Royal Marriages Act 1772

United Kingdom

Most Gracious Sovereign,

I. Whereas your Majesty, from your paternal affection to your own family, and from your royal concern for the future welfare of your people, and the honour and dignity of your crown, was graciously pleased to recommend to your parliament to take into serious consideration, whether it might not be wise and expedient to supply the defect of the laws now in being; and, by some new provision, more effectually to guard the descendants of His late majesty King George the Second, (other than the issue of princesses who have married, or may hereafter marry, into foreign families) from marrying without the approbation of your Majesty, your heirs, or successors, first had and obtained; we have taken this weighty matter into our serious consideration;

Continue Reading

Nineteen Propositions 1642

United Kingdom

Parliament of England

Your Majesty’s most humble and faithful subjects, the Lords and Commons in Parliament, having nothing in their thoughts and desires more precious and of higher esteem (next to the honour and immediate service of God) than the just and faithful performance of their duty to your Majesty and this kingdom: and being very sensible of the great distractions and distempers, and of the imminent dangers and calamities which those distractions and distempers are like to bring upon your Majesty and your subjects; all which have proceeded from the subtile insinuations, mischievous practices and evil counsels of men disaffected to God’s true religion, your Majesty’s honour and safety, and the pablic peace and prosperity of your people, after a serious observation of the causes of those mischiefs, do in all humility and sincerity present to your Majesty their most dutiful petition and advice, that out of your princely wisdom for the establishing your own honour and safety, and gracious tenderness of the welfare and security of your subjects and dominions, you will be pleased to grant and accept these their humble desires and propositions, as the most necessary effectual means, through God’s blessing, of removing those jealousies and differences which have unhappily fallen betwixt you and your people, and procuring both your Majesty and them a constant course of honour, peace, and happiness.

Continue Reading

The Socialist Party of Great Britain: Manifesto 1905

United Kingdom

Manifesto of The Socialist Party of Great Britain

(June 12th 1905)

Fellow Members of the Working-Class,

In bringing to your notice the aims and methods of The Socialist Party of Great Britain, and in order that the reason for the existence of the Party may be clearly understood, it will be necessary to give a short survey of the position of our class under existing society, and a sketch of the historical development which has resulted in present conditions.

Continue Reading

Act of Settlement 1701

United Kingdom

The Act of Settlement 1701

12 & 13 William III, c. 2 (England)

An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject

[Assented to 1701.]

Recital of Bill of Rights 1689, Section 2, and that the late Queen and Duke of Gloucester are dead; and that His Majesty had recommended from the Throne a further Provision for the Succession of the Crown in the Protestant Line. The Princess Sophia, Electress and Duchess Dowager of Hanover, Daughter of the late Queen of Bohemia, Daughter of King James the First, to inherit after the King and the Princess Anne, in Default of Issue of the said Princess and His Majesty, respectively and the Heirs of her Body, being Protestants.

Continue Reading

Demise of the Crown Act 1702

Demise of the Crown Act 1702 (1702)

1702 CHAPTER 2 1 Ann

An Act for explaining a Clause in an Act made at the Parliament begun and holden at Westminster the Two and twentieth of November in the Seventh Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord King William the Third intituled An Act for the better Security of His Majesties Royal Person and Government

Recital of Stat.7 & 8 W.III. c. 27. § 20.

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made at the Parliament begun and holden at Westminster the Two and twentieth Day of November in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King William the Third intituled An Act for the better Security of His Majesties Royal Person and Government. It was among other Things enacted That no Commission either Civil or Military should cease determine or be void by reason of the Death or Demise of His said Majesty or of any of His Heirs or Successors Kings or Queens of this Realm but that every such Commission should be continue and remain in full force and vertue for the space of Six Months next after any such Death or Demise unless in the mean time superseded determined or made void by the next and immediate Successor to whom the Imperial Crown of this Realm according to the Act of Settlement in the same recited Act mentioned is limited and appointed to go remain or descend And forasmuch as some Doubt may be concieved concerning the extent of that Clause therefore for the avoiding of any Dispute or Question that may arise concerning the Construction thereof.

Continue Reading

The Health Protection (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020

United Kingdom

UK legislation 

Regulations made by the Secretary of State, laid before Parliament under section 45R of the Public Health (Control of Disease) Act 1984 (c.22), for approval by resolution of each House of Parliament within twenty-eight days beginning with the day on which the instrument is made, subject to extension for periods of dissolution, prorogation or adjournment for more than four days.

STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS

2020 No. 129

PUBLIC HEALTH, ENGLAND

The Health Protection (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020

Madeat 6.50 a.m. on 10th February 2020

Laid before Parliamentat 2.30 p.m. on 10th February 2020

Coming into force in accordance with article 1(1)

Continue Reading

Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996 (section 23(1)) Code of Practice-UK

United Kingdom

Code of Practice u/s 23(1) Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996 

This code of practice applies in respect of criminal investigations conducted by police officers which begin on or after the day on which this code comes into effect. Persons other than police officers who are charged with the duty of conducting an investigation as defined in the Act are to have regard to the relevant provisions of the code, and should take these into account in applying their own operating procedures.

Revised in accordance with section 25(4) of the Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996

March 2015


Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996

Updated March 2020

23  Code of practice.

(1)The Secretary of State shall prepare a code of practice containing provisions designed to secure—

(a)that where a criminal investigation is conducted all reasonable steps are taken for the purposes of the investigation and, in particular, all reasonable lines of inquiry are pursued;

(b)that information which is obtained in the course of a criminal investigation and may be relevant to the investigation is recorded;

(c)that any record of such information is retained;

(d)that any other material which is obtained in the course of a criminal investigation and may be relevant to the investigation is retained;

(e)that information falling within paragraph (b) and material falling within paragraph

(d) is revealed to a person who is involved in the prosecution of criminal proceedings arising out of or relating to the investigation and who is identified in accordance with prescribed provisions;

(f)that where such a person inspects information or other material in pursuance of a requirement that it be revealed to him, and he requests that it be disclosed to the accused, the accused is allowed to inspect it or is given a copy of it;

(g)that where such a person is given a document indicating the nature of information or other material in pursuance of a requirement that it be revealed to him, and he requests that it be disclosed to the accused, the accused is allowed to inspect it or is given a copy of it;

(h)that the person who is to allow the accused to inspect information or other material or to give him a copy of it shall decide which of those (inspecting or giving a copy) is appropriate;

(i)that where the accused is allowed to inspect material as mentioned in paragraph (f) or

(g) and he requests a copy, he is given one unless the person allowing the inspection is of opinion that it is not practicable or not desirable to give him one;

(j)that a person mentioned in paragraph (e) is given a written statement that prescribed activities which the code requires have been carried out.

(2)The code may include provision—

(a)that a police officer identified in accordance with prescribed provisions must carry out a prescribed activity which the code requires;
(b)that a police officer so identified must take steps to secure the carrying out by a person (whether or not a police officer) of a prescribed activity which the code requires;
(c)that a duty must be discharged by different people in succession in prescribed circumstances (as where a person dies or retires).

(3)The code may include provision about the form in which information is to be recorded.

(4)The code may include provision about the manner in which and the period for which—
(a)a record of information is to be retained, and
(b)any other material is to be retained;and if a person is charged with an offence the period may extend beyond a conviction or an acquittal.

(5)The code may include provision about the time when, the form in which, the way in which, and the extent to which, information or any other material is to be revealed to the person mentioned in subsection (1)(e).

[(6)The code must be so framed that it does not apply to any of the following—
(a)material intercepted in obedience to a warrant issued under section 2 of the Interception of Communications Act 1985;
(b)material intercepted under the authority of an interception warrant under section 5 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000;
(c)material obtained under the authority of a warrant issued under Chapter 1 of Part 2 of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016;
(d)material obtained under the authority of a warrant issued under Chapter 1 of Part 6 of that Act.]

(7)The code may—

(a)make different provision in relation to different cases or descriptions of case;
(b)contain exceptions as regards prescribed cases or descriptions of case.

(8)In this section “prescribed” means prescribed by the code.


Contents

Preamble

1. Introduction
2. Definitions
3. General responsibilities
4. Recording of information
5. Retention of material
(a) Duty to retain material
(b) Length of time for which material is to be retained.
6. Preparation of material for prosecutor
(a) Introduction
(b) Magistrates’ Court
(c) Crown Court
(d) Sensitive material – Crown Court
7. Revelation of material to prosecutor
8. Subsequent action by disclosure officer
9. Certification by disclosure officer
10. Disclosure of material to accused
Annex


Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996 (section 23(1))

Continue Reading

Sri Lanka Independence Act 1947 

United Kingdom

UK Legislation

 10 December 1947

The Ceylon Independence Act, 1947

(title changed after Act was passed)

(11 Geo. VI, c. 7)

An Act to make provision for, and in connexion with, the attainment by Ceylon of fully responsible status within the British Commonwealth of Nations

BE it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the autho­ rity of the same, as follows–

1. (1) No Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed on or after the appointed day shall extend, or be deemed to extend, to Ceylon as part of the law of Ceylon, unless it is expressly declared in that Act that Ceylon has requested, and consented to, the enact­ ment thereof.

(2) As from the appointed day His Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom shall have no responsibility for the government of Ceylon.

(3) As from the appointed day the provisions of the First Schedule to this Act shall have effect with respect to the legislative powers of Ceylon.

2. As from the appointed day Ceylon shall be included in the definition of ‘Dominion’ in paragraph (23) of section one hundred and ninety of the Army Act and of the Air Force Act (which sec­ tion, in each Act, relates generally to the interpretation of the Act), and accordingly in the said paragraph (23), in each Act, for the words ‘and Newfoundland’ there shall be substituted the words ‘Newfoundland and Ceylon’

3 (1) No court in Ceylon shall, by virtue of the Indian and Colonial Divorce Jurisdiction Acts, 1926 and 1940, have jurisdiction in or in relation to any proceedings for a decree for the dissolution of a marriage, unless those proceedings were instituted before the appointed day, but, save as aforesaid and subject to any provision to the contrary which may hereafter be made by any Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom or of Ceylon, all courts in Ceylon shall have the same jurisdiction under the said Acts as they would have had if this Act had not been passed.

(2) Any rules made on or after the appointed day under subsection (4) of section one of the Indian and Colonial Divorce Jurisdiction Act, 1926, for a court in Ceylon shall, instead of being made by the Secretary of State with the concurrence of the Lord Chancellor, be made by such authority as may be determined by the law of Ceylon, and so much of the said subsection and of any rules in force thereunder immediately before the appointed day as requires the approval of the Lord Chancellor to the nomination for any purpose of any judges of any such court shall cease to have effect.

(3) The references in subsection (1) of this section to proceedings for a decree for the dissolution of a marriage include references to proceedings for such a decree of presumption of death and dissolution of a marriage as is authorized by section eight of the Matrimonial Causes Act, 1937.


originally called The Ceylon Independence Act, 1947

The Family Procedure Rules 2010- UK

United Kingdom

The Family Procedure Rules 2010 (‘the FPR 2010’) come into force on 6th April 2011.The purpose of this practice direction is to inform court users of the practice directions relating (only) to family proceedings which date from before 6th April 2011 (‘existing Practice Directions’) but will continue to apply after that date.

Practice Direction – Practice Directions Relating to Family Proceedings in Force before 6th April 2011 which Support the Family Procedure Rules 2010

Part 1 – Overriding Objective
Part 2 – Application and Interpretation of the Rules
Practice Direction 2A – Functions of the Court in the Family Procedure Rules 2010 and Practice Directions which may be performed by a single lay justice
Practice Direction 2B – References in the Rules to Actions Done by the Court or by a Court Officer
Part 3 – Non-court Dispute Resolution
Part 3A – Vulnerable persons participation in proceedings and giving evidence
Practice Direction 3A – Family Mediation Information and Assessment Meetings (MIAMS)
Practice Direction 3AA – Vulnerable persons: participation in proceedings and giving evidence
Part 4 – General Case Management Powers
Practice Direction 4A – Striking Out a Statement of Case
Practice Direction 4B – Civil Restraint Orders
Part 5 – Forms and Start of Proceedings
Practice Direction 5A – Forms

Continue Reading

Crown courts-UK

Crown courts hear serious indictable offences such as robbery, rape and murder. A judge has overall responsibility for the court with a jury of twelve people providing the verdict. They also hear referrals for sentencing and appeals from lower courts.

There are approximately 90 Crown courts around England and Wales and they include the Central Criminal Court in the City of London, popularly known as the Old Bailey. Liverpool and Manchester Crown courts are anomalies. They were established in 1956 following recommendations that they would combat a rise in crime in these areas. These new courts took responsibility for the quarter sessions work as well as criminal assize work for south Lancashire. The assizes work for the west Derby area was assigned to Liverpool and the assizes work of Salford was assigned to Manchester.

Continue Reading