It reads as under:

10 (2) Court may strike out or add parties -The Court may at any stage of the proceedings, either upon or without the application of either party, and on such terms as may appear to the Court to be just, order that the name of any party improperly joined, whether as Plaintiff or Defendant, be struck out, and that the name, of any person who ought to have been joined, whether as Plaintiff or Defendant, or whose presence before the Court may be necessary in order to enable the Court effectually and completely to adjudicate upon and settle all the questions involved in the suit, be added.

 In Ramesh Hirachand Kundanmal Vs. Municipal Corporation of Greater Bombay and Others, , this Court interpreted the aforesaid provision and held:

Sub-rule (2) of Rule 10 gives a wide discretion to the Court to meet every case of defect of parties and is not affected by the inaction of the Plaintiff to bring the necessary parties on record. The question of impleadment of a party has to be decided on the touchstone of Order 1 Rule 10 which provides that only a necessary or a proper party may be added. A necessary party is one without whom no order can be made effectively. A proper party is one in whose absence an effective order can be made but whose presence is necessary for a complete and final decision on the question involved in the proceeding. The addition of parties is generally not a question of initial jurisdiction of the Court but of a judicial discretion which has to be exercised in view of all the facts and circumstances of a particular case.

(emphasis supplied)

 In Anil Kumar Singh Vs. Shivnath Mishra alias Gadasa Guru, this Court interpreted Order 1 Rule 10(2) in the following manner:

By operation of the above-quoted rule though the court may have power to strike out the name of a party improperly joined or add a party either on application or without application of either party, but the condition precedent is that the court must be satisfied that the presence of the party to be added, would be necessary in order to enable the court to effectually and completely adjudicate upon and settle all questions involved in the suit. To bring a person as party-defendant is not a substantive right but one of procedure and the court has discretion in its proper exercise. The object of the rule is to bring on record all the persons who are parties to the dispute relating to the subject-matter so that the dispute may be determined in their presence at the same time without any protraction, inconvenience and to avoid multiplicity of proceedings.

In Mumbai International Airport (P) Ltd. v. Regency Convention Centre and Hotels (P) Ltd. (supra), this Court considered the scope of Order 1 Rule 10(2) CPC and observed:

The general rule in regard to impleadment of parties is that the Plaintiff in a suit, being dominus litis, may choose the persons against whom he wishes to litigate and cannot be compelled to sue a person against whom he does not seek any relief. Consequently, a person who is not a party has no right to be impleaded against the wishes of the plaintiff. But this general rule is subject to the provisions of Order 1 Rule 10(2) of the CPC (‘the Code’, for short), which provides for impleadment of proper or necessary parties. The said sub-rule is extracted below:

10. (2) Court may strike out or add parties. ‘The court may at any stage of the proceedings, either upon or without the application of either party, and on such terms as may appear to the court to be just, order that the name of any party improperly joined, whether as plaintiff or defendant, be struck out, and that the name of any person who ought to have been joined, whether as plaintiff or defendant, or whose presence before the court may be necessary in order to enable the court effectually and completely to adjudicate upon and settle all the questions involved in the suit, be added.

The said provision makes it clear that a court may, at any stage of the proceedings (including suits for specific performance), either upon or even without any application, and on such terms as may appear to it to be just, direct that any of the following persons may be added as a party: ( a ) any person who ought to have been joined as plaintiff or defendant, but not added; or ( b ) any person whose presence before the court may be necessary in order to enable the court to effectively and completely adjudicate upon and settle the questions involved in the suit. In short, the court is given the discretion to add as a party, any person who is found to be a necessary party or proper party.

A “necessary party” is a person who ought to have been joined as a party and in whose absence no effective decree could be passed at all by the court. If a “necessary party” is not impleaded, the suit itself is liable to be dismissed. A “proper party” is a party who, though not a necessary party, is a person whose presence would enable the court to completely, effectively and adequately adjudicate upon all matters in dispute in the suit, though he need not be a person in favour of or against whom the decree is to be made. If a person is not found to be a proper or necessary party, the court has no jurisdiction to implead him, against the wishes of the Plaintiff. The fact that a person is likely to secure aright/interest in a suit property, after the suit is decided against the Plaintiff, will not make such person a necessary party or a proper party to the suit for specific performance.

Let us consider the scope and ambit of Order 1 Rule 10(2) CPC regarding striking out or adding parties. The said sub-rule is not about the right of a non-party to be impleaded as a party, but about the judicial discretion of the court to strike out or add parties at any stage of a proceeding. The discretion under the sub-rule can be exercised either suo motu or on the application of the Plaintiff or the Defendant, or on an application of a person who is not a party to the suit. The court can strike out any party who is improperly joined. The court can add anyone as a Plaintiff or as a Defendant if it finds that he is a necessary party or proper party. Such deletion or addition can be without any conditions or subject to such terms as the court deems fit to impose. In exercising its judicial discretion under Order 1 Rule 10(2) of the Code, the court will of course act according to reason and fair play and not according to whims and caprice.’

(emphasis supplied)

In Kasturi v. Iyyamperumal (supra), this Court considered the question whether a person who sets up independent title and claims possession of the suit property is entitled to be impleaded as party to a suit for specific performance of contract entered into between the Plaintiff and the Defendant. In that case, the trial Court allowed the application for impleadment on the ground that respondent Nos. 1 and 4 to 11 were claiming title and possession of the contracted property and, therefore, they will be deemed to have direct interest in the subject matter of the suit. The High Court dismissed the revision filed by the appellant and confirmed the order of the trial Court. While allowing the appeal and setting aside the orders of the trial Court and the High Court, this Court referred to Order 1 Rule 10(2) CPC and observed:

In our view, a bare reading of this provision, namely, second part of Order 1 Rule 10 Sub-rule (2) CPC would clearly show that the necessary parties in a suit for specific performance of a contract for sale are the parties to the contract or if they are dead, their legal representatives as also a person who had purchased the contracted property from the vendor. In equity as well as in law, the contract constitutes rights and also regulates the liabilities of the parties. A purchaser is a necessary party as he would be affected if he had purchased with or without notice of the contract, but a person who claims adversely to the claim of a vendor is, however, not a necessary party. From the above, it is now clear that two tests are to be satisfied for determining the question who is a necessary party. Tests are – (1) there must be a right to some relief against such party in respect of the controversies involved in the proceedings; (2) no effective decree can be passed in the absence of such party.

As noted herein earlier, two tests are required to be satisfied to determine the question who is a necessary party, let us now consider who is a proper party in a suit for specific performance of a contract for sale. For deciding the question who is a proper party in a suit for specific performance the guiding principle is that the presence of such a party is necessary to adjudicate the controversies involved in the suit for specific performance of the contract for sale. Thus, the question is to be decided keeping in mind the scope of the suit. The question that is to be decided in a suit for specific performance of the contract for sale is to the enforceability of the contract entered into between the parties to the contract. If the person seeking addition is added in such a suit, the scope of the suit for specific performance would be enlarged and it would be practically converted into a suit for title. Therefore, for effective adjudication of the controversies involved in the suit, presence of such parties cannot be said to be necessary at all. Lord Chancellor Cottenham in Tasker v. Small made the following observations:

It is not disputed that, generally, to a bill for a specific performance of a contract of sale, the parties to the contract only are the proper parties; and, when the ground of the jurisdiction of Courts of Equity in suits of that kind is considered it could not properly be otherwise. The Court assumes jurisdiction in such cases, because a court of law, giving damages only for the non-performance of the contract, in many cases does not afford an adequate remedy. But, in equity, as well as at law, the contract constitutes the right, and regulates the liabilities of the parties; and the object of both proceedings is to place the party complaining as nearly as possible in the same situation as the Defendant had agreed that he should be placed in. It is obvious that persons, strangers to the contract, and, therefore, neither entitled to the right, nor subject to the liabilities which arise out of it, are as much strangers to a proceeding to enforce the execution of it as they are to a proceeding to recover damages for the breach of it.

The aforesaid decision in Tasker was noted with approval in De Hoghton v. Mone. Turner, L.J. observed:

Here again his case is met by Tasker in which case it was distinctly laid down that a purchaser cannot, before his contract is carried into effect, enforce against strangers to the contract equities attaching to the property, a rule which, as it seems to me, is well founded in principle, for if it were otherwise, this Court might be called upon to adjudicate upon questions which might never arise, as it might appear that the contract either ought not to be, or could not be performed.

(emphasis supplied)

 In Amit Kumar Shaw v. Farida Khatoon (supra), this Court examined the correctness of the order passed by the Calcutta High Court which had approved the dismissal of the application filed by the Appellants for impleadment as parties to the suit filed by the original owner Khetra Mohan Das and the transferees, namely, Birendra Nath Dey and Smt. Kalyani Dey. One Fakir Mohammad claimed right, title and interest in the suit property by adverse possession. The suit was decreed by the trial Court. On appeal, the same was remanded for fresh adjudication of the claim of the parties. Fakir Mohammad challenged the order of remand by filing two second appeals. During the pendency of the appeals, Birendra Nath Dey assigned leasehold interest in respect of a portion of the suit property to the Appellants. Smt. Kalyani Dey sold the other portion of the suit property to the Appellants. When the Appellants applied for recording their names in the municipal records, they came to know about the pendency of the appeals. Immediately thereafter, they filed an application for impleadment which was rejected by the High Court. This Court referred to the provision of Order 1 Rule 10(2) and Order 22 Rule 10 CPC as also Section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 and observed:

Section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act is an expression of the principle “pending a litigation nothing new should be introduced”. It provides that pendente lite, neither party to the litigation, in which any right to immovable property is in question, can alienate or otherwise deal with such property so as to affect his appointment. This section is based on equity and good conscience and is intended to protect the parties to litigation against alienations by their opponent during the pendency of the suit.

In order to constitute a lis pendens, the following elements must be present:

1. There must be a suit or proceeding pending in a court of competent jurisdiction.

2. The suit or proceeding must not be collusive.

3. The litigation must be one in which right to immovable property is directly and specifically in question.

4. There must be a transfer of or otherwise dealing with the property in dispute by any party to the litigation.

5. Such transfer must affect the rights of the other party that may ultimately accrue under the terms of the decree or order.

The doctrine of lis pendens applies only where the lis is pending before a court. Further pending the suit, the transferee is not entitled as of right to be made a party to the suit, though the court has a discretion to make him a party. But the transferee pendente lite can be added as a proper party if his interest in the subject-matter of the suit is substantial and not just peripheral. A transferee pendente lite to the extent he has acquired interest from the Defendant is vitally interested in the litigation, where the transfer is of the entire interest of the Defendant; the latter having no more interest in the property may not properly defend the suit. He may collude with the Plaintiff. Hence, though the Plaintiff is under no obligation to make a lis pendens transferee a party, under Order 22 Rule 10 an alienee pendente lite may be joined as party. As already noticed, the court has discretion in the matter which must be judicially exercised and an alienee would ordinarily be joined as a party to enable him to protect his interests.

(emphasis supplied)

 In Savitri Devi v. DJ, Gorakhpur (supra), this Court upheld the order passed by the trial Court for impleadment of Respondent Nos. 3 to 5, who had purchased the suit property without knowledge of the pending litigation, as parties. On behalf of the Appellant, it was argued that Respondent Nos. 3 to 5 cannot be treated as necessary parties because alienation made in their favour was in violation of the injunction order passed by the Court. In support of this argument, reliance was placed on the judgment in Surjit Singh v. Harbans Singh (supra). This Court distinguished that judgment by observing that in that case the assignors and the assignees had knowledge of the injunction order passed by the Court and held that the order passed by the trial Court which was affirmed by the District Judge and the High Court does not call for interference.

 In Vinod Seth v. Devinder Bajaj (supra), this Court interpreted Section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 and observed:

It is well settled that the doctrine of lis pendens does not annul the conveyance by a party to the suit, but only renders it subservient to the rights of the other parties to the litigation. Section 52 will not therefore render a transaction relating to the suit property during the pendency of the suit void but render the transfer inoperative insofar as the other parties to the suit. Transfer of any right, title or interest in the suit property or the consequential acquisition of any right, title or interest, during the pendency of the suit will be subject to the decision in the suit.

The principle underlying Section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act is based on justice and equity. The operation of the bar u/s 52 is however subject to the power of the court to exempt the suit property from the operation of Section 52 subject to such conditions it may impose. That means that the court in which the suit is pending, has the power, in appropriate cases, to permit a party to transfer the property which is the subject-matter of the suit without being subjected to the rights of any part to the suit, by imposing such terms as it deems fit. Having regard to the facts and circumstances, we are of the view that this is a fit case where the suit property should be exempted from the operation of Section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act, subject to a condition relating to reasonable security, so that the Defendants will have the liberty to deal with the property in any manner they may deem fit, in spite of the pendency of the suit.

 In Surjit Singh v. Harbans Singh (supra), this Court considered the question whether a person to whom the suit property is alienated after passing of the preliminary decree by the trial Court, which had restrained the parties from alienating or otherwise transferring the suit property, has the right to be impleaded as party. The trial Court accepted the application filed by the transferees and the order of the trial Court was confirmed by the lower appellate Court and the High Court. While allowing the appeal against the order of the High Court, this Court observed:

In defiance of the restraint order, the alienation/assignment was made. If we were to let it go as such, it would defeat the ends of justice and the prevalent public policy. When the Court intends a particular state of affairs to exist while it is in seisin of a lis, that state of affairs is not only required to be maintained, but it is presumed to exist till the Court orders otherwise. The Court, in these circumstances has the duty, as also the right, to treat the alienation/assignment as having not taken place at all for its purposes. Once that is so, Pritam Singh and his assignees, Respondents herein, cannot claim to be impleaded as parties on the basis of assignment. Therefore, the assignees-respondents could not have been impleaded by the trial court as parties to the suit, in disobedience of its orders.

 In Sarvinder Singh Vs. Dalip Singh and Others, this Court considered the question whether the Respondent who purchased the property during the pendency of a suit for declaration filed by the Appellant on the basis of the registered Will executed by his mother is entitled to be impleaded as party and observed:

The Respondents indisputably cannot challenge the legality or the validity of the Will executed and registered by Hira Devi on 26-5-1952. Though it may be open to the legal heirs of Rajender Kaur, who was a party to the earlier suit, to resist the claim on any legally available or tenable grounds, those grounds are not available to the Respondents. Under those circumstances, the Respondents cannot, by any stretch of imagination, be said to be either necessary or proper parties to the suit. A necessary party is one whose presence is absolutely necessary and without whose presence the issue cannot effectually and completely be adjudicated upon and decided between the parties. A proper party is one whose presence would be necessary to effectually and completely adjudicate upon the disputes. In either case the Respondents cannot be said to be either necessary or proper parties to the suit in which the primary relief was found on the basis of the registered Will executed by the Appellant’s mother, Smt Hira Devi. Moreover, admittedly the Respondents claimed right, title and interest pursuant to the registered sale deeds said to have been executed by the Defendants-heirs of Rajender Kaur on 2-12-1991 and 12-12-1991, pending suit.

Section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act envisages that:

During the pendency in any court having authority within the limits of India… of any suit or proceeding which is not collusive and in which any right to immovable property is directly and specifically in question, the property cannot be transferred or otherwise dealt with by any party to the suit or proceeding so as to affect the rights of any other party thereto under the decree or order which may be made therein, except under the authority of the court and on such terms as it may impose.

It would, therefore, be clear that the Defendants in the suit were prohibited by operation of Section 52 to deal with the property and could not transfer or otherwise deal with it in any way affecting the rights of the Appellant except with the order or authority of the court. Admittedly, the authority or order of the court had not been obtained for alienation of those properties. Therefore, the alienation obviously would be hit by the doctrine of lis pendens by operation of Section 52. Under these circumstances, the Respondents cannot be considered to be either necessary or proper parties to thesuit.’

(emphasis supplied)

 In Bibi Zubaida Khatoon Vs. Nabi Hassan Saheb and Another, this Court was called upon to consider the correctness of the High Court’s order, which declined to interfere with the order passed by the trial Court dismissing the applications filed by the Appellant for impleadment as party to the cross suits of which one was filed for redemption of mortgage and the other was filed for specific performance of the agreement for sale. While dismissing the appeal, this Court referred to the judgments in Sarvinder Singh v. Dalip Singh (supra) and Dhurandhar Prasad Singh Vs. Jai Prakash University and Others, and observed that there is no absolute rule that the transferee pendente lite shall be allowed to join as party in all cases without leave of the Court and contest the pending suit.

Though there is apparent conflict in the observations made in some of the aforementioned judgments, the broad principles which should govern disposal of an application for impleadment are:

1. The Court can, at any stage of the proceedings, either on an application made by the parties or otherwise, direct impleadment of any person as party, who ought to have been joined as Plaintiff or Defendant or whose presence before the Court is necessary for effective and complete adjudication of the issues involved in the suit.

2. A necessary party is the person who ought to be joined as party to the suit and in whose absence an effective decree cannot be passed by the Court.

3. A proper party is a person whose presence would enable the Court to completely, effectively and properly adjudicate upon all matters and issues, though he may not be a person in favour of or against whom a decree is to be made.

4. If a person is not found to be a proper or necessary party, the Court does not have the jurisdiction to order his impleadment against the wishes of the Plaintiff.

5. In a suit for specific performance, the Court can order impleadment of a purchaser whose conduct is above board, and who files application for being joined as party within reasonable time of his acquiring knowledge about the pending litigation.

6. However, if the applicant is guilty of contumacious conduct or is beneficiary of a clandestine transaction or a transaction made by the owner of the suit property in violation of the restraint order passed by the Court or the application is unduly delayed then the Court will be fully justified in declining the prayer for impleadment.