons on Security to be of Good Behaviour, the Names of Sureties, etc.

Serial No.

Name, father’s name and caste of person required to find security

Residence

Amount of security and of personal recognizance

Names, father’s names and caste of sureties

Residence of sureties

Name of court which passed the order to find security, name of presiding officer, powers of the court, district in which order was passed and date of order.

Inprisonment in default of Security

Date of Expiry of Period of Security Date and Month of any case in which

Reference to First Information Report of papers in a person on security was convicted and bond became liable to forfeiture

Reference to paper appertaining to proceedings taken to obtain forfeiture of security and result of such proceedings.

(a) Date of going to of prison
(b) Date of release
19
19
19
19

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Form No. 8.14 (4)

Police Station……… ………… District……….

Register of Excise Cases Occurring During the Year 19.

In which Police Officers have been Directly Concerned

Serial No.

Name of Police Station

Date of report

Description of offence committed with section of Excise or Opium Act and No. and date of First Information Report, if any.

Nature of action taken by the police (e.g., accused arrested illicit spirits detained report made to Excise Officer or as the case may be)

Name and renk of officer by whom action referred to in column 5 was taken

Final result of case

Amount of reward if any sanctioned for the police in the case

Remarks.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Form No. 8.18 (2)

Order

Summons from the Court of the for the production at of the office files relating to the

(a) I direct ……….. to appear with the files mentioned in the summons a brief description of which is given below and to claim privilege for them under section 123 of the Evidence Act.

(b) Having examined the documents mentioned in the summons. I withhold permission to give any evidence derived from the files for which privilege is claimed under this order.

It should be represented to the Court that these files contain unpublished official records relating to affairs of State for the purpose of section 123 and that, in view of the provisions of section 162 of the Evidence Act, the files are not open to the inspection of the Court.

Inspector General of Police.
The.

Dated.Here insert a brief description of the nature of the documents summoned together with the reasons for claiming privilege, for example, the document is a record of a C.I.D. Officer making a secret inquiry into a case fraud and it is undesirable in the interest of the inquiry that its contents should be disclosed.

Form No. 8.25 (1)

Receipt and Despatch Register of Charge Sheet Slips and Conviction Slips Referring to Cases Included Under Rule 7.23

Annual Serial No. of Charge Sheet slips or conviction slips received from other districts or from magistrates

Date of receipt with name of the district

Name of police station, offence with section and No. of First Information Report

1

2

3

Disposal of charge Sheet slip

Date of despatch to police Station sending up the accused for trial

Date of return from the Police Station sending up the accused for trial

Name, parentage and caste of the convict

4

5

6

Residence

Disposal of Conviction Slips

Village

Police Station

District

Date of despatch to the district or Police Station in which the convict resides

Date of return from the district of Police Station in which the convict resides.

7

8

9

10

11

Number of entry in register No. 7 Part VI of the police station in which the conviction is entered

Date of return of conviction slip to district from which received (The column will only be filled in where conviction slips are received from other districts.

Remarks

12

13

14

Form No. 8.26

Police Station………………………… District…………..

Conviction Slip of a Person Convicted in the Above District Who is Supposed to Reside in the Police Station of District

Serial No. of charge sheet slip despatch register.1. F.I.R. Report No……… of Police Station.2. Name…….. , son of ………., alias …….3. Caste…….4. Occupation ………..5. Description ……. age ……Height……..Particular marks as shown in charge sheet.6. Resident of village …… Police Station …… District …….7. Brief account of offence with section and of law under which conviction was obtained and place of offence.8. Sentence

(i) Date of sentence.

(ii) Court of.

(iii) Name of presiding officer.

(iv) District in which trial was held.

(v) Was case tried summarily or otherwise?

9. District Serial No. of P.R. Slip with descriptive roll as shown therein.10. Remarks.You are requested to return this statement in the event of its being discovered that the convicted person does not commonly reside in your police station or district.

Superintendent of Police.

Date……
The……………. 19….Date of entry in the conviction register of the police station, with the signature of Clerk, Head Constable and the Serial No. of the entry.

Form No. 8.29

Police Station………… …………….. District………………

Cognizable Cases Reported at a Police Station for The year 19

Annual Serial No. of cases reported

Police Station No. and date of First Information Report

Date and Place of occurrence

1

2

3

Complainant

Section of Indian Penal Code or law offended against

Name and parentage

Residence

5

6

7

Accused

Name

Parentage

Caste and occupation

Residence

Age

7

8

9

10

11

Cases

In which investigation was refused

Number of cases proved as false by the Magistrate or declared false

Number of cases in which a mistake of law or fact occurred or declared non-cognizable by a Magistrate

Ending in Conviction

12

13

14

15

True Cases

Ending in discharge or acquittal

Not detected or appreh ended (cases in column 12 will not be shown)

Total of true cases (column 12+15+16+17+)

16

17

18

Persons

Person in custody or on bail under section 170, Criminal Procedure Code, at beginning of the year

Arrested by the police during the year

Persons released under Section 169, Criminal Procedure Code

Persons sent for trial

19

20

21

22

Number Convicted

Number acquitted or discharged

Persons who had not been arrested at the end of year (only persons for whom warrants have been issued during the year will be included

23

24

25

Property

Amount of Property Stolen

Amount of Property Recovered in Rupees

Reference to the entries in Register of Cognizable offences

Remarks

in Rupees

26

27

28

29

List of S.R. Cases For Police Station

S. No.

List of S.R. Cases

Office whom the report is to be sent

1

2

3

Chapter VIII

1.

Riots to religious or political, Communal of agrarian causes or ill feeling between Sects or individuals likely to lead to communal troubles or riots involving death.

S.P.

2.

Cases of firing on mobs or individuals by the Police

-do-

3.

Cases involving use of force or violence by police to quellriots or on rioteous mob.

-do-

Chapter IX

4.

Cases U/s. 161/165, IPC and U/s 5 of Prevention of Corruption Act Cognate and other offences.

-do-

Chapter XI

5.

Escape from police or Jail Custody.

-do-

Chapter XII

6.

Manufacture of conterfeit coins and Government stamps

-do-

Chapter XII

7.

Murder.

-do-

8.

Encounter with out-laws by Police and RAC.

-do-

9.

Satti Cases and attempts for the same.

P.S.

10.

Poisoning

-do-

11.

Torture by police.

-do-

12.

Assault on Government Servants on duty.

-do-

13.

Cases of kidnapping and abduction for ransom or political purpose and kidnapping for begging.

-do-

Chapter XVII

14.

Theft or damage of State Government or Union Government property.

-do-

15.

Theft of Telegraph or telephone wires.

-do-

16.

Robbery.

-do-

17.

Dacoity.

-do-

18.

Defalcation or Embezzlement of Public Money including Theft of Notes or Hundies.

-do-

19.

Burglaries and Theft involving property worth Rs. 2000/- or more, in the case of non-municipal area and Rs. 4000/- in the case of minicipal area.

-do-

20.

Theft or loss of fire arms or explosives

-do-

21.

Forging of Currency Notes 489A to 489E.

-do-

General
Railway Crime

22.

Murder, Rape, Robbery in Railway trains.

S.P. Also Station Master

23.

Railway theft involving property worth Rs. 2000/- or above.

-do-

24.

Cases of tempering with rails

-do-

Other Acts

25.

Air Crafts or serious railway or bus accidents.

Also to nearest authority concerned and transport authority.

26.

Desertion of police and RAC with fire-arms

S.P.

27.

Recovery of pirate Wireless Sets.

-do-

28.

Industrial strikes or hunger strikes or strikes by body of persons.

-do-

29.

Agrarian unrest likely to cause disturbance.

-do-

30.

Important happenings which are of interest to Government and public.

-do-

31.

All Indo-Pak Border incidents and incursions by Pak Police or Military.

-do-

32.

Death of Prisoners in police custody.

-do-

33.

Arrest or surrender of dacoits.

-do-

34.

Calamities such of floods or earthquakes which cause serious damage to life or property.

-do-

35.

Any offence whether trivial or serious committed by a member of organised gang of dacoits.

-do-

List of Cases in which S.R. are to be sent by the S.S.P.

S. No.

List of S.R. Cases

Others to whom sent

1

2

3

Chapter VIII

1.

Riots involving loss life and serious breach of peace or agrarian (means those agrarian resulting in murder organised of instigated by political parties) communal, religious or political.

D.I.G.P. Range

C.I.G.P. C.I.D.

Government

D.M.

2.

Cases of firing by police on civilians or mob and use of force to disperse unlawful assembly of rioteous mob.

-do-

-do-

-do-

-do-

Chapter IX

3.

Offence Under section 161/165, IPC Sec 5, prevention of corruption Act 1. See Now Section of Prevention of Corruption Act, 1988. and other Cognate offences

-do-

Additional I.G.P.

and D.M.

Concerned Deptt.

4.

Escape of prisioners from police & Jail custody

D.I.G.P. Range

D.I.G. C.I.D. and Government

Dm.

(notorious out laws only

Chapter XII

5.

Counter feiting of coins and forging of stamps and G.C. Notes.

-do-

D.I.G.P. C.I.D.

and D.M.

Chapter XVI

6.

Encounter with out-laws by police or R.A.C.

-do-

D.I.G.P. C.I.D.

Government for political & Communal reasons only

D.M and Deptt. Concerned

7.

Encounter with out-laws by police or R.A.C.

D.I.G. Range

D.I.G., CID.

Government (with notorious out-laws only)

and D.M.

8.

Safti cases or attempt for the same.

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

9.

Cases of torture by police.

D.I.G. Range

D.I.G., C.I.D.

and D.M.

10.

Assault on Government servant on duty.

-do-
(all assaults)

-do-
(all assaults on police)

Government (on and D.M. V.I.Ps. and Government servant assaults on other drawing pay Govt. Servants of Rs. 500/- or above.

11.

Cases of Kidnapping or abduction for ransom or political purpose and kidnapping for begging.

D.I.G.P, Range

D.I.G.P. C.I.D.

Government (for and D.M. ransom by notorious out-law only).

Chapter XVIII

12.

Loss or theft of fire-arms including revolvers and pistols but not M.L. Guns and country made Tamanchas.

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

13.

Theft of telephone and telegraph wires.

D.I.G.P. Range

D.I.G.P. C.I.D.

and D.M.

14.

Robbery-
(a) Involving Rs. 10,000/- or over or by person armed with breach-loading fire arms, pistols or revolvers explosive or by organised gangs armed with fire-arms or mail robbery or professional highwy robbery.

-do-

-do-

Government (by organised gangs armed with fire-arms with breach finding fire-arms pistols revolvers or explosives or Mail robberies or professional highway robbery.)

and D.M.

15.

Air crafts or serious railway accident.

D.I.G.P, Range

D.I.G.P. C.I.D

D.M.. government

and D.M.

16.

Desertion of Police and R.A.C. With firearms.

17.

Recovery of pirate wireless sets.

and D.M.

18.

Important industrial strikes or hunger strikes by body of persons.

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

19.

Incidents likely to result or resulting in serious communal trouble.

-do-

-do-

Government

and D.M.

20.

Hunger strikes likely to result in tension amongst the public and disturbance of public peace.

-do-

-do-

-do-

-do-

21.

All Indo-Pak border incidents including Pak incursions

(a) (serious border incident by quickest means,
(b) efforts made for recoveries and restoration in serious and minor incidents both to Govt. and Ministry of External Affairs,

22.

Death of Prisoner in police custody.

D.I.G.P/.Range.,

D.I.G.P. C.I.D.

and D.M.

23.

Arrest or surrender of dacoits.

-do-

-do-

-do-

24.

Any offence whether trival or serious committed by a member of organised gang of dacoits.

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

25.

All dacoities.

-do-

-do-

Government (only by organised gangs and with fire-arms).

and D.M.

26.

Embezzlement cases of public money involving Rs. 20/- or more

-do-

-do-

Government (Finance Deptt. Only).

and D.M.

27.

Burglaries involving property worth Rs. 10, 000 or above in Municipal area and Rs. 5000/- or above in non municipal area.

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

28.

Railways crime-
Railway theft involving property worth Rs. 2000/- and over.

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

29.

Cases of tempering with rails.

D.I.G.P.

D.I.G. C.I.C.

and D.M.

30.

Murder, rape, robbery in the Railway train.

-do-

-do-

Government (mail robeery only) Govt.

and D.M.

31.

Calamities such as floods or earthquakes

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

32.

Incidents likely to resulting in disturbance public tranquility

-do-

-do-

and D.M.

33.

Any serious crime in the district which has wides pread repurcussions amongst the public and is likely to disturb faith of the general public in the capability of the local administration to administer the affairs of the Government.

Circular Order No. 6 dated 16th November, 1983 issued by the Dy. I.G. of Police (H.Qrs.) Rajasthan Jaipur

The Circular is related to Rajasthan Police Rules, 1965, Rule No. 3.35.

Registers to be Maintained at Police Station Office of the Director General of Police, Rajasthan Jaipur.

Circular Order No. 6/83

Dated 16.11.1983

No./V.15(20) Addl. IGP-Trg/Gen/83/14437Sub.: Record to be maintained at Police Stations in Rajasthan.In supersession of all existing instructions on the subject, the following Registers, lists and files will be maintained at all Police Stations in Rajasthan with immediate effect:-

Registers to be maintained at Police Station

A.

Crime Record

R.P.

1.

General Diary (Roznamacha)

61

2.

F.I.R.

63

3.

Case Diary

67

4.

Crime Register

65

5.

Malkhana Register

6.

Gang Register

129

7.

Register of Property stolen and recovered

60

8.

Index register of convicts & suspects

92

9.

Index register to personal files, History sheets and persons under surveillance

80

10.

Register of wanted persons:-
A. Proclaimed offenders
B. Military Deserters
C. Persons wanted in cases not traced but suspected

11.

Index register of persons arrested:-
A. Persons
B. Information sent to court regarding arrested persons

54

12.

Register of MOB, Computer, Enquiry Slip

13.

Register of FIR under section 174 Criminal Procedure Code (Un-natural death)

14.

Register for missing
A. Persons
B. Animals
C. Other articles

15.

Register of non-cognizable offences, complaints and preventive action:-
A. Motor Vehicle Act
34 Police Act
3/4 Gambling Ordinance
Miscellaneous
B. 182/211 Indian Penal Code

96

133 Criminal Procedure Code
C. 107, 107/151, 145, 109/78, 110/79, 77
D. H.O. Act

16.

Village Crime Note Book

87, 88, 89

17.

Confidential Note Book of S.H.O.

18.

Register of pending trial cases

B.

Office Record

1.

Summon & warrants Register

14

2.

Receipt Register

15

3.

Despatch Register

4.

Cash Book

5.

Service Postage Register

6.

Foreigners Register

7.

Complaint Register

8.

Trunk call Register

9.

Casual Leave Register

10.

Encashment Register

11.

Attendance Register

12.

Inspection Register

13.

Government Property Register

43

14.

Register of Arms Licences:-
(a) Small arms (Revolver, Pistols)
(b) Breach Loading Guns (Rifles etc.)
(c) Muzzle Loading Guns

15.

Character Verfication Register

16.

Register of recovery of fine

50

17.

Register of Demi-Official letters received and sent

C.

Files To Be Maintained At The Police Station

1

Standing orders, circulars & instructions (Permanent)

2

All letters and orders originating from higher authorities Govt. & P.H.Q.

3

All letters, orders, circulars, originating from Range Office, Office of SP.

4

Miscellaneous correspondence

5

Enquiry Slip
A

81

B

132

6

Inspection file

7

Charge sheet

69

8

F.R.

70

9

Remand sheet file

10

Imprest file

11

Weekly intelligence report

12

Search Slip

105

13

Safin’s issued for witnesses

107

D.

List to be Maintained at Police Station

1.

List of prescribed Registers

2.

List of periodical returns and reports

3.

List of Villages

4.

List of Magistrates, Medical Officers empowered to hold Inquest, Postmortem examination with places of residence

5.

List of licencsed retail shops liquor, opiums, drugs

6.

List of licenced Arms and ammunition dealers

7.

List of towns in the jurisdiction where section 34 Police Act, 1861 is operative

8.

List of Sarai, Dharmshalas, Hotels & Restaurants

9.

List of festivals, Melas, Hats.

10.

List of dispensaries, hospitals & Ayurvedic aushdhalayas

11.

List of important telephone numbers

12.

List of Posting of staff, Rankwise

13.

List of special report cases

14.

List of special report cases

15.

List of M.Ps., M.L.A., Zila Pramukh and Sarpanchs

16.

List of Political organisations with detail of the office bearers.

Dy. I.G. of Police (H.Qrs.)
Rajasthan, Jaipur